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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | July 21, 2011
Anyone on the lookout for 2014 gubernatorial hopefuls at the 35th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake surely spotted state Comptroller Peter Franchot. And there was Larry Hogan, appointments secretary for former Gov. Bob Ehrlich. But where was Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown? Attorney General Doug Gansler?  “This is the 2014 pre-game show,” said Del. Heather Mizeur, who was among the Tawes attendees surprised by the absence of Brown and Gansler. Former Gov. Marvin Mandel wasn't shocked that some pols skipped Wednesday's event in an off-election year.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Blaine Young isn't exactly a household name in Maryland, but the prospective contender for the Republican GOP nomination has to be a bit better known in political circles after the splash he made at the annual political rite of passage known as the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield Wednesday. Young, president of the Frederick County Board of County Commissioners, brought a busload of supporters to the Eastern Shore fishing port to promote his increasingly credible candidacy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 20, 2011
Some things to consider if you're still on the fence about heading to Crisfield today for the 35th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. The weather: Triple-digit heat index . The crowd: It's an off election year, so some politicians, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, will be no-shows. That will make the event less appealing for some, more appealing for others. The food: As always, hot seafood on a hot blacktop. Annapolis lobbyist and Tawes booster Bruce Bereano is known for offering a more elaborate spread inside his corporate tent.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella | July 21, 2011
Anyone on the lookout for 2014 gubernatorial hopefuls at the 35th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake surely spotted state Comptroller Peter Franchot. And there was Larry Hogan, appointments secretary for former Gov. Bob Ehrlich. But where was Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown? Attorney General Doug Gansler?  “This is the 2014 pre-game show,” said Del. Heather Mizeur, who was among the Tawes attendees surprised by the absence of Brown and Gansler. Former Gov. Marvin Mandel wasn't shocked that some pols skipped Wednesday's event in an off-election year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
Blaine Young isn't exactly a household name in Maryland, but the prospective contender for the Republican GOP nomination has to be a bit better known in political circles after the splash he made at the annual political rite of passage known as the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield Wednesday. Young, president of the Frederick County Board of County Commissioners, brought a busload of supporters to the Eastern Shore fishing port to promote his increasingly credible candidacy.
NEWS
July 21, 2010
The stink of seafood wasn't the only thing hanging over the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake this year. The recession loomed, too, personified by one Earl De Vincentz . Retired from the Baltimore City Fire Department, now a corrections officer at Eastern Correctional Institution, De Vincentz planted himself at the front gates of the annual Crisfield political fest so he could have a word with the men who would be governor. The 65-year-old got the ear of Martin O'Malley as the Democratic governor and his electric-green entourage strolled in. The guards got a 2 percent pay cut last year, no raise this year and expect to have to take three to five unpaid days off next year, De Vincentz complained to O'Malley.
NEWS
March 1, 1991
James Lee Tawes Sr., 61, an advertising department administrator at the Baltimore Sun for many years, died today at Franklin Square Hospital after suffering a heart attack last week.Mr. Tawes, an Air Force veteran, began working in the advertising department 35 years ago. He spent much of that time as the principal advertising makeup person.In that job, he would help decide how many pages each section of the newspapers would be allocated and where various ads would run. He would consult with managers in the papers' editorial departments and other departments to determine the makeup of the papers.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 4, 2007
Scorchy Tawes wasn't much of a hard-hitting journalist. Thank God. Western Shore people didn't get to see his work on WBOC-TV unless they crossed the Chesapeake Bay, and that's a pity. Tawes, who started out broadcasting outdoors reports, expanded his role with the blessing of station managers, who knew a good thing when they saw it. He liked to say he covered the Eastern Shore from "Kiptopeake to Kent County, Bridgeville to Blackwater." For 21 years he did a show called Scorchy's Corner, where he let regular people tell their stories - more than 2,000 all told - in their own words at their own speed.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | May 6, 2006
Odell M. Smith, a former reporter for The Evening Sun and The Sun who later became an assistant to Maryland Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died of complications from a broken hip Monday at Genesis ElderCare's Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. He was 98. Born in Kernersville, N.C., just east of Winston-Salem, Mr. Smith was raised in Guthrie, N.C., a Southern Railway whistle-stop. After graduating from high school, he studied journalism for three years at the University of North Carolina before dropping out during the Depression to take a job as surveyor on the Blue Ridge Parkway highway project.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1999
People were still getting sick in the Tawes Building in Annapolis years after employees began complaining of problems and after an independent study urged a cleanup of the ventilation system, Department of Natural Resources workers say.Six employees, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said at least a dozen employees in the E Wing of the building on Taylor Avenue alerted supervisors about respiratory and severe, recurring gastrointestinal problems about...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 20, 2011
Some things to consider if you're still on the fence about heading to Crisfield today for the 35th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. The weather: Triple-digit heat index . The crowd: It's an off election year, so some politicians, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, will be no-shows. That will make the event less appealing for some, more appealing for others. The food: As always, hot seafood on a hot blacktop. Annapolis lobbyist and Tawes booster Bruce Bereano is known for offering a more elaborate spread inside his corporate tent.
