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By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
Abdoulaye Kasse sits hunched at his giant loom, his fingers flying across and through the strings as he weaves colorful wool strands into a tapestry.The 48-year-old Senegalese master weaver and tapestry maker has brought his 300-pound handmade loom from his west African homeland to Columbia's African Art Museum of Maryland, which is exhibiting 21 of his medium-size tapestries until March 8.This is Kasse's first visit to the United States and the first time...
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NEWS
May 15, 2014
The self-indulgent attitudes of the Carroll County Commissioners regarding public prayers at the start of their meetings are embarrassing and make no sense ( "Carroll commissioners resume practice of sectarian Christian prayer," May 13). The commissioners' assertion that religious prayer be an integral part of official government business is misguided. In this country we have freedom from religion as well as freedom of religion. The Carroll County Commissioners must fully appreciate the importance of providing an atmosphere that is entirely comfortable for those who prefer to see and hear the people's business conducted without the interweaving of a tapestry of worship.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2000
Attention, New Agers and others seeking spiritual sustenance through music: Tapestry, a Boston-based vocal ensemble of three women, will perform at St. John's College's McDowell Hall at 7 p.m. Sunday. This group's spiritual programming draws from a variety of sources. Its concerts abound with music of the medieval period, Eastern European folk songs and religious chants, Hebrew prayers, and contemporary fare. The group's recent compact disc, "The Fourth River: The Millennium Revealed" (Telarc 80534)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
Sometimes the only barrier separating a pastoral paradise from hell on earth is a thin line of birch trees. Before she died in 2001 at age 74, Frederick dressmaker Esther Krinitz created 36 oversized fabric panels that provide persuasive proof that both worlds exist - sometimes within the same frame. In scraps of fabric and cheerily colored yarns, the panels tell the story of how young Esther and her sister escaped from the Holocaust during the Nazi occupation of Poland during World War II. The panels went on display this weekend at the American Visionary Art Museum as part of a new exhibit, "The Art of Storytelling: Lies, Enchantment, Humor and Truth.
FEATURES
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1998
It looks like a toy boat made from yesterday's papers, a half-century old sheet of folded newsprint sailing away from the darkness of war toward the elusive light of peace.The image -- part of a 5-by-7-foot tapestry of nearly a million stitches -- represents "Exodus 1947," the Chesapeake Bay steamer from the Roaring '20s whose fate was pivotal in establishing the nation of Israel.The boat, and its reflection in the water below it, form the Star of David.The tapestry, designed by Russian artist Alex Gelfenboim, was unveiled last night at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 14, 1997
In many ways Tapestry -- formerly Tomcat Alley -- is very much like other Fells Point restaurants. The setting, particularly the bar, has lots of funky charm. (In fact, after this review, critics should be banned from ever using that phrase to describe a Fells Point bar-restaurant again.) The narrow dining room is appealing, although it won't sound like it when I describe the color scheme as acorn-squash yellow and dark green.On a Sunday night, with every table taken, there's one waiter and one cook.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | September 22, 1998
For the first time in 17 years, Scipio Africanus will again enter Rome in triumph -- on a huge Renaissance tapestry at the Peabody Institute.The 13-by-29-foot tapestry, called "The Triumphal Carriage," has been rehung, after extended conservation, in the recently refurbished Griswold Hall of the Peabody's main Mount Vernon Place building. It will be on view Sunday in conjunction with this weekend's Baltimore Book Festival.The tapestry, woven of silk, wool, gold and silver thread, is one of two the Peabody owns from a series of 22 tapestries called "The Triumph of Scipio."
NEWS
March 27, 1998
Brigitte Bledsoe and Tiffany Bowers, pictured in yesterday's Dining Out guide in LIVE, are no longer associated with Tapestry restaurant in Fells Point.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/27/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | May 23, 1996
A diet of fiberFrom the tapestry to the rug to the quilt to the basket to the saddle bag, the art of fiber spans civilizations around the world, from the earliest times to the present. "Fiber Artists Invitational," now at the Academy of the Arts in Easton, brings together 15 distinguished contemporary practitioners working in a variety of styles.Among them are tapestry weavers Archie Brennan and Helena Hernmarck; Norma Minkowitz, who creates crocheted sculptures; Betty Vera, whose impressionistic landscapes are rooted in her background in painting; Ruth Manning, whose work features scenes of the city; and Sandra Brownlee, who calls her weavings "tactile drawings."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1996
Tonight, as the midnight hour approaches, the parishioners of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Highlandtown will gather in a darkened church."Come, receive the light, the unwaning light," the Rev. Manuel J. Burdusi will chant in Greek as he lights the paschal candle from the eternal vigil light at the tabernacle. The flame will spread and multiply as each person in the church lights a small candle, a glow filling the room, illuminating the icons along the front of the sanctuary.Thus St. Nicholas, in the heart of Baltimore's Greek community, begins its celebration of the Resurrection of Jesus in a ritual handed down over nearly two millenniums.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Outhouses. Potbellied stoves. Four-mile walks in the snow. These are legacies of the Rosenwald Schools. For the past several weeks, county students have been studying the schools, a loosely affiliated network for African-American children that a white businessman, Julius Rosenwald, helped start with a grant in 1917. Twenty-three would spring up in Anne Arundel County alone. But what fascinated history students at North County High School in Glen Burnie and Southern High School in Harwood were the minutiae -- where children went to the bathroom, how they stayed warm and got to school, and what their classrooms looked like.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
They sit hunched over a single needlepoint canvas that is bathed in astoundingly bright light, fingers flying. "Where am I? My needle is under here," Joy Wiley of Lothian says to herself as she stops to examine her work while feeling around beneath the canvas for her dangling yarn and needle. "We hate these tails," says Sheryn Blocher of Crownsville with a sigh, glaring at what look like weeds standing up from the canvas. She will imperceptibly secure the base of each wisp of yarn, or tail, before trimming it away.
