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NEWS
June 16, 1997
A headline on an item in the Foreign Digest incorrectly said yesterday that artworks were damaged in a fire at the Tate Gallery in London. Paintings and other works of art were removed before any could be damaged.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/16/97
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun foreign staff | November 21, 1999
LONDON -- Step inside the Tate Gallery and enjoy a great British modern art duel. In one corner is the Bloomsbury group, the early 20th-century artists and intellectuals who were as renowned for their private affairs as their public works in painting, pottery, furniture and literature. In the other corner is the latest batch of hip, young artists nominated for Britain's top art award, the Turner Prize. Paint is not their thing. And in one famous case, neither is making a bed. From the lines snaking through the galleries and the whirring of cash registers, it's clear that the exhibitions create good box office, while also serving as bookends to Britain's artistic century.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | November 24, 1993
LONDON -- The seven tons of American long-grain rice lighted by warmly glowing pink neon tubes was the most edible entry for Britain's most prestigious and controversial contemporary art award.It turned out to be indigestible.The 1993 Turner Prize instead went to Rachel Whiteread, a 30- year-old London sculptor whose plaster casts started small with the ordinary objects of everyday life salvaged from the trash bins and worked up to the interior of rooms and finally a whole house."She found a new way to explore reality by casting it," said Simon Wilson, the director of the Tate Gallery, where the works of four finalists were exhibited.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
Rory Calhoun, 76, the stalwart hero of Western movies and the television series "The Texan," died Wednesday in Burbank, Calif. He had been hospitalized with advanced emphysema and diabetes.Dame Christian Howard, 82, a leader in the movement that led the Church of England to ordain women as priests, died April 22 in York, England.Melba Liston, 73, a jazz trombonist, composer and arranger who worked with bands led by Dizzy Gillespie and Quincy Jones, died April 23 in Los Angeles after suffering a series of strokes.
NEWS
March 21, 1999
Doris M. Drury,72, the first woman to head the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, died Tuesday. Ms. Drury, a longtime professor at the University of Denver and Regis University, also was a pioneer in helping women get bank loans.Patrick Heron,79, Britain's foremost abstract painter, died yesterday, the director of London's Tate Gallery said. The Tate Gallery held a retrospective exhibition of Mr. Heron's work last year. He was a principle member of the St. Ives group of artists.Marian Searchinger,81, New York theatrical agent who represented actors Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee and Jane Alexander, died Monday in Santa Barbara, Calif.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1996
LONDON -- In Britain's clubby modern art world, the talk this week isn't about sales but about crime.Scotland Yard is investigating a scheme in which art forgers allegedly tampered with archives at the Tate Gallery and other prestigious museums, allowing conspirators then to "authenticate" forged works that could command hundreds of thousands of dollars.Among the items under suspicion are works attributed to three 20th-century artists: the Swiss-born sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti, English painter Ben Nicholson and the American-born sculptor Jacob Epstein.
NEWS
April 30, 1999
Rory Calhoun, 76, the stalwart hero of Western movies and the television series "The Texan," died Wednesday in Burbank, Calif. He had been hospitalized with advanced emphysema and diabetes.Dame Christian Howard, 82, a leader in the movement that led the Church of England to ordain women as priests, died April 22 in York, England.Melba Liston, 73, a jazz trombonist, composer and arranger who worked with bands led by Dizzy Gillespie and Quincy Jones, died April 23 in Los Angeles after suffering a series of strokes.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | December 21, 1997
AS THE INEVITABLE 1997 yuletide crescendo builds, it seems appropriate to reflect on my adventures of the past year. Readers may recall that in August I returned from a year-long teaching exchange in England.For the 1996-97 school year, I hung out my shingle at St. Ivo School in St. Ives, East Anglia, 13 miles northwest of Cambridge and some 70 miles straight up from London. We lived just across the River Ouse in the quintessentially British village of Hemingford Grey where thatched roofs, 900-year-old Norman churches and all the warm beer you'd ever want to drink were just a short walk away.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun foreign staff | November 21, 1999
LONDON -- Step inside the Tate Gallery and enjoy a great British modern art duel. In one corner is the Bloomsbury group, the early 20th-century artists and intellectuals who were as renowned for their private affairs as their public works in painting, pottery, furniture and literature. In the other corner is the latest batch of hip, young artists nominated for Britain's top art award, the Turner Prize. Paint is not their thing. And in one famous case, neither is making a bed. From the lines snaking through the galleries and the whirring of cash registers, it's clear that the exhibitions create good box office, while also serving as bookends to Britain's artistic century.
