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By Dr. Simeon Margolis | March 19, 1991
Q: I have heard that there is a lot of sodium or salt in tap water. Is that true? How much sodium is in a glass of water? I would also like to know how potassium works in the body and what foods are high in potassium.A: The sodium content of water depends somewhat on its source. For example, well water may contain more sodium than the surface water supplying Baltimore City and Baltimore County, where the amount of sodium in tap water is quite low -- approximately 2 milligrams per cup of water.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Water restrictions remain in place at the Hanover Square Apartments in Otterbein, where one resident was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease in mid-July, according to the city's Health Department. The July 18 case is the only one associated with the 1 West Conway Street tower, where the city is monitoring efforts to test and clear the water, said Health Department spokesman Michael Schwartzberg. He said he did not have more information about the patient's status. Legionnaires' disease, a type of pneumonia, spreads through the inhalation of tiny droplets of contaminated water.
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NEWS
By Nelson Schwartz and Nelson Schwartz,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Health officials warned nearly 1 million Washington-area residents yesterday that their tap water could be contaminated and must be boiled for safe drinking -- an announcement that sparked a frantic stampede to grocery stores for bottled water.EPA officials and the city's health commissioner, Mohammad N. Ahkter, urged residents of Washington to boil drinking water for a minimum of one minute as a precautionary measure until Monday. Virginia officials recommended boiling water for 10 minutes.
NEWS
July 2, 2014
People have been making a great deal of a Gallup poll earlier this year showing that 47 percent of Marylanders would move out of the state if they could ( "Maryland's unhappy residents," May 9). Some politicians and commentators have suggested that the reason Marylanders want to leave is our taxes. In fact, Gallup helpfully provided information about the reasons people have for wanting to leave the state, which should have been better reported in the news. Of the 17 percent of residents who are actually planning to leave, only 8 percent cite taxes as their primary reason.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Beginning next year, all Americans would be told what is in their tap water and how safe it is to drink, under a program proposed yesterday by the Environmental Protection Agency.Moving to implement a key element of the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clinton administration proposed regulations that would require water companies to tell consumers at least once a year where their water comes from, the chemicals and bacteria that are in it and the potential health hazards of the contaminants.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | October 11, 2005
Concern about the safety of Westminster's water supply after the weekend's heavy rains prompted a warning yesterday for city residents to boil tap water used for drinking or cooking, and the county schools superintendent ordered the closing of some Westminster-area public schools for today. The heavy rainfall caused high turbidity, or cloudiness, which was discovered by county water officials, Westminster Mayor Thomas K. Ferguson said last night. The Carroll County Health Department reported its findings to the Maryland Department of the Environment, which advised officials to issue the advisory late yesterday afternoon to boil tap water.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
Walkersville-area residents got their first untroubled sip from the tap yesterday, more than two weeks after a sewage spill contaminated the Frederick County town's water supply.Officials announced that the 7,500 residents on the municipal water system no longer need to boil water before drinking. An emergency hookup to the city of Frederick's water supply has supplanted the town's tainted wells.A temporary pipeline connecting Walkerville's water system to Frederick's Monocacy water treatment plant was finished June 27. Town officials have been busy since then flushing out their lines to remove bacteria.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1997
Health inspectors will begin testing private drinking-water wells in Anne Arundel County this month hoping to find out why the county has one of the highest cancer death rates in the state.County, state and federal officials will spend about four months checking tap water at about 50 homes in the county for pesticides, industrial chemicals and other compounds believed to cause cancer."So far, they haven't found anything out of the ordinary with our water supply," said Richard Dixon, regional manager for water operations at the county's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
More than 100 customers in the Freedom District water system say their tap water has turned yellow in the last few days. But county officials have told worried callers that the discoloration does not pose a health threat.The problem is that silt from Liberty Reservoir, the water source for about 6,000 homes in South Carroll, is rising in a seasonal act of nature. The yellow tint comes from a harmless chemical, manganese."The water is discolored, but there is no health hazard," said Wayne Lewns, chief of the county bureau of utilities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 21, 1997
