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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Eddie Tarver Jr., a retired restaurant cook who attracted a following at a Lexington Market raw bar, died of heart disease Friday at Sinai Hospital. The Gwynn Oak resident was 93, and leaves 108 descendants across four generations. Born and raised in Bullock County, Ala., Mr. Tarver moved to Baltimore in 1937. He lived in the 600 block of N. Carey St. for many years. He worked as a laborer in the 1940s in the foundries of Koppers Co. and Gibson & Kirk in Southwest Baltimore. In the 1950s, he became a chef at the old Dubner's Restaurant on Frederick Avenue and was a seafood handler at Gordon's Crab House near Patterson Park.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
Barbara Ann Tarver, who worked in Baltimore schools as a teacher and assistant principal for more than three decades, died Aug. 22 from injuries sustained in a two-car crash early that morning on Interstate 70. She was 61. Ms. Tarver was born, raised and educated in Baltimore. She graduated from Western High School in 1966 and earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from what is now Coppin State University, where she joined the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. in 1970. A few years later, she received a master's degree from the same school, remembers friend Ann Ezell.
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SPORTS
By Lonnie White and Lonnie White,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Glen Johnson had to work for everything he could get against Antonio Tarver last night and, thanks to his steady pressure and strong final two rounds, he proved to be the world's best light heavyweight with a split decision at Staples Center. "I'm still not the best, but I'm still looking for Mr. Best," said Johnson, 35, who earned his way into the fight by dominating Roy Jones Jr., and knocking him out in the ninth round in September. "Definitely, Antonio is a great fighter.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Park's Adrienne Tarver is one of the top midfielders in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland B Conference, but that's just one aspect of her rich high school life. In addition to playing soccer and basketball, the senior is active in several tutoring and mentoring programs for youngsters at Park and at Lockerman Bundy Elementary. Tarver, 17, is also a leader for Park's Habitat for Humanity commitment. Doing her senior project at a law firm, the A/B student is considering a career in law. A veteran of the TLC club program, she used her exceptional speed to excel all over the field for the defending B Conference champion Bruins, leading them in draw controls and interceptions while contributing 19 goals.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- The frustrated U.S. boxing team took a couple more lumps last night when gold-medal hopefuls Antonio Tarver and Floyd Mayweather were defeated in their semifinal bouts, leaving only light middleweight David Reid with a chance to win a gold at the Atlanta Olympiad.Tarver tired in the third round and was outpointed by Vasilii Jirov of Kazakstan, 15-9, in the 178-pound division, but the American team cried foul -- and accused the judging panel of bias -- when Mayweather came up short in the 125-pound semifinal.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
The Fighter of the Year in 2004 was not Bernard Hopkins. Or Winky Wright. Or Marco Antonio Barrera. Or James Toney. It was Glen Johnson, who, as recently as 2003, considered retirement after winning only six of 15 fights during a frustrating downward spiral. "But, somehow, you know you have to pick yourself back up," said Johnson, a 36-year-old Jamaican-born fighter known as "The Road Warrior" for his reputation of engaging rivals on their home turf. "You have to have faith to go back to the gym and start all over again.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
Even on the worst night of his professional career, Roy Jones defeated tough left-hander Antonio Tarver. In doing so, Jones said he earned more respect from fans than he did in dominating most of his previous 49 opponents. "I conquered myself and my opponent all at one time. As a matter of fact, I got more credit for that fight than any other fight I have had to date," said Jones, who claimed rapid weight loss had weakened him. "I had a lot of guys tell me, `I always thought you were a great champion,' but that they had always seen me when things were going my way," Jones said during a recent conference call.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 18, 2002
Two brothers were arrested and a third was being sought after drug raids Tuesday at three Forest Park dwellings. Seized in the raids were an estimated $184,000 worth of heroin and cocaine, $4,700 in cash, a .30-caliber rifle, a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun, ammunition, jewelry, cell phones, pagers and a computer believed to contain drug sales records, police said. The raids - in the 5300 block of Norwood Ave., 3800 block of Ferndale Ave. and 3000 block of Fendall Ave. - followed two weeks of undercover work by members of the Northern District's drug enforcement unit, including purchases of cocaine and heroin, said its head, Sgt. Troy Cooper.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | November 18, 2005
Coach: Paul Hewitt, sixth season at school (99-66), ninth overall (162-93) 2004-05 record: 20-12, 8-8 (tied for fourth in ACC; NCAA second round) Returning starters: None Sun prediction: Losing record Why it will happen: Forward-center Theodis Tarver is the only player on the roster with any prior starting experience. In addition to Tarver, guard Mario West is the only other upperclassman on scholarship. It's up to sophomore Zam Fredrick, who averaged 6.7 minutes last season, to run the point.