NEWS
By Bennard Perlman | August 29, 2000
LONDON -- Before the new Tate Gallery of Modern Art opened along the banks of the Thames in May, experts predicted a first-year attendance of between 1 million and 2 million. The 1 million figure was reached after just six weeks. What could possibly draw that many visitors to Britain's first modern art museum, which focuses exclusively on works of the 20th century? For one thing, talk in this city of Big Ben is that the millennium year is marked by bigness. Initially there was the Millennium Dome, a gigantic structure whose roof covers better than 20 acres.
NEWS
March 21, 1999
Doris M. Drury,72, the first woman to head the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, died Tuesday. Ms. Drury, a longtime professor at the University of Denver and Regis University, also was a pioneer in helping women get bank loans.Patrick Heron,79, Britain's foremost abstract painter, died yesterday, the director of London's Tate Gallery said. The Tate Gallery held a retrospective exhibition of Mr. Heron's work last year. He was a principle member of the St. Ives group of artists.Marian Searchinger,81, New York theatrical agent who represented actors Ossie Davis, Ruby Dee and Jane Alexander, died Monday in Santa Barbara, Calif.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | December 21, 1997
AS THE INEVITABLE 1997 yuletide crescendo builds, it seems appropriate to reflect on my adventures of the past year. Readers may recall that in August I returned from a year-long teaching exchange in England.For the 1996-97 school year, I hung out my shingle at St. Ivo School in St. Ives, East Anglia, 13 miles northwest of Cambridge and some 70 miles straight up from London. We lived just across the River Ouse in the quintessentially British village of Hemingford Grey where thatched roofs, 900-year-old Norman churches and all the warm beer you'd ever want to drink were just a short walk away.
NEWS
June 16, 1997
A headline on an item in the Foreign Digest incorrectly said yesterday that artworks were damaged in a fire at the Tate Gallery in London. Paintings and other works of art were removed before any could be damaged.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 6/16/97
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 1996
LONDON -- In Britain's clubby modern art world, the talk this week isn't about sales but about crime.Scotland Yard is investigating a scheme in which art forgers allegedly tampered with archives at the Tate Gallery and other prestigious museums, allowing conspirators then to "authenticate" forged works that could command hundreds of thousands of dollars.Among the items under suspicion are works attributed to three 20th-century artists: the Swiss-born sculptor and painter Alberto Giacometti, English painter Ben Nicholson and the American-born sculptor Jacob Epstein.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | November 24, 1993
LONDON -- The seven tons of American long-grain rice lighted by warmly glowing pink neon tubes was the most edible entry for Britain's most prestigious and controversial contemporary art award.It turned out to be indigestible.The 1993 Turner Prize instead went to Rachel Whiteread, a 30- year-old London sculptor whose plaster casts started small with the ordinary objects of everyday life salvaged from the trash bins and worked up to the interior of rooms and finally a whole house."She found a new way to explore reality by casting it," said Simon Wilson, the director of the Tate Gallery, where the works of four finalists were exhibited.
NEWS
February 16, 2002
IT'S A GIVEN that admirers will flock to see J.M.W. Turner's works at the Baltimore Museum of Art. But, quite wonderfully, even novices can leave the new exhibit with a degree of expertise, thanks to explanations of the great British artist's watercolor techniques and favorite hues. Turner (1775-1851) is hailed as the greatest of all British painters. He certainly was extremely prolific, producing some 20,000 works during his career. When he bequeathed the contents of his studio to the British nation, those alone totaled more than 100 finished oil paintings, 182 oil studies and more than 20,000 watercolors and sketches.
NEWS
By William Tuohy and William Tuohy,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 1992
LONDON -- Francis Bacon, widely regarded as Britain's greatest contemporary painter, died of a heart attack in Madrid yesterday while visiting friends in Spain.The 82-year-old painter was highly controversial in traditional artistic circles because his powerful canvases, executed with splashing brush strokes, were often concerned with the themes of sex, suffering and death. Many regarded his paintings as obscene.But his work commanded high prices. A Bacon triptych recently sold in New York for $7 million.
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