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By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 11, 1993
The strange man in her apartment was her brother.Do you feel better now?Television viewers learned from a commercial last week that romance continues to percolate between the neighbors who first met when she borrowed his Taster's Choice coffee.The new ad is the sixth in a series that has perked the public's interest for two years and has increased the sales of Taster's Choice coffee by 10 percent.In the previous 45-second interlude, the series' hero was dismayed when the door to his lovely neighbor's apartment opened to reveal a good-looking guy who seemed only too comfortable being there.
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
A heady, fresh-from-the-oven aroma filled the North Carroll Senior Center as final preparations were under way for the farm-fresh luncheon that was topped off with entries in the annual bake-off contest. A table brimmed with varieties of fruit, nut, red velvet and fudge cakes, stirring comments, reminiscences and a few comparisons. While crab cakes sizzled and freshly shucked corn steamed on the stove, a group gathered around the piano to sing familiar tunes and a team engaged in a lively game of billiards.
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FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 5, 1993
The world's slowest love affair is picking up steam.The seventh in a series of Taster's Choice coffee commercials aired on CBS' "Northern Exposure" Monday night. And it concludes with a kiss. So what, you say?So this kiss has been a long time coming.This particular ad campaign, created by McCann-Erickson for Nestle Co., which makes Taster's Choice, features a romance between two sophisticated singles. It first began percolating after she knocked on his door and asked to borrow some coffee.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 25, 2004
2002 Lindemans Bin 50 Shiraz, Southeastern Australia ($7). After tasting a string of disappointingly tough Australian shirazes in the $20-$30 range, it is a delight to taste one that delivers soft, pleasant and complete flavors for under $8. It offers generous blackberry, plum and chocolate flavors - with no hard edges. It's not complex or profound, but this is a thoroughly enjoyable red wine for the novice or veteran taster.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 25, 2004
2002 Lindemans Bin 50 Shiraz, Southeastern Australia ($7). After tasting a string of disappointingly tough Australian shirazes in the $20-$30 range, it is a delight to taste one that delivers soft, pleasant and complete flavors for under $8. It offers generous blackberry, plum and chocolate flavors - with no hard edges. It's not complex or profound, but this is a thoroughly enjoyable red wine for the novice or veteran taster.
NEWS
June 30, 1996
The Taster's Choice couple is at it again. Their TV-commercial love affair began brewing in 1990, when an intriguing woman visited her neighbor, Michael, after she ran out of coffee. .The 12th episode left viewers wondering what would happen after the woman's ex-husband unexpectedly stopped by as she was getting ready for an evening out with Michael. Viewers were left hanging as Michael was about to enter the woman's apartment.Episode 13 brings viewers back to that tense moment. Will Michael meet the ex-husband face to face for the first time?
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | April 25, 1991
Coffee commercials used to be such cozy and homey affairs, what with kindly Mrs. Olson dropping by with her can of Folgers, or girlfriends spending a rainy day indoors with their Cafe Viennas.But then Taster's Choice started an ongoing series of seductive commercials in which a pair of neighbors use the instant coffee to meet and engage in some flirtatious bantering. To date, the elegant brunette and her roguish, sandy-haired neighbor have exchanged teasing words and jars of Taster's Choice, but have yet to consummate their flirtation with even a shared cup of the stuff.
FEATURES
April 8, 1991
Now that we know who killed Laura Palmer, the biggest mystery on TV is: What's going to happen to the flirting neighbors who share a lust for Taster's Choice coffee and, perhaps, each other?Here's the story thus far: In the first commercial, the woman is having a dinner party and goes to the man's place to borrow some coffee. In the second one, the woman returns the favor by dropping off a jar of the stuff to the man, who is having dinner with another woman!There's more going on here than coffee: There's a definite chemistry between the elegant, brunet woman and her rather roguish neighbor.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Our eight-member taste panel came to only one conclusion: 14 types of peanut butter are too many to compare in just one hour. There were no clear-cut winners though a couple of peanut butters were resoundingly loathed.Participants, including those who swore by only certain brands, were unable to pick out their favorites. One man who only refuses to eat anything but Skippy Super Crunch gave it a paltry 4.The findings of our unscientific test did not surprise Mitch Head, executive director for the Peanut Advisory Board in Atlanta.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Maryland has 13 wineries, two in Carroll County and another two on the Frederick side of Mount Airy.Each winery offers tours and tastings.* Berrywine Plantations, Linganore Winecellars, 13601 Glissans Mill Road, Mount Airy; 795-6432 or 831-5889.On 230 acres, LinganoreWine Cellars -- a division of Berrywine -- is the largest single planting of grapes in the state and the first in Maryland to be federally designated as a viticultural area, said Anthony Aellen.Aellen and his father, John P. Aellen, established the vineyards in 1972 and began producing the grape and fruit wines in 1976.
