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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 10, 2009
Jesse N. McDade-Bey, who taught philosophy at Morgan State University for nearly 30 years and had been a frequent guest on WJZ-TV's "Square Off" talk show, died of vascular dementia July 27 at the Joseph Richey House hospice. He was 72 and had lived in Hamilton. Dr. McDade-Bey, the son of a Methodist minister and a homemaker, was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn. After graduating from Austin High School in 1956, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1960 from Clark University in Worcester, Mass.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Elizabeth M. Solter, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who had been a member of the U.S. Equestrian Team and went on to a successful career as a rider, died Sept. 12 of breast cancer at Amberly Farms, her farm in Berlin, Worcester County. She was 47. "I saw Elizabeth come up through the ranks and hit the heights, and it was a joy to watch. She just had natural ability," said Tommy Serio, one of the top riders and trainers in the country, who was a longtime friend and competitor.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | December 13, 1994
Mildred L. Buckley Hipsley, who taught in the Baltimore city and county school systems, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Dulaney-Towson Health Care Center. The longtime resident of East Joppa Road was 95.She retired in 1963 from the city school system where she had taught kindergarten and elementary classes since 1945.She began her career in the early 1920s, teaching in a two-room schoolhouse on Falls Road near Bare Hills, where her sister, Gertrude Buckley, was the school's other teacher and its principal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2004
Roger M. Shaw, a retired teacher of dyslexic children and wounded combat veteran of World War II, died of complications from congestive heart failure and diabetes Wednesday at his North Baltimore home. He was 79. Born and raised in Glenolden, Pa., as a young man he enlisted in the Marine Corps. He was hit in the back by shrapnel at Iwo Jima and awarded the Purple Heart. He later said, "I needed to go to war to learn about peace." While recuperating from back surgery for his wound in California, he decided to dedicate his life to teaching.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2001
Hershel H. Newlin, a public high school teacher in Baltimore and former naval officer, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at his home in Jacksonville, northern Baltimore County. He was 93. For about eight years in the 1930s, Mr. Newlin taught mechanical drawing and shop at Polytechnic Institute and Southern High School. "He was proud of having taught at Poly, and he was also proud of having been an officer in the Navy," said his son, Michael J. Newlin Jr. of Timonium. Born in Marshall, Ind., Mr. Newlin worked as a teen with his father building and remodeling houses, barns and churches.
NEWS
April 21, 1991
Benjamin F. Emenheiser, who taught history at City College for 44 years, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital from complications of diabetes. He was 93.Mr. Emenheiser was a native of Annville, Pa., and a 1921 graduate of Lebanon Valley College. He taught for a year in Freeland, Pa., before moving to Baltimore and joining the faculty of City College, where he taught until retirement in 1966.He led the history department at City College and, for 4 1/2 years, at the old Baltimore Junior College, originally housed in the same building at 33rd Street and The Alameda.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
Grace L. Venture, who had taught art in Baltimore County public schools and later taught emotionally disturbed children, died of heart failure Thursday at Sinai Hospital. She was 86. She was born and raised Grace Lucille Dennis in Pittsburgh, and earned a bachelor's degree in 1941 from what is now Morgan State University. She later earned a master's degree in art from New York University and a doctorate in art therapy and program administration from Union Graduate School, a division of Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio.