FEATURES
October 23, 2009
Paris *** ( 3 STARS) Juliette Binoche and Paris - what more do you want? In this multicharacter cinematic tapestry of the City of Light, Binoche plays the social-worker sister of an ailing former chorus boy. She cares for him while he waits to get the call for a heart transplant. They provide the core story for a film that fans out to embrace diverse locations as well as vividly contrasting characters such as hearty produce vendors and neurotic academics. It's overlong and erratic, but it's filled with perfect moments, including a confrontation between Binoche and her co-workers that provides a rare cinematic reflection of the potential tyranny of egalitarianism.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 5, 2007
Darryl Savage shoots photographs from peculiar angles. While riding a ferris wheel in Paris, he snapped a picture of the Eiffel Tower. Then in Nice, he held his Nikon camera out the window and took pictures of trees as he drove by. "I try to take photographs from angles no one else sees," Savage said. Savage took his hobby to the next level when he opened his first show - an exhibit of about 50 photographs that depict New York City and Europe - at the 49 West Coffeehouse in Annapolis.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
Daniel Mendelsohn, whose autobiographical book The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million won a National Book Critics Circle Award last week, will speak today at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. Mendelsohn's book chronicles his quest to uncover the fate of his great-uncle Shmiel Jager; Shmiel's wife, Ester; and their daughters: Lorka, Frydka, Ruchele and Bronia. The six were living in the small town of Bolechow, in what is now Ukraine, during World War II. All six perished in the Holocaust.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | January 28, 2007
The red zone You'll be seeing red at the Textile Museum in Washington. The new exhibit Red, on display Friday-July 8, will blanket the museum with red textiles and photographs and will showcase the many uses and meanings of the bold color in clothing and fabrics around the globe and throughout the ages. Textiles on view come from the museum's collection of about 17,000 items and include a 6th-century Egyptian fragment, a 19th-century Navajo rug, a 1970s Halston ball gown, the current self-portrait tapestry Tommy USA by Thomas Cronenberg (shown at right)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 25, 1997
Eager to pleaseHere's a novel solution to the downtown parking problem. When you call to make reservations at the newly reopened Eager House (15 W. Eager St., 410-547-8300), you can order limousine pickup for another $25. (If that doesn't interest you, there is valet parking.)In its most recent incarnation, the Eager House is aiming for the expense-account and special-night-out crowd. The menu features classic Continental cuisine like steak Diane, chateaubriand, rack of lamb, lobster and bananas Foster.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
The self-indulgent attitudes of the Carroll County Commissioners regarding public prayers at the start of their meetings are embarrassing and make no sense ( "Carroll commissioners resume practice of sectarian Christian prayer," May 13). The commissioners' assertion that religious prayer be an integral part of official government business is misguided. In this country we have freedom from religion as well as freedom of religion. The Carroll County Commissioners must fully appreciate the importance of providing an atmosphere that is entirely comfortable for those who prefer to see and hear the people's business conducted without the interweaving of a tapestry of worship.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
HE HAS BEEN THE WORKing man's interviewer for longer than one can remember without looking it up. Author and oral historian Louis "Studs" Terkel -- he of summer heart surgery, he who gave us Working -- now is treating readers to his childhood passion: music. And They All Sang (New Press) is Terkel's 16th book but his first collection of interviews mined from his storied career as a disc jockey. "As an asthmatic child of eight, hearing came to me with much more ease than breathing. Bound to the hearth, I heard music I might otherwise have missed," Terkel, 93, wrote in the book's introduction.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2005
"I always wanted to be tucked in the woods," said Donna Denison, a 54-year-old Dundalk native, as she looked out her kitchen window onto brick walkways, tall trees and flowering shrubs. The dream began to take shape in 1975, when she and her husband, Dave Denison - now 57 and a retired project engineer for Bechtel Corp. - purchased a wooded lot off the beaten path in Carroll County. For a price tag of $16,000, they took possession of their 2 1/2 -acre wooded parcel. Three years later, contractors began work on a brick-and-siding Cape Cod home.
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