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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2000
The man who has spent his life helping America remember believes that the country has succumbed to "national Alzheimer's" disease. All information, little knowledge. And scant wisdom. "We don't remember anything. There's no yesterday in this country, and I want to re-create those yesterdays," says Studs Terkel, the dean of oral historians whose adventures with a tape recorder have secured the life lessons of hobos, soldiers and losers for all time. "The free market is God now, but we forgot what happened in the 1930s -- that people were crying for the government to save their asses and that the people who condemn government [regulation]
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | September 26, 2012
Michael Oher strolled into the Ravens' locker room, looked at the sheet of paper taped to one wall and let loose a string of epithets that would make an entire convent faint. The draw for the next cornhole tournament had just been posted. And the big left tackle didn't like what he saw. "Morgan and I won the last one," punter Sam Koch explained to a visitor, referring to long-snapper Morgan Cox. "We beat him and (Joe) Flacco. Just crushed them. " The visitor wanted to know the score.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 11, 1998
When most people think of the Royal Shakespeare Company they envision large-scale productions of Shakespearean plays. But as part of its residency at Washington's Kennedy Center, on June 17 and 19 the RSC is presenting Edward Petherbridge in Samuel Beckett's one-man tour-de-force, "Krapp's Last Tape."Best known for his portrayal of the title role in the British TV series, "Lord Peter Whimsey," Petherbridge co-directed Beckett's 1958 play with David Hunt. In the existential drama, he shares the stage with a tape recorder on which Krapp recorded his thoughts three decades ago.Show times for "Krapp's Last Tape," in the Terrace Theater at Kennedy Center, off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues N.W., Washington, are 6 p.m. June 17 and 19. Tickets are $15. Call 800-444-1324.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - As George W. Bush was first moving onto the national political stage, he often turned for advice to an old friend who secretly taped some of their private conversations, creating a rare record of the future president as a politician and personality. In the past several weeks, that friend, Doug Wead, an author and former aide to Bush's father, disclosed the tapes' existence to a reporter and played about a dozen of them. Variously earnest, confident or prickly in those conversations, Bush weighs the political risks and benefits of his religious faith, discusses campaign strategy and comments on rivals.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1998
As Glenda Schwandtner sees it, all that stands between justice and her brother's long-unsolved killing is a tiny number a Baltimore County police officer neglected to glue onto a tape recorder.The trial of John S. Derry, 44, on first-degree murder charges in the 1978 killing of 22-year-old Mark S. Schwandtner has been derailed because police left the identification number off a tape recorder used for an alleged confession. In a pretrial ruling, a judge threw out key evidence -- a secretly made tape of Derry -- because the number wasn't "affixed," as specified by state law.Now, a county prosecutor says that unless he can overturn a judge's ruling on the issue, Derry will go free.
FEATURES
May 8, 2003
The day after their baby was born, Sgt. Dwayne Stone called his wife from Iraq. The Red Cross had awakened him, at 3 a.m., to deliver the news. He had wanted to call for several hours, but it took a while to catch up with the sergeant major who had Delta Company's one phone. "I love you," Dwayne told Deiry. Then he wanted to know everything there was to know about Deseray. "How big is she?" "How long is she?" "Who does she look like?" "Does she have my lips?" "Does she have my eyes?"
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 31, 1996
A lawyer yesterday continued her attempt to keep a jury from hearing Rene Elizabeth Aulton's confession in the fiery deaths of her daughters, suggesting that Baltimore police who interviewed Ms. Aulton might have influenced her story.Prosecutors on Monday played tapes of statements Ms. Aulton made to police on three occasions after the fire in her Canton rowhouse Nov. 15, 1994. On the final tape, Ms. Aulton told detectives she set the blaze to kill herself and her daughters, ages 2 and 4, because she was depressed about a former boyfriend's possible release from prison.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | August 20, 1994
James Taylor didn't sing at the original Woodstock. Hard to have imagined "Fire and Rain" or "Sweet Baby James" going over big with the mud set. James Taylor didn't sing at Woodstock last week, either.James sings tonight at Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia. I'll be there on the lawn because this is what I do. We must maintain our passionate habits. James Taylor is my habit.I've seen his act before. Eight times. Oct. 25, 1975, was the first time. He sang at the University of Florida's gym, which had all the acoustics and comfort of a rain gutter.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | January 7, 1993
Eric Shain thought shorthand sounded like a good class for his senior year.The 17-year-old high school student wants to study medicine at the University of Florida."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 9, 1990
Philips NV, the Dutch electronics company that created the cassette tape, announced yesterday that it is developing a digital tape recorder that also will be able to play conventional analog cassette tapes.The new system, called the digital compact cassette, could pose a strong challenge to the digital audio tape recorders that have gone on sale recently. Those machines cannot play the cassettes that have been used by consumers in millions of home and car audio systems and in portable stereos with headsets.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2005
Vincent Papsan reminisced about his first date with his wife-to-be, Thelma, and how he was a laundryman for the Navy stationed in Hawaii during World War II. Geraldine Cookerly remembered growing up in a coal miner's camp in the hills of Kentucky and how she always kept her nose tucked in a book. And John M. Holzinger recalled eating the sour beef and dumplings his mother made when he was a boy and earning $5 a week at his first job making sheet metal. A handful of seniors at Jenkins Senior Living Community in Southwest Baltimore opened up their collective memories yesterday as part of an oral history project designed to document stories that haven't necessarily been forgotten - but that, these days, are rarely told.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 25, 2004
No one on television does show business biography better than PBS' American Masters series. Tonight, American Masters revisits the life of Judy Garland, one of the greatest concert hall performers we have ever known, and it is two hours of pop culture bliss. It's not a perfect biography. In fact, some might argue it's not even a biography if the word is meant to include a critical study of a life or career. There is little criticism here. American Masters' Judy Garland: By Myself is an appreciation of her fabulous career from vaudeville to MGM films, and the concert stages of America and Europe.
