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By GAIL FORMAN | September 12, 1993
Tapenade, the aromatic capers-and-olive spread of Provence, is bound to become a favorite in this country as it is in the South of France. Its intense flavor, versatility and healthfulness have already charmed the gastronomically adventurous among us.People usually first encounter it in restaurants, where the paste serves as a butter substitute for fresh or toasted French baguettes and bread sticks. Then, at home, they discover how easy tapenade is to prepare and how many ways there are to use it.The name tapenade comes from the ancient Provencal word for the caper, tapena.
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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Hauteur loiters in the American ear around anything French, but perhaps this book can clarify brasserie. However the term has been appropriated by eating establishments over the years, it literally means brewery or perhaps more loosely, brew pub. The simple joys of the table that these terms imply find eloquent expression in American Brasserie by Rick Tramonto and Gale Gand with Julia Moskin (Wiley Publishing Inc., 2002, $21.95), which perhaps not coincidentally is printed on rough-textured paper.
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By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | March 16, 1994
Tapenade -- that delicious Provencal-style olive spread -- is one of those dishes that successfully captures the sunny flavors of the Mediterranean.Although you see it popping up as a tangy appetizer in many trendy restaurants, it's fast and easy to make at home, especially if you have a food processor.There are umpteen variations, but the basic ingredients are fairly consistent: olives (either black or green or a combination), capers, garlic, olive oil and anchovies. Some chefs like to add fresh herbs, such as thyme leaves, minced rosemary, Italian parsley or basil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 2001
A COMMON Ground is a restaurant critic's nightmare, because there's nothing about it to criticize other than its not having a liquor license. The food is consistently excellent. The service is fine, too; cheerful servers take orders at the counter and then deliver food to the tables. As far as atmosphere goes, no complaints there, either. The shabby-chic concept was invented for this comfortable rowhouse overlooking Hampden's 36th Street. After lunch, if it's nice outside, settle down on the glider on the porch.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1996
This delicious variation on tapenade requires no cooking and can be used in any number of dishes. Tapenade, which originated in Provence, France, is basically a paste of olives, capers, anchovies and garlic.Our fresh tomato version of tapenade can be used on pasta as well as seafood, poultry, eggs or even potatoes.Top the salad with a selection of beans (maybe from a supermarket's salad bar) for variety and nutrition.Our delectable dessert turns out to be as simple as an assembly; again no cooking necessary.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2001
"What is this stuff?" When the fourth friend posed the same question during a restaurant review, I knew a remedial lesson was in order. The "stuff" is tapenade, and it is everywhere these days. It also is delicious. Tapenade is a spread traditionally made with black olives, anchovies, capers and olive oil. The ingredients are pureed and slathered on crusty bread as an appetizer. The spread originated in the sunny south of France, where the fixings are readily available. You probably won't find classic tapenade in many restaurants, though.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 31, 1999
For more than three years my talented culinary assistant, Charles Worthington, has spent hours helping me create and test recipes for this column. He is a gifted cook, so it was not a surprise to me when recently he was offered a major position at a national magazine halfway across the country. I and many of his other friends and colleagues wanted to give him a going-away party where he was the guest, and we did the cooking.After many phone calls, we settled on a date and a format. The fete would be a cocktail party, and each of us would bring an appetizer to share.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 2001
A COMMON Ground is a restaurant critic's nightmare, because there's nothing about it to criticize other than its not having a liquor license. The food is consistently excellent. The service is fine, too; cheerful servers take orders at the counter and then deliver food to the tables. As far as atmosphere goes, no complaints there, either. The shabby-chic concept was invented for this comfortable rowhouse overlooking Hampden's 36th Street. After lunch, if it's nice outside, settle down on the glider on the porch.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2003
Hauteur loiters in the American ear around anything French, but perhaps this book can clarify brasserie. However the term has been appropriated by eating establishments over the years, it literally means brewery or perhaps more loosely, brew pub. The simple joys of the table that these terms imply find eloquent expression in American Brasserie by Rick Tramonto and Gale Gand with Julia Moskin (Wiley Publishing Inc., 2002, $21.95), which perhaps not coincidentally is printed on rough-textured paper.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 28, 1998
THERE ARE SEVERAL ways to describe a dish that doesn't quite measure up to your expectations.One is to call it "a work in progress." Another is to say it needs "fine-tuning" or that "some tinkering is required."All these euphemisms were trotted out the other night as my wife and I analyzed the dish of roasted cod topped with a sun-dried tomato tapenade that we had cooked for dinner. It was pretty good. But we were expecting it to be better. The fish was fine, but the tapenade tasted slightly off. Too peppery, a bit acidic.
