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NEWS
By Edward L. Hudgins & Robert E. Moffit | November 19, 1991
MANY members of Congress finally seem willing to recognize something well understood by millions of unemployed workers and bankrupt business owners: The U.S. economy is stagnant, with no strong upturn in sight.Two million more Americans are out of work today than 18 months ago. Businesses are still shutting down and consumers are still staying away from the stores.Many lawmakers now understand that a package of tax and budget cuts is needed to lower the barriers to economic activity and growth.
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
The Sun's editorial board just does not get it ("Neuman's reckless veto," April 30). Maryland has been taxed to the hilt in the last seven years. There is nothing left to give. There have been 37 tax and fee increases. That is a failure of leadership here in Maryland. Constantly crowing about making budget cuts that never occurred is a failure of leadership. Perhaps, The Sun should stop pushing its progressive agenda and start being objective when it comes to the tax-and-spend ways of Annapolis.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It will all look very official and proper when President Clinton, flanked by beaming congressional leaders, signs the tax and budget bills into law this morning.But don't look too closely.Between the lines lurks what can only be called human nature. Typos. Bloopers. Unintended consequences. Hidden provisions that have nothing to do with the budget. Vague directives. And outright mistakes.And all because of the way Congress operates: in a rush. In Washington, it is simply standard operating procedure to haggle and procrastinate and then cram at the last minute, pull an all-nighter and get the deal done in a flurry of adrenalin.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
The Baltimore City Council passed $30 million in increased telephone, energy and real estate taxes last night, part of a $2.1 billion budget that - despite the new revenue - still calls for cutting some municipal jobs and services. Finalized in a daylong series of meetings, the tax and budget package was the result of unusually tough bargaining between the council and Mayor Martin O'Malley, who had sought $45 million in higher taxes to stave off deep cuts in the budget year that will begin July 1. O'Malley thanked the council for increasing tax revenues, which he called a politically painful but necessary step to avoid such quality-of-life cuts as less-frequent trash collections and fewer police officers on city streets.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Michael Dresser and Thomas W. Waldron and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
With time ticking away on the General Assembly's annual 90-day session, a band of conservative senators launched a high-stakes filibuster in the Maryland Senate yesterday in an attempt to derail Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposed tobacco tax increase.Proposing amendment after amendment, the senators were able to keep the Senate working on the governor's bill until after 9 p.m. before breaking for the night. The measure would double the state's 36 cents-a-pack tax on cigarettes and impose the first state levy on cigars and smokeless tobacco.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | May 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A new study says Maryland would lose 99,000 jobs in 1995 and personal income would drop 12.5 percent below projected levels if a balanced-budget amendment were enacted this year.Legislation to add a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution has become a perennial on Capitol Hill. Current bills in the House and Senate have been around for more than a year.Lawmakers have shown renewed interest in the idea lately, and it is possible that the measure could be passed and sent to the states for ratification early this summer.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 14, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A proposal to prop up Baltimore by sending more income tax revenue the city's way appeared in deep trouble last night."I wouldn't say it is dead [but] I would say it is ailing," conceded Sen. John A. Pica Jr., D-Baltimore.Mr. Pica is a sponsor of the plan, also pushed by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, to redistribute some local piggyback income tax revenue to the jurisdiction in which it's earned, instead of where the taxpayer lives.Before the governor's aides could translate the idea into legislation, it drew fire from Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1992
Some call it a piggyback tax for the city. Others call it a commuter tax. Either way, a plan to help Baltimore capture some income tax revenue from the people who work there is in deep trouble."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
In an age of conservative Republican tax and budget cutting, Howard County's liberal Democrats have struck back - approving a hefty income tax increase to fuel a 9.35 percent rise in spending next budget year on a series of 3-2 party line votes, leaving local Republicans dispirited and frustrated. County Executive James N. Robey's income tax boost moves Howard from Maryland's third-lowest rate (2.45 percent) to the legal limit (3.20 percent) to provide money for a 4 percent pay raise for county workers, 311 new school employees and to pay higher fixed costs such as insurance - pending further state cuts.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | December 21, 1990
LAST SPRING, Sen. Pat Moynihan lobbed a fine grenade into the tax and budget debate when he proposed a cut in the payroll tax on wage-earners. The Moynihan bill went nowhere as legislation, for it would have diverted too much money from the Social Security system. But its subtext -- how about a tax break for working stiffs? -- bore fruit in the eventual budget deal of last November.Moynihan's real political contribution was to remind Congress why it makes sense to have progressive taxes. Namely, rich people are where the money is, while the middle class is already overstressed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2004
More than any other time in recent memory, blame is the name of the game in Annapolis. With less than two weeks remaining in the General Assembly session, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and House Speaker Michael E. Busch are fully engaged in the fine art of finger-pointing over slot machines, taxes and the state's budget challenges. They held dueling news conferences yesterday within 90 minutes, with each digging deeper into an entrenched position from which neither appears intent to budge.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2003
In an age of conservative Republican tax and budget cutting, Howard County's liberal Democrats have struck back - approving a hefty income tax increase to fuel a 9.35 percent rise in spending next budget year on a series of 3-2 party line votes, leaving local Republicans dispirited and frustrated. County Executive James N. Robey's income tax boost moves Howard from Maryland's third-lowest rate (2.45 percent) to the legal limit (3.20 percent) to provide money for a 4 percent pay raise for county workers, 311 new school employees and to pay higher fixed costs such as insurance - pending further state cuts.
