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TRAVEL
By Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
I'm wondering why planes detained on the tarmac don't use those emergency chutes to get everyone off and into the airport. It beats sitting in a seat for 11 hours. Why wouldn't they do that? The mental picture of newly freed hostages, uh, passengers, zipping down an emergency slide might bring a smile to your face, but such an exit is no laughing matter. "Essentially, using the emergency slides to deplane an aircraft moves customers from what is a well-controlled environment inside the aircraft to an uncontrolled airport environment outside," Sebastian White, manager of corporate communications for JetBlue, wrote in an e-mail.
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The small chartered medical jet landed at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport and taxied to a stop, and there on the tarmac, inside the jet, two men from Ohio were finally together in a state where they could wed. And that's exactly what they did. On Thursday morning, Jim Obergefell married his partner of more than 20 years, John Arthur, whose battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, has left him unable to travel except under special, medically-supported...
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Concourse D at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport was closed for about an hour Friday afternoon while police investigated a suspicious item in lower level airline space on Concourse D. The focus was in an airline office space located just off the tarmac — not in public areas, said airport spokesman Jonathan Dean. As a precaution, travelers were cleared from the airline gate area on Concourse D nearest the location and the security checkpoint was closed for a few minutes shortly after 4 p.m. to alleviate congestion in the concourse.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Concourse D at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport was closed for about an hour Friday afternoon while police investigated a suspicious item in lower level airline space on Concourse D. The focus was in an airline office space located just off the tarmac — not in public areas, said airport spokesman Jonathan Dean. As a precaution, travelers were cleared from the airline gate area on Concourse D nearest the location and the security checkpoint was closed for a few minutes shortly after 4 p.m. to alleviate congestion in the concourse.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | August 11, 2007
Passengers enraged by the hours they spent on a Continental Airlines jet on BWI airport's tarmac without food, water and toilet paper are joining a growing campaign to curb what they describe as "appalling and shameful" airline experiences. More than 120 people on Flight 1669Y were headed from Venezuela to Newark, N.J., on July 29 when a storm diverted their plane to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. When they finally got a respite in the airport terminal, they said, they were guarded by an "attack dog."
NEWS
December 28, 2009
Finally, the Obama administration has accomplished something that the public demanded: limit the time a plane can be on the tarmac before returning to the gate ("Stuck on the tarmac," Dec. 24). Let's recap what the public wanted vs. what the Obama administration wanted over the past year. Public wanted: No bailouts for the banks, no bailouts for Wall Street, no bailouts for the car industry, no bailouts for the insurance industry, no cash for clunkers, get out of Afghanistan, no to cap-and-trade, no to increasing the national debt, and the big one, no to messing with our great health care system.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2008
On the Friday after Christmas two years ago, more than 13,000 passengers - out of food, water and patience - were cooped up in planes that had been circling closed airports or idling on the tarmac for as long as 11 hours. The "flights from hell" launched consumer advocates and the air travel industries on a quest for a national bill of rights for fliers. But this season, travelers will be just as exposed as before to the whims of the weather, air traffic congestion and cash-strapped airlines.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
Airline passengers have been willing to put up with an awful lot in recent years. Squished-in seating, roulette wheel pricing, delayed or lost baggage, protracted security screening based on the latest terrorists' crackpot scheme - all were tolerated because to get someplace far away fast, there is no alternative to flying. But holding passengers hostage aboard planes stranded on tarmacs for as long as 10 hours - as though they were just so much cargo - exposed a level of insensitivity to human needs that cannot be excused.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | July 16, 2003
CHICAGO - Deep into this toddlin' town's night, on a wing and a prayer that one good All-Star Game could further resuscitate the sport formerly known as the national pastime, a first-time, pinch-hitting American League All-Star named Hank Blalock launched a homer. "A stud," Alex Rodriguez calls his young Texas Rangers third baseman teammate. What about savior? OK, maybe that's too strong a word, unless you consider the hand-wringing duress baseball commissioner Bud Selig might have displayed had something stirring not taken place on such a shimmering summer night, with so much expectation, not to mention so many heavy-handed Fox promos, riding on it. Ah, sweet deliverance.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | July 16, 2003
CHICAGO - It was one and done for Replacement Roger, after all that. So what's so different about Bud's Fan-tastic All-Star Game? As soon as Roger Clemens was announced to pitch the third inning of the 74th midsummer classic last night at U.S. Cellular Field, fellow American Leaguer Jamie Moyer was warming in the bullpen, ready to take over in the fourth. Then it was another Mariner, Shigetoshi Hasegawa, whom the National League feasted upon in the fifth, raising the questions: So where was Roger for three innings, or Mike Mussina or Pedro Martinez for that matter, if this time it counts?