PHILADELPHIA -- A study of tap water in Philadelphia from 1989 to 1993 has linked small increases in cloudiness, or turbidity, to gastrointestinal infections that cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea in children.Heightened turbidity can indicate microbial contamination, and even though turbidity levels in Philadelphia never exceeded federal limits during the study, the researchers said their findings suggested that tap water might be the source of millions of cases of unexplained illness all over the nation that people now attribute to food poisoning or unknown causes.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Kavita Shukla was 8, she designed a cage cleaner for her pet rabbit, Monet. Removing the cage's tray to empty bunny pellets and food scraps was difficult and messy, and the third-grader was determined to improve on its design. β€œI came up with this accordion-like device with a shovel and pipe cleaners,” she says, laughing at the memory. β€œIt's so funny to think of that now,” reflects Shukla, who is now 29 and the creative mind behind FreshPaper. Hailed worldwide as a revolutionary product that slows spoilage of fresh fruits and vegetables, her invention is being promoted as having the potential to impact global food waste.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 12, 2013
I'm a sucker for Baltimore-themed cocktails. I'm compelled to order them, in fact, no matter how unusual, random or potentially deadly they may turn out to be. So obviously, when I spotted Boyle's Baltimore Water on the menu at the Chasseur in Canton, I had to give it a go. And? Well, who knew a drink lovingly named after the infamy of our Mobtown tap water could taste so delicious? Bar manager Michael Zabora takes a rather cheeky approach to paying homage to our fair city. "I started making the drink a few years ago, when [Pinnacle Red Berry vodka]
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
Ice, salt and rigorous shaking can turn an ounce of nondairy creamer into a frozen treat. "It's simple, sweet and a little silly," Garrett Seidman, a junior at the Hannah More School in Reisterstown, said as he sampled a dab of ice-solid French vanilla cream. "But I like it. " Ice cream making was among the demonstrations during the second annual Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) Fair, held last week at the private school for children with autism and other emotional and learning disabilities.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
The O'Malley administration has decided to stop buying bottled water for state facilities where tap water is available, saying it's striking a blow for frugality and the environment at the same time. The state's "Green Purchasing Committee," formed last year to steer the government toward buying more healthful and environmentally friendly goods and services, voted Thursday to phase out the use of bottled water in state offices and other facilities, officials said. The move was hailed by environmentalists, who said Maryland's was the sixth state government to "kick the bottle," as they put it, joining Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Colorado and Illinois.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Several hundred people got a new perspective on the Loch Raven Reservoir Sunday, watching the Gunpowder River pour over the spillway as they stood on the dam itself, just a few yards from the water. It was the Baltimore Department of Public Works' third Loch Raven Day, one day a year when the public is invited into an otherwise off-limits area for the unusual view. "It's awesome," said Dave Wilmot, a fire safety engineer from Lutherville, expressing a sentiment heard often during the unexpectedly sunny afternoon that drew families outdoors.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | March 9, 2008
My sister and I are planning to spend one week each in Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan. What points of interest are must-sees? Two weeks might seem like a lot, but for cities the size of Tokyo and Kyoto, especially given their histories and culture, you'll have to squeeze a lot into a little time. Tokyo is the country's political and economic center, but a visit to Asakusa district will give you a feel for a more traditional Japan. You'll see the city's most famous and popular temple, Sensoji, which was built in the seventh century, and the Asakusa Shrine.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1996
Everyone at the Carroll Springs School is hoping that tomorrow brings an answer -- instead of more questions -- about what makes the hot tap water in Rooms 12 and 9 smell like rubbing alcohol."
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
As many as 20 Walkersville households have reported symptoms that might be related to sewage-contaminated tap water, although no positive link to a recent sewer-line break has been established, Frederick County health officials said yesterday.Ellen B. Ristorcelli, director of nursing for the county Health Department, said her staff is collecting stool samples to test at a state laboratory for the presence of one of two microscopic parasites -- giardia or cryptosporidium.Contamination concerns stem from the June 18 break that spilled 900,000 gallons of raw sewage into the ground and contaminated the source of drinking water for more than 7,000 people in the Walkersville area.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 13, 2007
Please note: A gunman killed eight shoppers then himself in a mall in Omaha, Neb., on Dec. 5, but no one killed anyone in Baltimore that day. In fact, we went five days without a shooting in Baltimore, from the evening of Dec. 2 until the afternoon of Dec. 7. There were no homicides from Dec. 4 through Dec. 10. Excuse me while I find this remarkable.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2007
This week's drizzle and fog notwithstanding, a continuing scarcity of rain in Maryland has spurred Baltimore water authorities to order that 50 million gallons be drawn daily from the Susquehanna River to supplement ebbing supplies in the city's three reservoirs. Acting Public Works Director Shirley A. Williams also called for water conservation, asking 1.8 million water customers in the city and surrounding counties to voluntarily cut their water consumption by 5 percent. That might mean shortening showers by a minute or two, waiting for full loads before using the washer and dishwasher, and closing the tap while shaving or brushing teeth.
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