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Tax Base

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NEWS
September 16, 2011
As I read, watch television, and listen to the radio I have become convinced that the biggest impediment to creating jobs in the private sector is the vast number of government regulations that deter investment, especially among small businesses. When more non-government jobs are created, tax revenues will increase. Regulatory reform should be the primary issue before Congress, not another spending bill that will increase taxes. Bill Huppert
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NEWS
Johannes Schmidt | May 2, 2014
In recent weeks, the web has been buzzing with excitement over Palcohol, the powdered alcohol that can turn water into vodka, rum or any one of four specialty cocktails. While it remains unclear when - or if - the product will hit stores, due in part to some backtracking by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), states including Vermont and Minnesota are already moving to ban it. In early April, the TTB granted Palcohol label approval, then rescinded it roughly two weeks later, according to Bevlaw.com, a blog maintained by the Lehrman Beverage Law firm in Virginia.
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NEWS
July 20, 2012
Baltimore City's belated effort to collect full-rate property taxes on unsold but move-in-ready condo units highlights how much reliance the city places on property owners to shoulder, among other things, the costs of infrastructure and public safety services ("Condos' tax bills see big increases," July 16). No doubt these experienced developers had budgeted for these taxes and were wondering just how long the heavily discounted undeveloped-property-tax-rate windfall would last. Does an extra step need to be added to the new property development process to highlight that bright line?
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | April 17, 2014
The debacle regarding film tax credits at the recent legislative session could potentially cause Maryland to lose one of the finest TV programs around today, and all because of misunderstanding of an industry and reliance on failed history. "House of Cards," the Netflix series starring Kevin Spacey, has been filmed in Maryland for each of its first two seasons, mostly in Baltimore City and Harford County. But a failed negotiation between the House and Senate this legislative session left the show in limbo when $3.5 million in tax incentives were left out of a final bill subsidizing the film industry.
NEWS
By Mark Fleming | October 6, 1991
Can you say, "tax base"?Careful, now.These are magic words on the lips of bureaucrats, developers and businessmen who use them as if the door to all sorts of wonders wouldswing open majestically if only we had a greater tax base.Need anew road or school?Chant, "tax base."Sewer plant overflowing?Whisper it reverently: "tax base."Ever see a small group of bright-eyed, sweating men huddled over a tiny pair of rolling white cubes, cursing excitedly and murmuring incantations like "come to papa" and "baby needs a new pair of shoes"?
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Kevin L. McQuaid and Eric Siegel and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writers | November 30, 1994
As the state prepares to reassess property in downtown Baltimore, city budget planners are facing a harsh reality: The value of the city's prime office buildings has continued to plummet, further depleting Baltimore's dwindling tax base.The city will have to refund $4 million this year because of successful appeals of assessments of downtown commercial buildings, budget officials said yesterday. That figure is more than double what was anticipated. In addition, property tax revenues for the current fiscal year are projected to be $3.1 million less than budgeted because of the lower assessments, they said.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Homeowners may soon pay higher property taxes because of the collapse of the commercial real estate market.As the value of office, industrial and retail buildings has fallen, the amount of taxes paid by owners of such properties hasshrunk. And owners of residential property will be forced to make up the difference, according to a report by the Urban Land Institute, a Washington-based real estate research group.The report foresees "a massive shift in the burden of paying for local government services from the commercial sector to the residential sector."
BUSINESS
By Marshall Ingwerson and Marshall Ingwerson,Christian Science Monitor | April 5, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Houses are selling again.One good month -- February -- does not a rebound make in a market strewn with sputters and false starts.But the 9.3 percent increase in the sale of existing houses from January to February was the largest monthly increase in nine years, according to new figures from the National Association of Realtors. Not since the pre-recession month of January 1989 have as many houses sold in a month.If the market continues to spring back, the reverberations promise to stem the erosion in the net worth of homeowning families and the tax base that supports schools and local government.
NEWS
By DARREN M. ALLEN and DARREN M. ALLEN,Staff writer | October 7, 1990
It's a far cry from the million-dollar mansions in Guilford or the expansive waterfront estates in Annapolis, but the gently rolling hills in towns throughout Carroll County make for some attractive lots on which to build large, expensive homes.At least that's what some local Carroll officials are banking on."I guess we've always had an unofficial housing policy that calls for bigger homes and bigger lots," said Neal W. Powell, city manager in Taneytown. "We think it makes for more gracious living."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
Pointing to the city's improving financial picture, Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley is proposing a $2.32 billion budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 -- a 6.7 percent increase over current spending that includes raises for all municipal workers and some targeted, though small, enhancements in services. The budget, to be presented publicly to the Board of Estimates today, includes $1.9 billion in operating funds, about a quarter of which goes for public safety, and $424 million for construction.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
What's with the O's - Gov. Martin O'Malley and President Barack Obama and the minimum wage? Let's face it, most Marylanders and Americans know that the leadership locally and nationally do not care about the working poor. It's all about increasing the tax base so that they will have more of our tax dollars to spend. I think a requirement for those running for an elected position is that they should have worked in the private sector where they might have learned about profits and losses or have owned their own business.
