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NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 16, 2012
The House of Delegates voted 77 to 60 this afternoon to increase income taxes on the top 14 percent of Marylanders, finishing up business left undone when lawmakers gridlocked at the end of the regular session in April. It still needs to be signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley, who introduced the legislation. The measure completes a spending package that will undo a so-called Doomsday budget that would have cut into Democratic priorities like education and health care. The tax increase will hit roughly 300,000 taxpayers -- individuals who make more than $100,000 and joint filers who earn over $150,000.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
In his letter, "What Brown isn't saying about taxes" (Oct. 9), J. Michael Collins of Reisterstown complains about higher gasoline taxes enacted by the O'Malley-Brown administration and asks "When is The Sun going to call Brown out ... on what he and [Gov. Martin] O'Malley have done," with the effect of these taxes? I'll tell you what they have done, Mr. Collins. They are building a third northbound lane on Route 29 in Howard County where I live to ease what has become a slow-rolling parking lot every afternoon at rush hour.
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NEWS
May 20, 2012
Following yet another tax increase shoved down our throats by the spend-then-tax trio of the Gov.Martin O'Malley, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House SpeakerMichael E. Busch("General Assembly raises income tax on top 14 percent," May 17), there is one positive aspect: At least they didn't scurry about in the middle of the night like cockroaches as they did when passing a record tax hike in 2007. When will Maryland voters learn? Gary Sulin, Forest Hill
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
NEWS
February 16, 2012
If you have a package good store near the county line, Baltimore MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposed 5-cent bottle tax is not a nickel ("Mayor pushes school repairs," Feb. 14). Applying the tax to a 30-pack of beer would cost the city consumer $1.50 more plus a  15-cent sales tax on a tax. The nickel is now $1.65 more than the county! I agree that nickel is no big deal on a single item, but when you buy a bulk package, which is how beverages are sold in a package store, that nickel is devastating and prevents us from being competitive.
NEWS
April 24, 2012
Your editorial about "antiquated" city schools and MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blake's renovation plan with funding from an "extended and increased bottle tax" ("Bottle tax, or what?" April 22) made a lot of sense to me. But why stop there? How about a new nickel tax on newsprint? City subscribers could easily afford the extra nickel tax on newspapers. City pupils would experience a renaissance of learning in their newly-renovated buildings. And local landfills would be spared from ever-increasing truckloads of empty bottles and day-old newspapers.
EXPLORE
May 23, 2013
Editor: Maryland lawmakers are wringing a tax from the rain that falls from our roofs. It won't be long before Governor O'Malley and the General Assembly will come up with a way to tax the rain that falls from our umbrellas. They can use the same criteria that they use for the roofs and the driveways. I can visualize the Maryland Raindrop Constables with their official measuring tape, running after us, assessing all parasols, umbrellas and large golf umbrellas! We will have to cut down on the size of the umbrellas we buy. This may be tongue-in-cheek and sound a little silly, but then whoever heard of a tax on rain?
