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NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
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NEWS
July 14, 2013
Reporter Arthur Hirsch 's article on the recent article on the re-enactment at the 150 t h anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg included a familiar Civil War anecdote about a Confederate soldier who had been captured at Fort Donelson ("A defining day relived," July 2). Responding to a question from his Union captors, he famously answered, "We're fighting because y'all are down here. " As a source of empirical evidence, this tale invites profoundly misleading interpretation: There is a duty to disclose the message actually intended by a Rebel who spoke his answer fully seven months before Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
Arthur Hirsch 's recent article about the Battle of Gettysburg reveals a disturbing ignorance of the political dynamics that brought this nation to a war that 150 years later remains the most cataclysmic event in our history ("A defining day relived," July 2). It accepts the shallow but unchallenged premise that the Civil War occurred because slavery was practiced in the South, and that righteous resolve to abolish the institution left the U.S. with no option other than a resort to arms.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | January 1, 1995
The Port of Baltimore enters the year hoping to continue its steady growth in cargo by capitalizing on last year's agreements liberalizing world trade.Both the North American Free Trade Agreement and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade accord are expected to increase trade in Baltimore and elsewhere by significantly reducing or eliminating tariffs."We're anticipating a positive impact at the port of Baltimore," said Michael P. Angelos, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, which oversees the state's five public marine terminals.
BUSINESS
By Detroit Free Press | October 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- U.S. steelmakers struck back this week against a push by the six largest automakers that assemble vehicles in the United States to end tariffs on certain types of imported steel. They warned that thousands of steel-making jobs could be at risk if the tariffs are lifted. The U.S. International Trade Commission will hear arguments as to whether tariffs on corrosion-resistant steel from six countries should end. The tariffs have been in place since 1993, after the steel industry accused foreign producers of dumping their products in the United States.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | June 16, 2005
ONLY A FEW economic historians are likely to notice that tomorrow marks the 75th anniversary of the signing of the Hawley-Smoot tariff bill, and even economic historians are unlikely to be nostalgic about that disastrous legislation. Why not leave the bad news of the past in the past? After all, we have our own problems today. Unfortunately, the same kind of thinking that led to the Hawley-Smoot tariffs is still alive and well - and in full youthful vigor - in the media and in politics today.
BUSINESS
By David Everett and David Everett,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The government ruled yesterday that Honda avoided an estimated $16.5 million in U.S. tariffs it should have paid on Canadian-built Civics sold in the United States.The U.S. Customs Service said that the Civics -- assembled by the Japanese automaker in Alliston, Ontario, and sold in the United States -- did not have enough North American content to be exempt from U.S. tariffs in 1989 and 1990.The reason, the agency said, is that an aluminum engine Honda builds in Ohio and installs in Canadian-made Civics is more than half foreign in content and value.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
U.S. steel interests reacted angrily yesterday to yet another round of products that are being exempted from the steel tariffs that the Bush administration imposed in March. The Department of Commerce and the Office of the United States Trade Representative announced yesterday another 178 products that will not be subject to the tariffs, which range from 8 percent to 30 percent. That brings the number of excluded products to 727 and covers 3.2 million metric tons of steel - nearly 25 percent of the 13.1 million metric tons of steel included in President Bush's March tariff order.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1996
In yet another effort to make the port of Baltimore more competitive, the Maryland Port Administration said yesterday it will not increase rates for steamship lines next year, despite moves by other East Coast ports to do so.The unexpected decision to hold the line on tariffs came just days after Baltimore dockworkers ratified a five-year contract that employers said was critical to retaining business at the struggling port and for attracting new cargo."