SPORTS
By Skip Myslenski and Skip Myslenski,Chicago Tribune | November 17, 1991
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. -- They were bashed at last season's end, bashed for the selfish play that earned them a first-round exit from the NCAA tourney. And as their summer passed, they came to realize clearly that they needed an attitude check. They discussed that among themselves, even held a players-only meeting about it.And by the time they appeared to face Indiana in Friday's Tip-Off Classic, UCLA's Bruins assured one and all they were a different bunch in mind, though still the same in body.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | November 18, 2005
Coach: Paul Hewitt, sixth season at school (99-66), ninth overall (162-93) 2004-05 record: 20-12, 8-8 (tied for fourth in ACC; NCAA second round) Returning starters: None Sun prediction: Losing record Why it will happen: Forward-center Theodis Tarver is the only player on the roster with any prior starting experience. In addition to Tarver, guard Mario West is the only other upperclassman on scholarship. It's up to sophomore Zam Fredrick, who averaged 6.7 minutes last season, to run the point.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Roy Jones Jr. was nearly untouchable in his first 50 professional fights, 38 of which ended with his rivals on their backsides, victims of his speed, quickness and reflexes. Those skills helped him outclass other outstanding fighters such as former world champions Bernard Hopkins, James Toney, Vinny Pazienza, Mike McCallum, Montell Griffin, Virgil Hill and heavyweight John Ruiz. The only loss in his first 50 bouts was by disqualification to Griffin. "In the 1990s, Roy was one of the greatest fighters ever, even though he was never a traditional fighter, in the sense of being sound technically," said boxing historian Thomas Hauser, referring to Jones' absence of a basic jab, among other things.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2005
The Fighter of the Year in 2004 was not Bernard Hopkins. Or Winky Wright. Or Marco Antonio Barrera. Or James Toney. It was Glen Johnson, who, as recently as 2003, considered retirement after winning only six of 15 fights during a frustrating downward spiral. "But, somehow, you know you have to pick yourself back up," said Johnson, a 36-year-old Jamaican-born fighter known as "The Road Warrior" for his reputation of engaging rivals on their home turf. "You have to have faith to go back to the gym and start all over again.
SPORTS
By Lonnie White and Lonnie White,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Glen Johnson had to work for everything he could get against Antonio Tarver last night and, thanks to his steady pressure and strong final two rounds, he proved to be the world's best light heavyweight with a split decision at Staples Center. "I'm still not the best, but I'm still looking for Mr. Best," said Johnson, 35, who earned his way into the fight by dominating Roy Jones Jr., and knocking him out in the ninth round in September. "Definitely, Antonio is a great fighter.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
Even on the worst night of his professional career, Roy Jones defeated tough left-hander Antonio Tarver. In doing so, Jones said he earned more respect from fans than he did in dominating most of his previous 49 opponents. "I conquered myself and my opponent all at one time. As a matter of fact, I got more credit for that fight than any other fight I have had to date," said Jones, who claimed rapid weight loss had weakened him. "I had a lot of guys tell me, `I always thought you were a great champion,' but that they had always seen me when things were going my way," Jones said during a recent conference call.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
Eddie Tarver Jr., a retired restaurant cook who attracted a following at a Lexington Market raw bar, died of heart disease Friday at Sinai Hospital. The Gwynn Oak resident was 93, and leaves 108 descendants across four generations. Born and raised in Bullock County, Ala., Mr. Tarver moved to Baltimore in 1937. He lived in the 600 block of N. Carey St. for many years. He worked as a laborer in the 1940s in the foundries of Koppers Co. and Gibson & Kirk in Southwest Baltimore. In the 1950s, he became a chef at the old Dubner's Restaurant on Frederick Avenue and was a seafood handler at Gordon's Crab House near Patterson Park.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
Barbara Ann Tarver, who worked in Baltimore schools as a teacher and assistant principal for more than three decades, died Aug. 22 from injuries sustained in a two-car crash early that morning on Interstate 70. She was 61. Ms. Tarver was born, raised and educated in Baltimore. She graduated from Western High School in 1966 and earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from what is now Coppin State University, where she joined the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. in 1970. A few years later, she received a master's degree from the same school, remembers friend Ann Ezell.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Park's Adrienne Tarver is one of the top midfielders in the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland B Conference, but that's just one aspect of her rich high school life. In addition to playing soccer and basketball, the senior is active in several tutoring and mentoring programs for youngsters at Park and at Lockerman Bundy Elementary. Tarver, 17, is also a leader for Park's Habitat for Humanity commitment. Doing her senior project at a law firm, the A/B student is considering a career in law. A veteran of the TLC club program, she used her exceptional speed to excel all over the field for the defending B Conference champion Bruins, leading them in draw controls and interceptions while contributing 19 goals.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 18, 2002
Two brothers were arrested and a third was being sought after drug raids Tuesday at three Forest Park dwellings. Seized in the raids were an estimated $184,000 worth of heroin and cocaine, $4,700 in cash, a .30-caliber rifle, a .45-caliber semiautomatic handgun, ammunition, jewelry, cell phones, pagers and a computer believed to contain drug sales records, police said. The raids - in the 5300 block of Norwood Ave., 3800 block of Ferndale Ave. and 3000 block of Fendall Ave. - followed two weeks of undercover work by members of the Northern District's drug enforcement unit, including purchases of cocaine and heroin, said its head, Sgt. Troy Cooper.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | August 3, 1996
ATLANTA -- The frustrated U.S. boxing team took a couple more lumps last night when gold-medal hopefuls Antonio Tarver and Floyd Mayweather were defeated in their semifinal bouts, leaving only light middleweight David Reid with a chance to win a gold at the Atlanta Olympiad.Tarver tired in the third round and was outpointed by Vasilii Jirov of Kazakstan, 15-9, in the 178-pound division, but the American team cried foul -- and accused the judging panel of bias -- when Mayweather came up short in the 125-pound semifinal.
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