NEWS
April 15, 2013
In your recent article praising the accomplishments of our governor and this year's legislative session you conveniently omitted the failure to delay implementation of the new "rain tax" that will be assessed on most residents ("Session ends in flurry of votes," April 9). This tax will amount to at least $100 on property tax bills in many jurisdictions. Satellite pictures of your property will be used to determine a resident's assessment. Not only is "Big Brother" watching you, but now he is taxing you for what he sees.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
I think the point that you make in your article about taxing those who can least afford it by raising mass transit fares is a good one ("Keeping fares fair," March 30). Unfortunately, some people think everyone should have to pay their own way and subsidies shouldn't be supported. However, in this case a small increase in the tax on gasoline of a penny or even a few cents may offset the need to increase the fare for transit riders and enable them to go to jobs and be gainfully employed.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
How is it possible that boat registrations in Maryland are stagnant even as boating sales and registrations across the rest of the country are bouncing back from the national recession? I think that Gary Jobson hit the answer squarely by pointing out the impact of Maryland's excessively high boat excise tax ("Bring the boats back," March 8). By not being competitive with our neighboring states up and down the Atlantic Coast, it's clear that Maryland boat owners are choosing to register their vessels in other states to avoid our tax. And that means that all of the local spending and local jobs that typically are created to service local boats are going to other states.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Why doesn't The Sun ask Gov. Martin O'Malley if taxing the businesses that left the state or did not locate here in the first place because of the high taxes had anything to do with declining tax revenue ( "The budget apocalypse that isn't," Sept. 26)? That will be the day! F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 28, 2014
This weekend over 700 people were scheduled to attend our 6th annual Archdiocese of Baltimore Gala to raise money for students who otherwise could not afford to attend a Catholic school in the Archdiocese. Since its inception, the gala has raised more than $4.2 million in tuition assistance and endowment for Catholic schools. The gala is just one way the archdiocese is helping children from low-income families benefit from a Catholic school education. Another is the Partners in Excellence (PIE)
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Maryland consumers who shop online at Amazon.com after Tuesday will be paying more — 6 percent of the sale. Yet most shoppers will click "place your order" anyway. The world's largest online retailer will begin collecting Maryland's sales tax as it prepares to start operations of a massive new distribution center next spring in Southeast Baltimore, where it expects to hire more than 1,000 workers. It has already hired part-time and seasonal workers to staff a smaller "sortation" center nearby that will open this fall.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Campaigns on Baltimore County's east side are still in full swing, but one outcome is already certain: For the first time in nearly half a century, voters get a new state senator. Democratic Sen. Norman Stone, who took office in 1967, is retiring from the General Assembly. Fellow Democrat John Olszewski Jr., currently a state delegate; Republican Johnny Ray Salling, a steelworker; and unaffiliated candidate Scott Collier are competing to replace him. Stone, who entered the Senate the year Spiro Agnew became governor, is its longest-serving member.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
Jean Marbella's "No Free Drinks: Bottle Tax Deserves Another Shot" (May 23) was off the mark. She's for the tax, saying, "Someone show me where you have the right to down all those high-fructose corn syrup-laden drinks you want, and pump it into your kids as well." Doesn't the columnist realize there are sugar-free alternatives, and that water also is sold in bottles? What's more, these unhealthy ingredients are found in all sorts of cereals, sauces and snacks. So why not tax everything under the sun, then?
NEWS
May 19, 2012
Maryland wants more of my money. It may not seem like a big tax increase being presented, but how much money does the state need? I am the so-called wealthy American who must pay more in taxes. Well I pay plenty of taxes so my politicians can yuk it up in their sky boxes. I pay 23.5 cents per gallon in gasoline taxes per fill-up. That's about $400 per year for two cars. I paid $300 in tolls to get to and from work. There was $41 to park for meetings in Baltimore, $180 to register my car, $1,600 in miscellaneous school fees (field trips, sporting events, uniforms, yearbook, prom, homecoming)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The City Council gave final approval Monday to a plan to offer up to $5,000 in tax credits to homeowners who move to new homes but choose to remain in the city. The Resident Retention Tax Credits - which will were approved unanimously by the council - are intended to help residents who lose their Homestead tax credits when they switch homes. The program was pushed at the state level by Del. Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat. Her bill allowed city homeowners to transfer a portion of the Homestead tax credit from their old building to a new property.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | September 17, 2014
I was phoned the other night in middle of dinner by an earnest young man named Spencer, who said he was doing a survey. Rather than hang up, I agreed to answer his questions. He asked me if I knew a soda tax would be on the ballot in Berkeley, Calif. in November. When I said yes, he then asked whether I trusted the Berkeley city government to spend the revenues wisely. At that moment I recognized a classic "push poll," which is part of a paid political campaign. So I asked Spencer a couple of questions of my own. Who was financing his survey?
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