NEWS
October 15, 2011
Peter Morici's recent article provides an excellent synopsis of our relationship with China and its practice of mercantilism ("China currency bill: America fights back," Oct. 11). He lists GE and Caterpillar as U.S. companies salivating at the prospect of gaining access to China's massive developing market and willing to agree to Chinese demands for technology transfers through forced joint-venture arrangements with local companies. Congress' threats of tariffs and attacks on the Chinese yuan are a rerun of the Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930, which was a major cause of the Great Depression.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
The Baltimore City Council gave its final approval Thursday to a 2-cent tax on bottled beverages, bringing to an end months of heated debate on how to close Baltimore's largest budget gap in memory. The 2-cent tariff, which is set to expire in three years, represents a compromise between Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who had proposed a 4-cent tax, and council members who were pressured to oppose the tax by beverage distributors and store owners. Baltimore appears to be the only jurisdiction to pass a bottle tax this year.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | June 8, 2010
Democratic capitalism is in eclipse. From Berlin to Tokyo, governments struggle to instigate enough growth to pay their bills and gainfully employ workers. Meanwhile, anti-democratic but increasingly capitalistic China enjoys breakneck progress. Democratic capitalism is not flawed. Rather, government policymakers, through deceptions, delusions and abuse, are destroying a system that brought mankind from dark, feudal superstitions to cracking the secrets of life. Politicians from Athens to Sacramento — and yes, most certainly in Baltimore too — have deceived voters by telling them that pension systems can be constructed allowing retirement at ages 55 or 60. Whether funded by savings and investments or taxes, no solvent pension system is possible that permits educated professionals, unionized workers and government employees, who get most of the income and benefits, to work only 30 or 35 years and retire for another 20 or 25 years.
NEWS
By Jim Tankersley and Jim Tankersley,Tribune Newspapers | June 29, 2009
President Obama on Sunday called a House-passed energy bill "an extraordinary first step" toward halting global warming and reducing the use of fossil fuels, but he expressed reservations about a controversial provision that would slap tariffs on imports from countries that do not similarly crack down on greenhouse gas emissions. He predicted that the measure would spark innovation and jobs, and that its costs to consumers would fall well short of critics' warnings. "What seems contentious now is going to seem like common sense in hindsight," he told reporters in the Oval Office.
NEWS
By Robert M. Hathaway and Edward Gresser | September 26, 2008
Seven months ago, Pakistanis hoped elections would usher in a brighter era. Instead, skies are darkening. As President Asif Ali Zardari visited the United Nations and met with President Bush this week, Pakistan watchers worried that simultaneous political and economic crises are pushing the country toward disaster. In response, both the administration and its Democratic critics advocate a new round of foreign aid increases. But past aid increases have failed to achieve results. If we expect different results, we need a different approach: an economic policy built upon trade and job creation for Pakistan's people, not just aid to its soldiers and ministries.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2008
Chiquita Brands International Inc. Shares gained 44 cents, closing at $17.08. The produce distributor is poised to gain from a World Trade Organization ruling against the European Union's import tariffs for bananas.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,Chicago Tribune | December 15, 2006
In a move that cheered automakers but angered domestic steel producers, the U.S. International Trade Commission yesterday eliminated most of its controversial tariffs on carbon-steel imports. The independent federal agency's ruling ends an unusual, high-profile feud between two American smokestack industries battered by global competition, Big Steel and its major customer, the auto industry. The commission's action will lower the price auto companies pay for steel and bring a similar benefit to other major steel buyers, such as implement makers Caterpillar Inc. and Deere & Co. Those same lower steel prices promise to pressure profits at many American steel producers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration exempted yesterday 295 steel products from import tariffs levied a year ago, including wine-barrel strips for Illinois Tool Works Inc. and zinc-coated sheets that Sharp Corp. uses to make microwave ovens. The exclusions, which producers estimate represent 360,000 tons of imports, bring to 995 the products exempted from duties that are as high as 24 percent. A quarter of the 13 million tons of steel imports originally covered by the tariffs imposed by President Bush in March last year had been exempted in subsequent months, according to the Commerce Department.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,SUN REPORTER | November 22, 2007
Dealing a blow to a major Western Maryland manufacturer, the U.S. International Trade Commission decided not to slap tariffs on cheaper Asian paper imports. The 5-1 decision to overturn a decision by the Commerce Department to impose anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties on coated and glossy paper from China, Indonesia and South Korea could have repercussions for NewPage Corp.'s Luke paper mill, with 950 employees the largest manufacturing plant in Allegany County. NewPage had filed the complaint seeking punitive tariffs, claiming the imports were being illegally subsidized and sold at unfairly low prices.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,Sun reporter | July 18, 2007
LUKE, Md. -- China is 7,000 miles away from this speck of a town in the mountains, half a world away. But as a looming economic threat, the country has never seemed so stiflingly close. The paper mill here that employs 950 is feeling the pressure of cheaper Chinese imports. On New Year's Eve, it shut down one of its three huge manufacturing machines and cut 130 jobs, touching off rumors across the tri-state region where employees live that it was only a matter of time before the plant closed.
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