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
Decadently layered chocolate cakes, cookies of all kinds and a wide array of fudge and brownies filled the Bel Air National Guard Armory yesterday in celebration of the third annual Downtown Bel Air Chocolate Festival. Despite the event's postponement Jan. 24 because of bad weather, people with a sweet tooth from throughout the region gathered to savor the delectable creations of more than 20 chocolate and candy vendors. Among these were Cacao chocolates of Crownsville, which provided an assortment of fine European chocolates; Coffee Coffee of Bel Air and Baltimore, which contributed chocolate-flavored coffees, biscotti and scones; and Moore's Candies of Bel Air. While hand-dipping peanut clusters in melted chocolate at the Moore's Candies table, Jim Heyl, president and co-owner, said his family-run company has participated in the festival since it began in 2002.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 14, 2004
THE NEW YEAR started off with a grind, as I made my own hamburger. My home-ground burger did not get rave reviews from my family. "Too tough," said one son who, as kids do, came home from college for the holidays and proceeded to eat us out of house and home. "Too stringy," chimed in his older brother, also home from college for the holidays, and also a chowhound. My grind-your-own effort was fueled in part by culinary curiosity and in part by the recent mad-cow scare. I wondered if freshly ground meat would taste better than store-bought hamburger.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
With descriptions such as robust, fruity and piquant repeatedly tossed out, the event at the Carroll County Farm Museum yesterday sounded like a fancy wine tasting. But museum visitors weren't talking about fermented grape juice. They were evaluating another fruit: tomatoes. The Moskovich -- bright red and large as a man's fist -- had "great color but a bland taste," said Steve Allgeier, a consultant with the Maryland Cooperative Extension. He said he favored the bolder-tasting Yellows, adding, "You really know you are eating a tomato."
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
At the 11th annual Wine in the Woods festival in Columbia this weekend, there will be plenty of room for wine novices. While more than 10,000 expected visitors sample a variety of vintages among the trees of Symphony Woods, people who want to know when to sniff and when to swirl, what wine goes with their favorite meal or the difference between chardonnay and cabernet can get up to speed with four wine demonstrations each day. "What we are trying to...
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | November 20, 2002
I AM ONE OF those grouches who complain that holiday hoopla starts too early in the season. I make an exception, of course, for drinking holiday beers. Once the clocks have been turned back to standard time and the fridge has been cleared of any lingering Oktoberfest brews, I am in a holiday-beer mood. Last week, I sampled, along with six other tasters, 22 of this season's crop of bottled holiday beers. I pause here for a note on nomenclature. There was an era when the strong brews that appeared at this time of year were called "Christmas beers."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
This place is a sweet-tooth's dream: cakes next to cookies next to brownies next to pies, all free. But the people inside the building labeled "Exhibition 3" remain businesslike amid the hundreds of delicacies. This is work. They have to eat everything. Food judging at the Howard County Fair in West Friendship is not for the faint-hearted or queasy-stomached - and certainly not for anyone on a strict diet. Yesterday, 16 cooking experts tasted their way through 425 baked goods as they attempted to sift blue-ribbon contenders from the not-quite-rights in a category open to all ages.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 15, 1992
The kosher wines available in the Baltimore area represent three continents: Asia (Israel), Europe (France, Italy and Spain) and North America (California). The broadest selection of kosher wines in Baltimore can be found at Milford Liquors on Liberty Road.Most kosher wines are denoted by a "hechsher," usually a U inside an O (for Orthodox Union), but there are other supervisory organizations with different symbols. Kosher wine labels do not always tell, in English at least, whether a wine is mevushal.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2001
This place is a sweet-tooth's dream: cakes next to cookies next to brownies next to pies, all free. But the people inside the building labeled "Exhibition 3" remain businesslike amid the hundreds of delicacies. This is work. They have to eat everything. Food judging at the Howard County Fair in West Friendship is not for the faint-hearted or queasy-stomached - and certainly not for anyone on a strict diet. Yesterday, 16 cooking experts tasted their way through 425 baked goods as they attempted to sift blue-ribbon contenders from the not-quite-rights in a category open to all ages.
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