NEWS
June 8, 2013
The vacant lot now known as Harbor Point sure is a beautiful piece of property. To its west lies the newly developed, thriving and beautiful Harbor East. To its east sits one of Baltimore's finest neighborhoods, Federal Hill. And to its south, that which Baltimore treasures most, our lovely harbor. It is sad that this 27-acre lot now lies empty and tarnished - as those who wish to develop it keep reminding us - by toxic waste and a lack of proper road access. I look forward to the day when this property is developed and populated by mixed-use development.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 16, 2013
Editor: That is exactly what the County Council is doing when they try to change the zoning in the middle of owners who are complying with the law. I do not have an opinion one way or the other in regards to Walmart; however I do not like the fact that private property rights are being trampled on. When a piece of property is zoned for a use and the owner is using the property that it is zoned for, why does the Council feel a need to change it...
NEWS
April 1, 2013
A moment of silence, please, for the death of the combined reporting bill in the General Assembly. The corporate tax reform measure passed away suddenly last week, the result of a 7-6 vote by the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, which has developed a nasty habit of killing the bill annually. In lieu of flowers, supporters ask that angry letters be sent to lawmakers. It came as no surprise, of course, but that doesn't make the death of combined reporting any less frustrating.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | February 20, 2013
Excuse me, but what are my fellow Baltimoreans complaining about? The mayor has proposed doing something to avoid an all-out collapse of the city's finances, and some citizens of Paradise-on-the-Patapsco are annoyed, confused or just so cranky and fed up with February they need a good cheesesteak sub from Captain Harvey's. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake wants to lower the city's highest-in-the-state property tax rate to a level that makes the rate more competitive with those in surrounding counties, and — what?
NEWS
By Jim Pettit | December 19, 2012
For years, the right and left have been bickering in Maryland over whether or not people are coming or going, arguments that solved nothing, changed nothing and improved nothing. It's been a hot topic this year, with individual income tax hikes and proposals to raise the gasoline tax front and center on the policy agenda. The question is: At what point do high taxes drive people away to other states? "Virginia, here I come" is a popular refrain on social media posts on groups like Change Maryland's Facebook page, with 25,000 followers who have legitimate qualms about the state's relatively high corporate and individual income tax burdens.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
After more than 10 years of discussion, drafting and revising, the Carroll County commissioners unanimously approved employment campus zoning yesterday, adopting an ordinance that would designate land for business parks and guard industrial parcels against commercial use. The county commissioners said they have laid the groundwork for the creation of high-tech business parks and well-paying jobs. The zoning will help the county increase its industrial land and keep "the talent and potential we have moving through the county now working here instead," said Commissioner Dean L. Minnich.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
The Anne Arundel County auditor is questioning whether special taxation districts being considered by the County Council might hurt the county financially.The districts would make it easier for developers to build subdivisions by relieving them of the burden of paying for roads and sewers and shifting the cost into liens for future homeowners.The administration of County Executive John G. Gary is pushing the legislation, arguing that it would help middle-class families buy homes by reducing their down payments.
NEWS
July 20, 2012
Baltimore City's belated effort to collect full-rate property taxes on unsold but move-in-ready condo units highlights how much reliance the city places on property owners to shoulder, among other things, the costs of infrastructure and public safety services ("Condos' tax bills see big increases," July 16). No doubt these experienced developers had budgeted for these taxes and were wondering just how long the heavily discounted undeveloped-property-tax-rate windfall would last. Does an extra step need to be added to the new property development process to highlight that bright line?
NEWS
March 30, 2012
In his recent op-ed, "Sanctuary Baltimore, no questions asked" (March 26) Dan Rodricks wrongfully assumes that welcoming illegal immigrants will help increase Baltimore's tax base. But there is a consensus among nonpartisan economists that illegal immigrants are a fiscal drain on American taxpayers. A majority of illegal immigrants have less than a high school education and have well below average incomes. The National Research Council found that an illegal immigrant without a high school degree will impose a net cost on taxpayers of $89,000 over his or her lifetime.
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