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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
Josephine M. Jones, a former income tax adviser and longtime Roland Park resident, died Aug. 11 of cancer at a Naples, Fla., nursing home. She was 86. Josephine Meeth was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1942 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School. Mrs. Jones was also a 1971 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, where she earned a bachelor's degree. In the early 1950s, Mrs. Jones went to work at Industrial Bearings and Transmissions in Baltimore and rose to general manager.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 1, 2012
Congress returned to "work" this week (now there's a laugh) to complete its lame-duck session before taking another holiday. Spending other people's money is a taxing experience. Their task is to avoid the "fiscal cliff," a geological construct of their own making. It doesn't take a genius to predict both parties will try to do two things: (1) reach an agreement that will allow each side to take some credit and (2) require those who work for a living to pay government more while they come up with phony or inconsequential spending "cuts.
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NEWS
May 4, 1999
John Joseph Kohles Jr., 80, corporate tax adviserJohn Joseph Kohles Jr., a retired corporate tax adviser, died of heart complications Thursday at his Abingdon home. He was 80.After graduating from Loyola College in 1941, he joined the Internal Revenue Service, where he was a tax adviser for large businesses, and retired in the early 1980s.Mr. Kohles then worked about seven years as a tax adviser for the Maryland comptroller's office.The Baltimore native served in the Army in Europe during World War II.He was an active member of Parkville Post 183 of the American Legion and the Abingdon Council of the Knights of Columbus.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
Josephine M. Jones, a former income tax adviser and longtime Roland Park resident, died Aug. 11 of cancer at a Naples, Fla., nursing home. She was 86. Josephine Meeth was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1942 graduate of Notre Dame Preparatory School. Mrs. Jones was also a 1971 graduate of the Johns Hopkins University, where she earned a bachelor's degree. In the early 1950s, Mrs. Jones went to work at Industrial Bearings and Transmissions in Baltimore and rose to general manager.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1994
Here are answers from members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants to readers' tax questions. The Sun will publish answers through April 15.Q: I am filing a Maryland Form 502. On line 16, adjustments to income, it says "do not include federal exemptions on this line." Is the one-half of self-employment tax considered a federal exemption? That's what normally goes on line 25 of the Federal 1040 for self-employed people.A: No. It is not a federal exemption. It is an adjustment.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2001
I am a widow and I would like to know if it is advisable to add my two adult children to my house deed. One is single, the other married. When you add someone to your home deed as a joint tenant, you're making a gift. And that can cause tax and legal problems. Many people like the idea of joint tenancy because holding title to property that way avoids probate, the court process that follows death. At your demise, your home would be transferred without much cost or delay to your children.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
Recently my tax adviser said annuities are one of the best investments for a person near retirement. I am 57 and fully vested in a government retirement pension plan that will give me a generous monthly check in retirement. I also invest in a government thrift savings account and contribute the maximum to Roth IRAs each year. I still have some extra cash to invest after all this. I have no children and plenty of insurance. My friends suggest I simply spend more. What advice do you have for me?
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam and Liz Pulliam,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1999
We gave our granddaughter $10,000 from my wife's Keogh this year. We had started taking annual distributions from the account, although for a smaller amount. Our income tax preparer said the gift is not deductible. Our son, who is very knowledgeable about income taxes, says this is a one-time gift to a relative and is deductible. Who is right?Not your son, that's for sure. Gifts to individuals are never tax-deductible, one time or any time. This makes me wonder what other advice he's given that could be injurious to your financial health.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1997
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.Q. Is the $9,500 limit on a 401(k) tax-free contribution for each spouse or both together?A. The 401(k) tax-free contribution limit of $9,500 is provided on an employee by employee basis. Therefore, each employed spouse could contribute up to $9,500 to his or her 401(k) plan. Of course, there are additional complex limitations in calculating this amount. You should discuss this with your employer, tax adviser or plan sponsor.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2004
The Justice Department asked a federal judge yesterday to effectively shut down a business that it says sells income tax fraud and has bilked the government and 100,000 customers out of $500 million or more. In court papers filed in Las Vegas, the government said it had lost at least $324 million in tax revenue over the past three years because of the company, the National Audit Defense Network, which has 470 employees. But it was the volume of customers that showed how widespread tax cheating has become in the face of a steady erosion in enforcement of the tax laws over the past 15 years.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
Recently my tax adviser said annuities are one of the best investments for a person near retirement. I am 57 and fully vested in a government retirement pension plan that will give me a generous monthly check in retirement. I also invest in a government thrift savings account and contribute the maximum to Roth IRAs each year. I still have some extra cash to invest after all this. I have no children and plenty of insurance. My friends suggest I simply spend more. What advice do you have for me?
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 9, 2001
HOW DO YOU protect yourself in a rocky economy? The AARP Bulletin, November, suggests: "Cut down on unnecessary spending. It's just ascertaining the difference between a `need' and a `want.' Do you really `need' that latte every morning? "Pay off credit-card debt. With fees and interest rates on credit cards as high as 18 percent, there's no way you're going to get that back in the financial markets. "Don't panic sell or panic buy. The worst thing you can do is to make immediate changes out of fear.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2001
I am a widow and I would like to know if it is advisable to add my two adult children to my house deed. One is single, the other married. When you add someone to your home deed as a joint tenant, you're making a gift. And that can cause tax and legal problems. Many people like the idea of joint tenancy because holding title to property that way avoids probate, the court process that follows death. At your demise, your home would be transferred without much cost or delay to your children.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam and Liz Pulliam,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1999
We gave our granddaughter $10,000 from my wife's Keogh this year. We had started taking annual distributions from the account, although for a smaller amount. Our income tax preparer said the gift is not deductible. Our son, who is very knowledgeable about income taxes, says this is a one-time gift to a relative and is deductible. Who is right?Not your son, that's for sure. Gifts to individuals are never tax-deductible, one time or any time. This makes me wonder what other advice he's given that could be injurious to your financial health.
NEWS
May 4, 1999
John Joseph Kohles Jr., 80, corporate tax adviserJohn Joseph Kohles Jr., a retired corporate tax adviser, died of heart complications Thursday at his Abingdon home. He was 80.After graduating from Loyola College in 1941, he joined the Internal Revenue Service, where he was a tax adviser for large businesses, and retired in the early 1980s.Mr. Kohles then worked about seven years as a tax adviser for the Maryland comptroller's office.The Baltimore native served in the Army in Europe during World War II.He was an active member of Parkville Post 183 of the American Legion and the Abingdon Council of the Knights of Columbus.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1998
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.Q: I've acquired AT&T stock through various employee plans since 1947. I do not know the date of the plan completion. Without the date it's impossible to arrive at a price per share. If I want to sell the AT&T stock, how can I arrive at a reasonable price? How would the IRS react if I took a price of about $45 a share? I feel this may be close, but I cannot prove it.A: You should contact AT&T to determine what records the company maintains of your cost basis of stock acquired through its employee plans.
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