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By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
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By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
When his parents refused to send him to college, Tavis Smiley showed up at Indiana University anyway, eventually talking his way into a place in class and a work-study program to help pay for it. Denied an internship in the office of then-Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, he pleaded his case in what he acknowledges was a "tear-stained" letter to the mayor - and got his internship. Fired from his job as interview-show host on BET, he quickly turned around and landed programs on PBS, NPR and a handful of other media outlets, extending both his reach and influence.
NEWS
By Felicia Pride and Felicia Pride,Special to The Sun | October 7, 2007
When media personality Tavis Smiley unveiled The Covenant With Black America in 2006, Charisse Carney-Nunes, a 40-year-old mother of two, felt something was missing from the blueprint for social change: children. In an adamant voice, Carney-Nunes recalls what she announced to her colleagues at the Jamestown Project, a think tank involved with the Tavis Smiley Group to advance the goals of the New York Times best-selling book: "No movement for social change has ever been successful until you tap into the young people, reach into their hearts and minds and inspire them to get involved and make a difference."
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | September 27, 2007
It is not a good look for my party when one of its top presidential contenders blows off invitations from Hispanic and African-American groups while eagerly appearing before the National Rifle Association. As Rudolph W. Giuliani flagellates himself before the NRA for his past support of gun control, many Hispanics and African-Americans (and many Republicans of all ethnicities) wonder: Why does he think he can now make inroads with the defenders of the Second Amendment and not with their growing and vibrant communities?
NEWS
By Felicia Pride and Felicia Pride,Special to The Sun | October 7, 2007
When media personality Tavis Smiley unveiled The Covenant With Black America in 2006, Charisse Carney-Nunes, a 40-year-old mother of two, felt something was missing from the blueprint for social change: children. In an adamant voice, Carney-Nunes recalls what she announced to her colleagues at the Jamestown Project, a think tank involved with the Tavis Smiley Group to advance the goals of the New York Times best-selling book: "No movement for social change has ever been successful until you tap into the young people, reach into their hearts and minds and inspire them to get involved and make a difference."
FEATURES
January 17, 2006
The kidnapping of her daughter forces a woman (Cate Blanchett) to form a truce with her estranged father in a desperate bid to get her back in The Missing (8 p.m.-10:30 p.m., Encore). Network COMMANDER IN CHIEF -- 9 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2 / The Koreans threaten war, but the president's main concern is saving sailors aboard the sub. ABC. SCRUBS -- 9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11 / Cox's born-again sister shows up for a baptism. NBC. NCIS -- 8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13 / Turns out a kidnapped officer is one of a handful who know the route of a train carrying nuclear fuel.
FEATURES
By SANDRA CROCKETT and SANDRA CROCKETT,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
Tavis Smiley is anxious.He's on a plane flying from Los Angeles to Dulles Airport, and the plane is an hour late.Smiley simply can't be late. He is the host of an 11 p.m. talk show that is broadcast live across the country. No Smiley. No show. Big trouble."Everyone was sweating that one," says Smiley, who, 10 hours later, is looking supremely at ease as he sips an apple juice in the dining room of the Washington hotel he lives in while in town.He did make it in time to sit in the host chair, conduct an interview with Pentecostal Bishop T. D. Jakes and take on-air telephone calls.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
Just five Republican candidates - half the invited field - will take part in Thursday's presidential debate in Baltimore, event organizers said yesterday. The four leading contenders, Rudolph W. Giuliani, John McCain, Mitt Romney and Fred Thompson, have each said they will not participate in the forum focusing on issues facing minority voters. Their absence has drawn the ire of Tavis Smiley, the talk-show host who is moderating and organizing the debate at Morgan State University; he said the candidates are making a mistake in not reaching out to black voters.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Jensen and Elizabeth Jensen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 22, 2004
NEW YORK - Moving swiftly to replace departed talk show host Tavis Smiley, National Public Radio said it will launch a new daily public affairs program aimed at the black community with journalist Ed Gordon as host. News and Notes With Ed Gordon will start in late January. Gordon, who, like Smiley, previously hosted an evening show on the BET cable network, will be based in New York, where he is also a contributing correspondent for CBS News' 60 Minutes. Gordon will have a yet-to-be-named co-host on the West Coast.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | September 27, 2007
It is not a good look for my party when one of its top presidential contenders blows off invitations from Hispanic and African-American groups while eagerly appearing before the National Rifle Association. As Rudolph W. Giuliani flagellates himself before the NRA for his past support of gun control, many Hispanics and African-Americans (and many Republicans of all ethnicities) wonder: Why does he think he can now make inroads with the defenders of the Second Amendment and not with their growing and vibrant communities?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | September 26, 2007
When his parents refused to send him to college, Tavis Smiley showed up at Indiana University anyway, eventually talking his way into a place in class and a work-study program to help pay for it. Denied an internship in the office of then-Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, he pleaded his case in what he acknowledges was a "tear-stained" letter to the mayor - and got his internship. Fired from his job as interview-show host on BET, he quickly turned around and landed programs on PBS, NPR and a handful of other media outlets, extending both his reach and influence.
FEATURES
January 17, 2006
The kidnapping of her daughter forces a woman (Cate Blanchett) to form a truce with her estranged father in a desperate bid to get her back in The Missing (8 p.m.-10:30 p.m., Encore). Network COMMANDER IN CHIEF -- 9 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2 / The Koreans threaten war, but the president's main concern is saving sailors aboard the sub. ABC. SCRUBS -- 9 p.m.-9:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11 / Cox's born-again sister shows up for a baptism. NBC. NCIS -- 8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13 / Turns out a kidnapped officer is one of a handful who know the route of a train carrying nuclear fuel.
FEATURES
By SANDRA CROCKETT and SANDRA CROCKETT,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
Tavis Smiley is anxious.He's on a plane flying from Los Angeles to Dulles Airport, and the plane is an hour late.Smiley simply can't be late. He is the host of an 11 p.m. talk show that is broadcast live across the country. No Smiley. No show. Big trouble."Everyone was sweating that one," says Smiley, who, 10 hours later, is looking supremely at ease as he sips an apple juice in the dining room of the Washington hotel he lives in while in town.He did make it in time to sit in the host chair, conduct an interview with Pentecostal Bishop T. D. Jakes and take on-air telephone calls.
NEWS
October 7, 2007
Stephanie Shapiro Stephanie Shapiro has been a features reporter covering various beats for The Sun and Evening Sun since 1985. As a lifestyles writer, she writes about everything, including home design. In this edition of UniSun, Shapiro takes note of four African-American homeowners and tells you how they added depth and character to their favorite room, using mementos, art, artifacts and other personal touches.
NEWS
By KARLAYNE R. PARKER and KARLAYNE R. PARKER,UNISUN EDITOR | June 4, 2006
There were lots of nationally renowned speakers in town worth listening to this spring. All of them came with a cause. Broadcaster Tavis Smiley stopped at a local church in April to talk about his book, Covenant With Black America, which is a New York Times best-seller. He was promoting the book and its goal -- to uplift and empower African- Americans. Many of us saw Hotel Rwanda, a movie that depicted the massacre of hundreds of thousands of people in Rwanda. Rwanda hotel manager Paul Rusesabagina, who lived through the events and saved many lives, came to town in April to give insights to the massacre as part of his book tour.
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