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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 1997
When Moliere ridiculed religious hypocrisy in "Tartuffe," he rattled French audiences of the late 17th century. His comic play's lasting relevance is likely to hit home for Baltimore audiences of the late 20th century, too.Characters like Tartuffe are still piously making their presence known through mass-media ministries. As if to reinforce that point, the actor embodying Tartuffe, Sam McCready, responds to one attack on Tartuffe's self-proclaimed virtue by slipping into the Southern accent of a televangelist and proclaiming with feigned humility, "I'll not defend myself."
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2006
Bay Theatre Company transports its audience to 17th-century Paris with its production of Moliere's masterwork Tartuffe. Dressed in luxurious, ornate period costumes designed by Jill Kyle-Keith and placed in designer Dave Buckler's gold-trimmed jewel of a set, Bay's stellar cast brought robust life to this classic. In Richard Wilbur's 1963 elegant and accessible translation, the 10 actors negotiated the play's poetic language without being constrained by it as they told this tale of human foibles.
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By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2006
For its coming production of Moliere's Tartuffe, Bay Theatre Company has had to think big. The troupe, the only one in the county that relies entirely on professional paid actors, has brought together its largest cast to date. Capping what director and company co-founder Lucinda Merry-Browne described as "without a doubt our most successful season yet," she estimated that 150 actors auditioned for the 11 roles. It is a bit of a squeeze for the intimate theater space in the West Garrett office building in downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2006
For its coming production of Moliere's Tartuffe, Bay Theatre Company has had to think big. The troupe, the only one in the county that relies entirely on professional paid actors, has brought together its largest cast to date. Capping what director and company co-founder Lucinda Merry-Browne described as "without a doubt our most successful season yet," she estimated that 150 actors auditioned for the 11 roles. It is a bit of a squeeze for the intimate theater space in the West Garrett office building in downtown Annapolis.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 2000
With its circular central platform surrounded by white pillars, the set for Olney Theatre Center's production of "Tartuffe" looks like a cross between a wedding cake and a giant music box. And, indeed, director Halo Wines' solid staging of Moliere's 17th-century comedy is a pleasantly harmonious confection. In the play, Orgon, a gullible Paris aristocrat, falls under the sway of a flim-flam holy man named Tartuffe. If Orgon's home is depicted as an elegant music box -- complete with tinkly music and dance interludes between scenes -- the pseudo-pious Tartuffe sounds the sole discordant note.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 6, 1994
If Moliere's archetypal hypocrite, Tartuffe, were alive today, he'd probably be a TV evangelist with a 900 number for phone-in donations.At Theatre Hopkins, Tony Colavito doesn't make the character's sleazy duplicity that obvious, and director Suzanne Pratt doesn't update the play to the present. But she does move the 17th century French comedy to the 1950s, and Colavito is slimy enough to pass for, say, a used car salesman -- one with a taste for Caddies and Jags."Tartuffe" can rise or fall based on the portrayal of the title character, and Colavito doesn't disappoint.
NEWS
By Nora C. Koch and Nora C. Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 28, 1997
Look for flamboyant costumes, rhyming verse and plenty of comedy tonight with the opening performance of "Tartuffe," a 17th-century spoof on religious hypocrisy, at Alumni Hall Theater at Western Maryland College.Written by the French playwright and actor Moliere in the mid-1600s, the neoclassical comedy received intense opposition from the Roman Catholic Church, and was performed only once in its original form during Moliere's life.Ron Miller, associate professor of theater at WMC and the play's director, chose "Tartuffe" because he thought the acting style would challenge his students.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2006
Bay Theatre Company transports its audience to 17th-century Paris with its production of Moliere's masterwork Tartuffe. Dressed in luxurious, ornate period costumes designed by Jill Kyle-Keith and placed in designer Dave Buckler's gold-trimmed jewel of a set, Bay's stellar cast brought robust life to this classic. In Richard Wilbur's 1963 elegant and accessible translation, the 10 actors negotiated the play's poetic language without being constrained by it as they told this tale of human foibles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 2, 2000
Olney Theatre Center opens its 2000 season tomorrow with "West Side Story," directed by Bradford Watkins and starring a cast of young area actors headed by Kevin Duda as Tony and Tracy Olivera as Maria. The 1957 modern retelling of "Romeo and Juliet" by Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents will be one of two musicals in the new season. Here's the rest of the lineup: Moliere's "Tartuffe" (April 11-May 14); Noel Coward's "Hay Fever" (May 30-July 1); Potomac Theatre Festival (July 11-Aug.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2001
