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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 2003
QARAQOSH, Iraq - On her living room wall she has a picture of Tariq Aziz meeting Pope John Paul II, but on this Easter Sunday she had few kind words for her nephew. "Let them arrest him," Selma Dawood said dismissively. "It's not important to me. What can I do with Tariq Aziz?" The blunt, baritone-voiced 75-year-old widow was speaking of the man identified here as her sister's son. He was deputy prime minister in President Saddam Hussein's government and, to Americans, he was Iraq's voice to the outside world through two gulf wars.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 2003
QARAQOSH, Iraq - On her living room wall she has a picture of Tariq Aziz meeting Pope John Paul II, but on this Easter Sunday she had few kind words for her nephew. "Let them arrest him," Selma Dawood said dismissively. "It's not important to me. What can I do with Tariq Aziz?" The blunt, baritone-voiced 75-year-old widow was speaking of the man identified here as her sister's son. He was deputy prime minister in President Saddam Hussein's government and, to Americans, he was Iraq's voice to the outside world through two gulf wars.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1992
UNITED NATIONS -- The United Nations has given Iraq until March 26 to come up with a detailed plan for destroying a long list of equipment and buildings used for constructing and repairing its banned ballistic missiles, according to U.N. officials and Western diplomats.The deadline, which carried at least an implicit threat of the use of force, was given last week to Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz, Iraq's special envoy here, by Rolf Ekeus, of Sweden, the chief of the special commission set up to oversee the elimination of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
January 7, 1991
U.S. Secretary of State James Baker is scheduled to meet Wednesday with Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz in perhaps the last diplomatic talks before a U.N.-imposed Jan. 15 deadline for Iraq to pull out of Kuwait. President Bush has said repeatedly that the United States will not negotiate with Iraq. Baker says this week's meeting represents a last chance for Iraq to understand that war is imminent and that the United States is not bluffing.The Evening Sun would like to hear your opinion of the diplomatic moves.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service WAR IN THE GULF | January 28, 1991
Who are these people with whom we are at war? It is difficul to generalize about 17 million people, but here, based on interviews with Arab experts, is a primer on Iraq -- the country and its people. Look for it daily in the Today section.ReligionMost of the 17 million Iraqis are Shiite Muslims; about 40 percent are Sunni Muslims, including Iraqi President Saddam Hussein. There is a tiny Jewish community, and 5 percent of Iraqis, including Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz, are Christian.
NEWS
December 17, 2002
BY MOST ACCOUNTS, the actor Sean Penn comported himself diplomatically during his visit to Baghdad last weekend. Apparently mindful of the disasters of earlier forays into enemy territory by other thespians -- most notably Jane Fonda's infamous 1972 journey to North Vietnam -- Mr. Penn kept his mouth shut for the most part, saying he had come to learn, not teach. Thank heavens for that. We don't contest Mr. Penn's freedom to attempt to understand for himself the oppression wrought by Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers | March 6, 1991
THE VIETNAM syndrome is over!" So proclaimed President Bush on Friday, March 1. He didn't need to tell Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, who had tried to fight that war all over again. In a strange way, the gulf war ended almost exactly as the Vietnam War did, just as Hussein claimed it would. But to his surprise, instead of playing the role of North Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh, as he intended, he found himself playing the role of South Vietnam's Nguyen Van Thieu.In October, 1972, U.S. national security adviser Henry A. Kissinger met with Thieu to present the U.S. proposals to end the Vietnam War. As The Baltimore Sun's Arnold Isaacs reported, Thieu commented bitterly that to the United States, South Vietnam was no more than a dot on the map. Its loss would mean little to the United States, which had its own strategies to pursue with Moscow and Peking.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration held out little optimism yesterday that a possible European Community mission to Baghdad would yield progress toward settling the Persian Gulf conflict, but an official said it could give Saddam Hussein a "fig leaf" to be more flexible on arranging direct talks with the United States."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | January 7, 1991
LONDON -- The European Community renewed its invitation yesterday to Iraqi Foreign Minister Tariq Aziz to visit Luxembourg for talks with European leaders after his scheduled meeting Wednesday with U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.Iraq turned down the EC's initial invitation, which was issued after a meeting of EC foreign ministers Friday, saying that European policy on the crisis was being dictated by Washington.Mr. Baker arrived here last night at the start of his European war-or-peace mission.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 13, 1991
CAIRO, Egypt -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III voiced confidence yesterday that the anti-Iraq coalition would stay intact if Israel retaliated against an attack by Iraq."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States renewed its circumspect encouragement of a Soviet bid to end the Persian Gulf war yesterday as the first fissure appeared in the Western anti-Iraq coalition, with a warning from Spain against bombing Iraqi cities.In a telephone call and subsequent written report, Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh told Secretary of State James A. Baker III that "there may be a gleam of hope" stemming from a visit to Baghdad by special envoy Yevgeny M. Primakov, the State Department said.
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