NEWS
October 28, 2000
WHATEVER happened to the fine art of compromise? It seems to have vanished from the lexicon of Republicans on Capitol Hill. The result is more gridlock in Washington, as Republicans try to force their political agenda down President Clinton's throat. This tactic has repeatedly backfired on the GOP. Its members run the risk of being pilloried by the president as a "do-nothing Congress" more interested in helping the rich than the middle class. Republicans seem determined to send Mr. Clinton a "take it or leave it" tax-cut plan that tilts benefits in favor of the well-to-do, at a cost of $240 billion over 10 years.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Trying to squelch a Republican drive for a major tax cut, the Treasury Department has estimated that a House GOP tax proposal would cost the Treasury nearly $3 trillion in the decade when retiring baby boomers begin to strain the Treasury.The department's $2.8 trillion cost estimate would be more than triple the $864 billion that the proposal is expected to cost in its first 10 years.Administration officials say the plan would almost certainly drive the federal budget back into the red, and they plan to use the new Treasury Department estimates in the battle with the GOP over what to do with the burgeoning budget surplus.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Michael Dresser and Thomas W. Waldron and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
With time ticking away on the General Assembly's annual 90-day session, a band of conservative senators launched a high-stakes filibuster in the Maryland Senate yesterday in an attempt to derail Gov. Parris N. Glendening's proposed tobacco tax increase.Proposing amendment after amendment, the senators were able to keep the Senate working on the governor's bill until after 9 p.m. before breaking for the night. The measure would double the state's 36 cents-a-pack tax on cigarettes and impose the first state levy on cigars and smokeless tobacco.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It will all look very official and proper when President Clinton, flanked by beaming congressional leaders, signs the tax and budget bills into law this morning.But don't look too closely.Between the lines lurks what can only be called human nature. Typos. Bloopers. Unintended consequences. Hidden provisions that have nothing to do with the budget. Vague directives. And outright mistakes.And all because of the way Congress operates: in a rush. In Washington, it is simply standard operating procedure to haggle and procrastinate and then cram at the last minute, pull an all-nighter and get the deal done in a flurry of adrenalin.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service Staff Writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With a critical House vote scheduled this week on President Clinton's tax and budget proposal, he and his congressional allies have launched a major effort to win support.Democratic leaders estimate that they need 30 more votes to pass the bill. In the scramble for support, about 60 key House Democrats have been asked to attend a White House strategy meeting this morning.The vote, now scheduled for Thursday, "could make or break this presidency," said a leadership aide who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Trying to squelch a Republican drive for a major tax cut, the Treasury Department has estimated that a House GOP tax proposal would cost the Treasury nearly $3 trillion in the decade when retiring baby boomers begin to strain the Treasury.The department's $2.8 trillion cost estimate would be more than triple the $864 billion that the proposal is expected to cost in its first 10 years.Administration officials say the plan would almost certainly drive the federal budget back into the red, and they plan to use the new Treasury Department estimates in the battle with the GOP over what to do with the burgeoning budget surplus.
NEWS
By CHRIS MONDICS | July 23, 1995
After a year and a half of relative calm, New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman is suddenly locked in intense political combat.She seems to like it this way.Her bare-knuckle approach to wage talks and her decision to lay off hundreds of workers have public employee unions in a state of apoplexy; two state workers were conducting hunger strikes recently. Democrats accuse her of bringing the state to the brink of fiscal ruin. And social and religious conservatives, opposed to her position favoring abortion rights, say they will block any attempt to put her on the national ballot in 1996.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service Staff Writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | May 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- With a critical House vote scheduled this week on President Clinton's tax and budget proposal, he and his congressional allies have launched a major effort to win support.Democratic leaders estimate that they need 30 more votes to pass the bill. In the scramble for support, about 60 key House Democrats have been asked to attend a White House strategy meeting this morning.The vote, now scheduled for Thursday, "could make or break this presidency," said a leadership aide who asked not to be identified.
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