Relations between the sexes have changed considerably over the centuries. The developments of the past few decades have even been called a sexual revolution. Perhaps, though, things haven't altered quite as radically as we'd like to think. At Kittamaqundi Theatre, audiences watch scenes from 10 plays written between 411 B.C. and the 1970s, each showing interaction between a man and a woman. The 21st-century Americans related to just about all of them. The excerpts, aptly selected by director Alan Peterkofsky and titled "Two by Ten," range from tragic to comic and explore many facets of the man-woman relationship.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2001
Relations between the sexes have changed considerably over the centuries. The developments of the past few decades have even been called a sexual revolution. Perhaps, though, things haven't altered quite as radically as we'd like to think. At Kittamaqundi Theatre, audiences watch scenes from 10 plays written between 411 B.C. and the 1970s, each showing interaction between a man and a woman. The 21st-century Americans related to just about all of them. The excerpts, aptly selected by director Alan Peterkofsky and titled "Two by Ten," range from tragic to comic and explore many facets of the man-woman relationship.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 2000
With its circular central platform surrounded by white pillars, the set for Olney Theatre Center's production of "Tartuffe" looks like a cross between a wedding cake and a giant music box. And, indeed, director Halo Wines' solid staging of Moliere's 17th-century comedy is a pleasantly harmonious confection. In the play, Orgon, a gullible Paris aristocrat, falls under the sway of a flim-flam holy man named Tartuffe. If Orgon's home is depicted as an elegant music box -- complete with tinkly music and dance interludes between scenes -- the pseudo-pious Tartuffe sounds the sole discordant note.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 2, 2000
Olney Theatre Center opens its 2000 season tomorrow with "West Side Story," directed by Bradford Watkins and starring a cast of young area actors headed by Kevin Duda as Tony and Tracy Olivera as Maria. The 1957 modern retelling of "Romeo and Juliet" by Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Laurents will be one of two musicals in the new season. Here's the rest of the lineup: Moliere's "Tartuffe" (April 11-May 14); Noel Coward's "Hay Fever" (May 30-July 1); Potomac Theatre Festival (July 11-Aug.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 1997
When Moliere ridiculed religious hypocrisy in "Tartuffe," he rattled French audiences of the late 17th century. His comic play's lasting relevance is likely to hit home for Baltimore audiences of the late 20th century, too.Characters like Tartuffe are still piously making their presence known through mass-media ministries. As if to reinforce that point, the actor embodying Tartuffe, Sam McCready, responds to one attack on Tartuffe's self-proclaimed virtue by slipping into the Southern accent of a televangelist and proclaiming with feigned humility, "I'll not defend myself."
NEWS
By Nora C. Koch and Nora C. Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 28, 1997
Look for flamboyant costumes, rhyming verse and plenty of comedy tonight with the opening performance of "Tartuffe," a 17th-century spoof on religious hypocrisy, at Alumni Hall Theater at Western Maryland College.Written by the French playwright and actor Moliere in the mid-1600s, the neoclassical comedy received intense opposition from the Roman Catholic Church, and was performed only once in its original form during Moliere's life.Ron Miller, associate professor of theater at WMC and the play's director, chose "Tartuffe" because he thought the acting style would challenge his students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 6, 1994
If Moliere's archetypal hypocrite, Tartuffe, were alive today, he'd probably be a TV evangelist with a 900 number for phone-in donations.At Theatre Hopkins, Tony Colavito doesn't make the character's sleazy duplicity that obvious, and director Suzanne Pratt doesn't update the play to the present. But she does move the 17th century French comedy to the 1950s, and Colavito is slimy enough to pass for, say, a used car salesman -- one with a taste for Caddies and Jags."Tartuffe" can rise or fall based on the portrayal of the title character, and Colavito doesn't disappoint.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [CHRISTINA LEE] | April 19, 2007
`Tartuffe' The lowdown -- It is believed that Louis XIV banned the first production of Tartuffe, or "The Hypocrite," because of its harsh criticism of morality and religious piety. But audiences everywhere have grown to appreciate playwright Moliere's comedic talents. The Vagabond Players bring Richard Wilbur's verse translation to Baltimore tomorrow through May 20. If you go -- Showtimes at the Vagabond, 806 S. Broadway, are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through May 20. Tickets are $13-$15.
NEWS
June 29, 2007
WILLIAM HUTT, 87 Canadian actor William Hutt, widely regarded as one of Canada's finest classical actors and a company member at the Stratford Festival for almost four decades, died Wednesday of leukemia at Stratford General Hospital, the Festival announced. At the Stratford Festival, where he was a founding member, Mr. Hutt was involved in 130 productions as either an actor or director. Among his more memorable performances were the title characters in King Lear, Volpone, Tartuffe, Richard II and Titus Andronicus, as well as such diverse roles as Prospero in The Tempest, James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night and Thomas More in A Man for All Seasons.
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