FEATURES
By Jane Snow and Jane Snow,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 21, 2001
"What is this stuff?" When the fourth friend posed the same question during a restaurant review, I knew a remedial lesson was in order. The "stuff" is tapenade, and it is everywhere these days. It also is delicious. Tapenade is a spread traditionally made with black olives, anchovies, capers and olive oil. The ingredients are pureed and slathered on crusty bread as an appetizer. The spread originated in the sunny south of France, where the fixings are readily available. You probably won't find classic tapenade in many restaurants, though.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 31, 1999
For more than three years my talented culinary assistant, Charles Worthington, has spent hours helping me create and test recipes for this column. He is a gifted cook, so it was not a surprise to me when recently he was offered a major position at a national magazine halfway across the country. I and many of his other friends and colleagues wanted to give him a going-away party where he was the guest, and we did the cooking.After many phone calls, we settled on a date and a format. The fete would be a cocktail party, and each of us would bring an appetizer to share.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 28, 1998
THERE ARE SEVERAL ways to describe a dish that doesn't quite measure up to your expectations.One is to call it "a work in progress." Another is to say it needs "fine-tuning" or that "some tinkering is required."All these euphemisms were trotted out the other night as my wife and I analyzed the dish of roasted cod topped with a sun-dried tomato tapenade that we had cooked for dinner. It was pretty good. But we were expecting it to be better. The fish was fine, but the tapenade tasted slightly off. Too peppery, a bit acidic.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 1996
This delicious variation on tapenade requires no cooking and can be used in any number of dishes. Tapenade, which originated in Provence, France, is basically a paste of olives, capers, anchovies and garlic.Our fresh tomato version of tapenade can be used on pasta as well as seafood, poultry, eggs or even potatoes.Top the salad with a selection of beans (maybe from a supermarket's salad bar) for variety and nutrition.Our delectable dessert turns out to be as simple as an assembly; again no cooking necessary.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | March 16, 1994
Tapenade -- that delicious Provencal-style olive spread -- is one of those dishes that successfully captures the sunny flavors of the Mediterranean.Although you see it popping up as a tangy appetizer in many trendy restaurants, it's fast and easy to make at home, especially if you have a food processor.There are umpteen variations, but the basic ingredients are fairly consistent: olives (either black or green or a combination), capers, garlic, olive oil and anchovies. Some chefs like to add fresh herbs, such as thyme leaves, minced rosemary, Italian parsley or basil.
NEWS
By Lauren Ritchie of The Sentinel Staff | October 24, 1993
It is the soul of summer, it is the sense of the Mediterranean, it is the south of France in a dish. It's tapenade, a rich, heady paste of olives, garlic, olive oil, capers, herbs and sometimes other ingredients that can be a spread, a dip, a condiment, a baste, or an ingredient in other dishes.A couple of years ago, few people had even heard of tapenade, but it was among the most prevalent items at the recent Fancy Food Show in New York City.For some local chefs and specialty food purveyors, however, their first taste of tapenade was in the Mediterranean.
NEWS
By Lauren Ritchie of The Sentinel Staff | October 24, 1993
It is the soul of summer, it is the sense of the Mediterranean, it is the south of France in a dish. It's tapenade, a rich, heady paste of olives, garlic, olive oil, capers, herbs and sometimes other ingredients that can be a spread, a dip, a condiment, a baste, or an ingredient in other dishes.A couple of years ago, few people had even heard of tapenade, but it was among the most prevalent items at the recent Fancy Food Show in New York City.For some local chefs and specialty food purveyors, however, their first taste of tapenade was in the Mediterranean.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1995
Q: Can you tell me what it means to bake blind?A: Bake blind is the technique for baking an unfilled pastry shell. The shell is first pricked with a fork to prevent puffing, covered with aluminum foil or parchment paper and then weighted with aluminum or ceramic pie weights, rice or beans. The pastry shell is baked for 10 to 15 minutes to set. The weights and foil are then removed and the shell is baked as needed.Q: I now see microwave ovens with metal interiors and metal racks. How is that possible since we are not supposed to use metal in the microwave?
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | September 12, 1993
Tapenade, the aromatic capers-and-olive spread of Provence, is bound to become a favorite in this country as it is in the South of France. Its intense flavor, versatility and healthfulness have already charmed the gastronomically adventurous among us.People usually first encounter it in restaurants, where the paste serves as a butter substitute for fresh or toasted French baguettes and bread sticks. Then, at home, they discover how easy tapenade is to prepare and how many ways there are to use it.The name tapenade comes from the ancient Provencal word for the caper, tapena.
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