NEWS
December 28, 2009
Finally, the Obama administration has accomplished something that the public demanded: limit the time a plane can be on the tarmac before returning to the gate ("Stuck on the tarmac," Dec. 24). Let's recap what the public wanted vs. what the Obama administration wanted over the past year. Public wanted: No bailouts for the banks, no bailouts for Wall Street, no bailouts for the car industry, no bailouts for the insurance industry, no cash for clunkers, get out of Afghanistan, no to cap-and-trade, no to increasing the national debt, and the big one, no to messing with our great health care system.
TRAVEL
By MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN and MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN,michelle.deal@baltsun.com | December 27, 2009
There was something in the air last weekend, and it wasn't just flakes of white. As President Barack Obama arrived home from the climate change conference aboard Air Force One, he was met by a serious change of climate in the Mid-Atlantic that prevented his helicopter from taking off and forced him to hit the road. Travel was pretty much a bust from ground to air. Greyhound, Amtrak, Southwest, AirTran - they all had problems. Hundreds of flights were canceled at BWI Marshall Airport and hundreds more as the storm rolled up the East Coast.
TRAVEL
By Catharine Hamm and Catharine Hamm,Los Angeles Times | February 22, 2009
I recently was on a flight that was scheduled to depart from New York's JFK at 6:45 p.m. but didn't take off until 11:45 p.m. We were held hostage on the airplane for several hours; no beverage or food service was offered. We were not allowed to buy food, nor were we allowed to exit the aircraft. Once we finally took off, we had only one beverage service. Food was available for purchase, but it ran out. The whole experience suggests we need a passenger bill of rights. What's the status of that legislation?
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2008
On the Friday after Christmas two years ago, more than 13,000 passengers - out of food, water and patience - were cooped up in planes that had been circling closed airports or idling on the tarmac for as long as 11 hours. The "flights from hell" launched consumer advocates and the air travel industries on a quest for a national bill of rights for fliers. But this season, travelers will be just as exposed as before to the whims of the weather, air traffic congestion and cash-strapped airlines.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | August 11, 2007
Passengers enraged by the hours they spent on a Continental Airlines jet on BWI airport's tarmac without food, water and toilet paper are joining a growing campaign to curb what they describe as "appalling and shameful" airline experiences. More than 120 people on Flight 1669Y were headed from Venezuela to Newark, N.J., on July 29 when a storm diverted their plane to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. When they finally got a respite in the airport terminal, they said, they were guarded by an "attack dog."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | May 26, 2007
It was probably an omen that the subject of luggage came up long before takeoff on a vacation flight when the gentleman of the house suggested the trendy new practice of shipping bags ahead. Contrary, as usual, the wife scoffed at such foolishness. Mailing suitcases to a Caribbean island! Bags must be kept close, she argued. New security rules make carry-on-only difficult, not least because they don't allow even a week's worth of sunscreen. Checking a bag, though, offered the silver lining of bringing along extra stuff.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen | July 10, 1994
Hemingway wannabes and fans have field day in Key WestErnest Hemingway aficionados in July will flock to the same place where the Nobel prize-winning novelist worked on "A Farewell to Arms" and a slew of short stories: the sultry Florida city of Key West, where Hemingway lived during most of the 1930s. The Hemingway Days Festival, now in its 13th year, is seven days of sun, fishing, drink and writing -- the same elements that sustained Hemingway.The festival is home to the Hemingway Days Writers' Workshop & Conference, which sponsors a storytelling contest and short story contest.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE -- After a 16-hour flight from Bahrain in a jetliner filled with balloons, pizza and haunting stories of shared experiences, the 21 former U.S. prisoners of war returned home yesterday to a heroes' welcome of cheers, tributes and waving flags -- and to their joyous families."
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