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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 2001
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan - More U.S. military personnel and equipment arrived at a former Soviet air base in Uzbekistan over the weekend, preparing for the American-led military campaign that began yesterday. After a meeting Friday between Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Uzbek President Islam Karimov in Tashkent, several U.S. C-17 cargo planes landed at the Khanabad air base outside Karshi, about 100 miles north of the Afghan border. The equipment they carried included Blackhawk helicopters, which could be used for aid flights over the border or for search and rescue missions for downed pilots, said a U.S. government official familiar with the activity.
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NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2004
MOSCOW - A series of explosions and clashes between suspected terrorists and police left at least 18 people dead and dozens wounded in Uzbekistan, a U.S. ally in the fight against terrorism, authorities said yesterday. Two blasts yesterday in the capital, Tashkent, killed a suicide bomber and two victims, and an explosion Sunday night in the Bukhara region took nine lives, Uzbek Interior Ministry spokesman Aziz Ernazarov said. Six police officers also were killed Sunday night in a clash with gunmen believed to be terrorists, he said.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 15, 2001
SO YOU WANT to get away, you and the significant other, and you're looking for a place to unwind, have a little fun, maybe take in a few sights. The Caribbean? Please. The whole frolicking-in-the-surf, sipping-the-fruity-drinks thing has been done to death. Europe? Sure, that's fine - if you want to run into every other mope from Baltimore with a Ravens T-shirt and Nike sweats clicking a Kodak Instamatic. No, what you need is someplace exciting. Someplace off the beaten path. And I've got just the place: Uzbekistan.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | November 15, 2001
SO YOU WANT to get away, you and the significant other, and you're looking for a place to unwind, have a little fun, maybe take in a few sights. The Caribbean? Please. The whole frolicking-in-the-surf, sipping-the-fruity-drinks thing has been done to death. Europe? Sure, that's fine - if you want to run into every other mope from Baltimore with a Ravens T-shirt and Nike sweats clicking a Kodak Instamatic. No, what you need is someplace exciting. Someplace off the beaten path. And I've got just the place: Uzbekistan.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 1999
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan -- His worst fears have been realized, President Islam Karimov darkly informed his nation: The violent religious fanaticism of Afghanistan's Taliban and the Iranian-supported Hezbollah have indeed spread to this former Soviet state in Central Asia.The assertion was made soon after six bombs blew up near government buildings in downtown Tashkent last month, killing 16 people and injuring 130, and changing all the calculations in tightly policed Uzbekistan. Karimov quickly announced the arrest of 30 people, pronouncing them radical Islamists who had been trained in neighboring Afghanistan and Tajikistan -- as well as Chechnya.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2004
MOSCOW - A series of explosions and clashes between suspected terrorists and police left at least 18 people dead and dozens wounded in Uzbekistan, a U.S. ally in the fight against terrorism, authorities said yesterday. Two blasts yesterday in the capital, Tashkent, killed a suicide bomber and two victims, and an explosion Sunday night in the Bukhara region took nine lives, Uzbek Interior Ministry spokesman Aziz Ernazarov said. Six police officers also were killed Sunday night in a clash with gunmen believed to be terrorists, he said.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 28, 1992
Tashkent, Uzbekistan -- THE THREAT to this vast crossroads, this Central Asian republic, used to come from Moscow. It came palpably, in the form of autocratic orders, officious party bureaucrats and brutal security forces.Today, probably the biggest threat to Uzbekistan's tentative new six-month-old independence is a strangely amorphous one. It comes on the winds, carrying salt and poisoned dust as far south as the ancient city of Samarkand and even to Kirgizstan on the Chinese border.The new threat emerges directly from the death of the once-great Aral Sea. Until recent years, the Aral was a vast, shallow, oval-shaped sea, 25,659 square miles in area, the world's fourth-largest body of inland water.
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NEWS
By Hannah Strauss | October 19, 1994
Fifteen blue stairs to Morocco Cafe,an Israeli garden of chairs, neat arrayof white tables and napkins,the green-aproned girl who walks homeafter closing.The green-aproned girl came here fromTashkent through the Turkestan mountains.Her brother the chemist still calls herMiss Shtern, his Galina, but hereshe is Galit and here speaks no Russian.At Morocco Cafe once she liftedher lashes and the green awningslifted their lashes widefor one moment of billowing clothhigh on the hips of this townof BeershevaHer hands on her apron,her eyes, her face shy as the roofrose to bosom the warm-chested sky:ripple of western canvasand breeze, for Galina onewidening ripple of canvas and breeze.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 17, 1992
SAMARKAND, Uzbekistan -- With President Islam Karimov leading the way, Secretary of State James A. Baker III whipped through the capital of Tamerlane's 14th century empire yesterday after an opposition leader bluntly told him that modern Uzbekistan remains a totalitarian regime despite the collapse of the Soviet Union.Wrapping up his post-independence tour of the new governments of Central Asia, Mr. Baker obtained a promise from Mr. Karimov that Uzbekistan would brush up its human-rights record and institute genuinely democratic politics.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 2001
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan - More U.S. military personnel and equipment arrived at a former Soviet air base in Uzbekistan over the weekend, preparing for the American-led military campaign that began yesterday. After a meeting Friday between Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld and Uzbek President Islam Karimov in Tashkent, several U.S. C-17 cargo planes landed at the Khanabad air base outside Karshi, about 100 miles north of the Afghan border. The equipment they carried included Blackhawk helicopters, which could be used for aid flights over the border or for search and rescue missions for downed pilots, said a U.S. government official familiar with the activity.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 1999
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan -- His worst fears have been realized, President Islam Karimov darkly informed his nation: The violent religious fanaticism of Afghanistan's Taliban and the Iranian-supported Hezbollah have indeed spread to this former Soviet state in Central Asia.The assertion was made soon after six bombs blew up near government buildings in downtown Tashkent last month, killing 16 people and injuring 130, and changing all the calculations in tightly policed Uzbekistan. Karimov quickly announced the arrest of 30 people, pronouncing them radical Islamists who had been trained in neighboring Afghanistan and Tajikistan -- as well as Chechnya.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | February 28, 1992
Tashkent, Uzbekistan -- THE THREAT to this vast crossroads, this Central Asian republic, used to come from Moscow. It came palpably, in the form of autocratic orders, officious party bureaucrats and brutal security forces.Today, probably the biggest threat to Uzbekistan's tentative new six-month-old independence is a strangely amorphous one. It comes on the winds, carrying salt and poisoned dust as far south as the ancient city of Samarkand and even to Kirgizstan on the Chinese border.The new threat emerges directly from the death of the once-great Aral Sea. Until recent years, the Aral was a vast, shallow, oval-shaped sea, 25,659 square miles in area, the world's fourth-largest body of inland water.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2004
MOSCOW - A string of bombings and clashes with police this week in Uzbekistan were the work of a group with foreign ties, the chief prosecutor of the Central Asian country said yesterday. Ten policemen, 33 suspected Islamic militants and four civilians - including three children - were killed in the series of incidents that began Sunday night when 10 people died in an explosion in the central region of Bukhara, Prosecutor General Rashid Kadyrov said at a news conference in Tashkent, the capital.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 10, 2004
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan - The Uzbek government yesterday blamed four recent days of deadly attacks and suicide bombings on a banned Islamic group whose members allegedly got their training from the instructors of al-Qaida fighters. But a member of the outlawed organization said in an interview that her group had played no part in the unrest. "We only use two tools to fight the regime: our religious ideas and peaceful political means," said the 31-year-old woman, who spent five years in Uzbek prisons for her membership in Hizb ut-Tahrir, the banned Party of Liberation.
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