FEATURES
By Lou Carlozo and Lou Carlozo,Chicago Tribune | February 17, 2000
Charlie Pierce of Hutchinson High School in Kansas has taught evolution in his biology class for close to 20 years. But starting this school year, Pierce was no longer required to include evolution -- a fact that distresses him and other Kansas science teachers. "We're going back to the 1880s," Pierce said. Last summer, the Kansas Board of Education voted to remove from the state's curriculum all references to evolution, the belief that life formed over billions of years, with humans and apes sharing a common ancestor.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2008
Margaret Perin, who taught generations of Baltimoreans to overcome a fear of swimming and was an advocate of downtown living, died of congestive heart failure July 22 at her Mount Vernon home. She was 95. Margaret Vogel was born in Baltimore. She learned to swim when she was 6 years old and by 13 she had become South Atlantic backstroke champion, a title she held for three years. She was a 1931 Friends School graduate and captain of the varsity swim team. She studied piano and voice at the Peabody Institute.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Helena E. Sawyer Roberts Wright, a retired city elementary school teacher and principal who was an active member of Heritage United Church of Christ, died Aug. 18 at her Lochearn home of complications from heart disease. She was 93. "She was a pillar of Baltimore education and society," said Latrell A. Clark, an educator who had attended Hilton Elementary School from 1977 to 1983 when Mrs. Wright was its principal. "She made learning fun and made you want to come to school. " The daughter of John Sawyer and Clara Doyle Sawyer, who owned and operated a boarding house, the former Helena Elizabeth Sawyer was born in Norfolk, Va., and moved in 1929 to Lexington Street in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Val Jean Slowinski, a retired Towson University professor who had been active for more than two decades with the Cockpit in Court Theater in Essex, died Wednesday at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin of a stroke. She was 78. The former Val Jean Sytko was born in Newark, N.J., and raised in Irvington, N.J., where she graduated in 1953 from Irvington High School. In 1957, she graduated from Kean University, formerly Newark State Teachers College, and later earned a master's degree in speech pathology and audiology at what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Sister Mary Mark Walsh, a retired teacher who was a member of the Sisters of Mercy for nearly 78 years, died of heart failure Saturday at the Villa, her order's Baltimore County retirement home. She was 97. Born Ruth Anna Walsh in Baltimore County, she was the daughter of Charles S. Walsh, a farmer, and Minnie Woolrey Walsh, a homemaker. According to a biography supplied by the Sisters of Mercy, she grew up on the family farm near the Liberty Dam. There were no Catholic schools in immediate area and she received her early religious training from the Jesuit fathers at the old Woodstock College.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Rita Sloan Berndt, a neurology professor at the University of Maryland Medical School for 25 years who studied people who suffered from aphasia, the loss of the power to use or understand words, died June 17 of lymphoma at her home in Roland Park. She was 70. Sheila Blumstein, a professor of cognitive linguistics and psychological sciences at Brown University, called her colleague and friend a force in the fields of aphasia and neuroscience. "We have yet to truly understand aphasia and the reasons behind it, but we've come a long way, and Rita was part of the reason we've come a long way," Dr. Blumstein said.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Allen Grossman,a prize-winning poet who spent 15 years teaching his craft to students at the Johns Hopkins University, died June 27 at his home in Chelsea, Mass. He was 82 and had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Allen was an inimitable instructor," said Douglas Basford, assistant director of composition at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a former student of Dr. Grossman's at Hopkins. Remembering a class he audited in poetry and poetics, Mr. Basford recalled the instructor "probing and prodding to get, as he did in his critical prose, to the core of how a poem worked [and]
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Ann Elizabeth Stromberg, a retired orthoptist who worked with children with eye conditions and trained medical students during her six-decade career, died of Alzheimer's disease June 4 at Somerford Home in Columbia. The Ellicott City resident was 91. Born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville on Delrey Avenue, she was the daughter of Henry Stromberg, a News American advertising salesman, and Edna Amanda Ray, a homemaker. She was a 1941 graduate of Mount de Sales Academy and earned a diploma at Mount St. Agnes College in Mount Washington.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1997
Gail Siemer seems too nice to be throwing elbows around on the basketball court and snapping a little angrily at her Chesapeake-AA coach for some picks to help set her free from the double- and triple-teams she faces every game."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
AMONG YOGI Berra's famous malapropisms, "This is like deja vu all over again" has become a cliche. No doubt that's why it kept coming to mind Wednesday, as 367 Maryland educators gathered at Turf Valley conference center in Ellicott City to launch a multiyear, $66 million campaign to help Maryland children learn to read. From state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and several of the nation's eminent reading researchers, the educators heard a familiar litany: Four of every 10 Maryland third-graders lack proficiency in reading.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Franklin Waters "Buck" Trapnell Jr., a retired Army colonel who served in Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 31 while visiting family near Richmond, Va. The former Roland Park resident was 77. Born in Baltimore and raised on Lake Avenue in Cedarcroft, he was the son of Franklin Waters Trapnell, an attorney who became an Office of Strategic Services and Central Intelligence Agency officer. His mother was Emily Willson Rieman Smith, a homemaker and volunteer. According to an autobiographical sketch, he spent much of his youth in Berlin, Germany, and Vienna, Austria, after World War II during the military occupation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Betty J. "BJ" Lewenz, a former art teacher, photographer, poet and naturalist, died May 23 of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The longtime Ruxton resident was 91. The daughter of Ralph Curtis Deatrick and Amy Carol Henderson Deatrick, Betty Jane Deatrick was born and raised in Gettysburg, Pa. Starting in her midteens, Mrs. Lewenz, who was known throughout her life as "BJ," worked as a copy editor, illustrator and photographer for...
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