NEWS
July 21, 2010
The stink of seafood wasn't the only thing hanging over the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake this year. The recession loomed, too, personified by one Earl De Vincentz . Retired from the Baltimore City Fire Department, now a corrections officer at Eastern Correctional Institution, De Vincentz planted himself at the front gates of the annual Crisfield political fest so he could have a word with the men who would be governor. The 65-year-old got the ear of Martin O'Malley as the Democratic governor and his electric-green entourage strolled in. The guards got a 2 percent pay cut last year, no raise this year and expect to have to take three to five unpaid days off next year, De Vincentz complained to O'Malley.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2010
It's a Maryland thing. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley and Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. joined thousands of sweltering crab-pickers Wednesday who circled though tents and tables at the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. O'Malley labeled it a "must-attend event. " Ehrlich called it a "have-to. " The 34-year-old tradition draws politicians from across Maryland — never more so than in an election year — to a sleepy Eastern Shore town. This fall, voters will choose a governor, all 188 state legislators, local officials, a U.S. senator and members of Congress.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | July 17, 2009
I drove three hours to Crisfield on Wednesday and three hours back, and for a few hours in between talked to a bunch of politicians out on a hot parking lot. It was so worth it, if only to (almost) see Martin O'Malley and Doug Duncan cross paths. The Democratic governor and the Democrat who might challenge him in next year's primary came face to face at the J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. Duncan, the former Montgomery County executive, has hinted that he might run, either for governor or for lieutenant governor with former Prince George's exec Wayne Curry at the top of the ticket.
NEWS
December 16, 2007
Philip Wesley Tawes, a retired insurance executive and son of former Maryland Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Dec. 7 at his Crisfield home. He was 85. Mr. Tawes, who was born and raised in Crisfield, was also the son of the late Avalynne Gibson Tawes. He was a 1939 graduate of Crisfield High School and left the University of Maryland to enlist in the Army during World War II. He served with Company L 1229th Division from Crisfield and landed at Normandy, France, on June 12, 1944.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 4, 2007
Scorchy Tawes wasn't much of a hard-hitting journalist. Thank God. Western Shore people didn't get to see his work on WBOC-TV unless they crossed the Chesapeake Bay, and that's a pity. Tawes, who started out broadcasting outdoors reports, expanded his role with the blessing of station managers, who knew a good thing when they saw it. He liked to say he covered the Eastern Shore from "Kiptopeake to Kent County, Bridgeville to Blackwater." For 21 years he did a show called Scorchy's Corner, where he let regular people tell their stories - more than 2,000 all told - in their own words at their own speed.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
Charles Norris "Scorchy" Tawes, a former roving reporter and photographer for WBOC-TV who traveled the back roads, villages and towns of the Delmarva Peninsula recording the life stories of the folks he met along the way, died Monday of cardiovascular disease at the Alice Byrd Tawes Nursing Home in Crisfield. He was 86. Mr. Tawes was an accomplished fisherman, and the Scorchy Tawes Pro-Am Fishing Tournament was named after him. He began his television career in 1975 at WBOC in Salisbury, giving an outdoors and fishing report.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2002
CRISFIELD - For all his wandering about Delmarva, Charles Norris "Scorchy" Tawes has never met a stranger, he has never lacked for stories and he's never ceased to be fascinated by the rural peninsula where he knows somebody "just about everywhere." Tawes believes that pretty much anyone has a story, and if people trust you, they'll tell the truth. Now, after a lifetime of putting their stories on film and video, the 81-year-old is spending a good chunk of what is supposed to be retirement hunched in front of a desktop computer or out wandering his bayside hometown with a digital camera.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
Charles Norris "Scorchy" Tawes, a former roving reporter and photographer for WBOC-TV who traveled the back roads, villages and towns of the Delmarva Peninsula recording the life stories of the folks he met along the way, died Monday of cardiovascular disease at the Alice Byrd Tawes Nursing Home in Crisfield. He was 86. Mr. Tawes was an accomplished fisherman, and the Scorchy Tawes Pro-Am Fishing Tournament was named after him. He began his television career in 1975 at WBOC in Salisbury, giving an outdoors and fishing report.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
CRISFIELD -- The J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake is billed as Maryland's must-attend, see-and-be-seen political institution, equal parts seafood, sweat and schmooze. And yesterday's gathering drew politicians from Ocean City to Cumberland, all intent on letting it be known that the event is an unparalleled chance to gorge on seafood and sway voters. But the truth is this: The politicians eat no crabs, and there are few voters to convince. Many attendees are either working for campaigns or from out of state.
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