FEATURES
May 8, 2003
The day after their baby was born, Sgt. Dwayne Stone called his wife from Iraq. The Red Cross had awakened him, at 3 a.m., to deliver the news. He had wanted to call for several hours, but it took a while to catch up with the sergeant major who had Delta Company's one phone. "I love you," Dwayne told Deiry. Then he wanted to know everything there was to know about Deseray. "How big is she?" "How long is she?" "Who does she look like?" "Does she have my lips?" "Does she have my eyes?"
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A federal immigration judge who presides over sensitive visa and deportation cases sought a financial partnership with a Virginia firm whose clients could end up before him in court, according to a tape recording seized in a government raid. Judge D. Anthony Rogers' conduct appears to violate federal conflict of interest regulations and prompted a memo in March from an investigator for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service expressing exasperation that Rogers remains on the bench in Dallas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
Vernon L. Welsh, a founder of the Left Bank Jazz Society whose recordings of the society's Famous Ballroom concerts captured some of the greatest names in jazz, died Thursday of dementia at St. Elizabeth Rehabilitation Center in Southwest Baltimore. He was 83. Mr. Welsh and Benny Kearse, who died in 1999, established the Left Bank Jazz Society in 1964. The society not only showcased local jazz musicians, but brought such legendary jazz artists as Stan Getz, Julian "Cannonball" Adderly, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Dave Brubeck, Duke Ellington and Maynard Ferguson to Baltimore, where they performed to sold-out crowds at the Famous Ballroom on Charles Street.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Sixth-grader Loren Nelson had heard about Jim Crow, but it wasn't until she interviewed her grandparents -- and heard stories of segregated bathrooms, "white" and "colored" water fountains and hotels that didn't allow blacks -- that she understood what it meant. As part of an oral history project at Baltimore's Midtown Academy, the 11-year-old and 65 of her classmates have been learning firsthand about the institutionalized discrimination that other city pupils have only read about in books.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | September 19, 1991
"Boy, the tingles are running up and down my spine."Tense and excited, the broadcaster's voice conveyed a magic moment in baseball. With two down in the bottom of the ninth, Chicago White Sox pitcher Wilson Alvarez was one out shy of no-hitting the Orioles.Ear glued to a tape recorder, David Brooks, a Baltimore Orioles broadcasting intern, grimaced, then grinned at the sound of his own voice."Here's the pitch, here it comes. Swung on and missed. A no-hitter! Wilson Alvarez has thrown a no-hitter.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2002
A 48-year-old plumber was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison for his role in the 1978 murder of a Towson construction worker who was beaten, thrown from a railroad trestle and drowned in the Gunpowder Falls. John S. Derry of the 3300 block of Beech Ave. in Baltimore told Baltimore County Circuit Judge John G. Turnbull II that he has spent the 24 years since Mark Schwandtner was killed trying to help people and working to support his family. "I have been a changed person," Derry said.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
Taped conversations in a suspected murder-for-hire plot are so poor in quality that allowing jurors to hear them might make a difference in the case for his client, a defense attorney argued in Carroll County Circuit Court yesterday. Leonard H. Shapiro, who is defending a college professor accused of plotting to kill her ex-husband, also argued that giving the jury a transcript of the tapes would be unfair because it is sometimes difficult to tell who is speaking on the tape. He argued that jurors should decide for themselves what is on the tape.
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