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Tanzania

NEWS
May 10, 1994
The rush of a quarter-million or more Rwandans across the Kagera River to sanctuary in Tanzania strains the ability of world refugee, health and food organizations to cope. Fortunately, a relief infrastructure of sorts exists there, because of previous migrations from neighboring Burundi. But it is the remotest part of Tanzania, with poor transportation and no facilities for the camps that need to be established until the people can go home.The last refugee wave from Rwanda, a generation ago, fled to Uganda.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
These days, most scientists don't worry about being denounced as witches, vampires or body snatchers. Sarah Tishkoff is an exception. In the course of her DNA research travels around Africa, she has been accused of these offenses and more. One tribe in Tanzania refused to let her into their village. "They thought that white people were coming to steal their children, or to kill them, or to take their body parts or their blood," Tishkoff recalled. "And I did want to take their blood. So, then it's really scary."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
A small service club in Westminster is helping to eradicate an illness that is devastating remote villages in the United Republic of Tanzania. Bonds Meadow Rotary Club, which has 70 members, has dedicated its resources to fighting river blindness in the East African country of 50 million for nearly three years, making the battle against what many call a debilitating scourge its signature project. In a meeting yesterday in Westminster, the group celebrated with Tanzanian officials - who are in Washington this week for an international conference on river blindness - a $297,000 grant from Rotary International.
NEWS
By Charles R. Wolpoff and Charles R. Wolpoff,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 3, 1996
When a pharmaceutical company wants to train someone from Tanzania or an organic food processor wants to train an East German, an ocean of paperwork stands in the way.But the Association for International Practical Training in Columbia's Town Center is one of a handful of companies nationwide that specializes in sailing over that ocean. AIPT helps cut through the bureaucracy and works to ensure the training programs are legitimate -- and not just a way for a U.S. company to get cheap labor.
NEWS
By Davan Maharaj and Davan Maharaj,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2002
MERERANI, Tanzania - The young miners here are known as wanapollo, Swahili for spacemen. Several times a day, they emerge from half a mile below the earth, their bodies coated in glittering graphite dust. They are searching for tanzanite, a gem found only under a 5-square-mile patch of scrub near the base of Mount Kilimanjaro. A few months ago, Mohammed Abubakar supported his mother and eight siblings with money earned from mining the blue-violet stone. But since Sept. 11, reports that Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida network controlled a chunk of the tanzanite trade have sent the price of the gemstone down about 70 percent, slashing his earnings.
NEWS
October 17, 1990
Kenneth Kaunda has been Zambia's president since soon after he led it to independence in 1964. Julius Nyerere was chief minister of Tanganyika after the election of 1960, president since 1962 and president of Tanzania (incorporating Zanzibar) since 1964. They are founding fathers still ruling, the last of the giants who brought English-speaking Black Africa to independence. Though each has recognized his rule is obsolete, they have reacted in different ways.Both made their countries one-party states early on. They contended that British-style parliamentary democracy did not transplant to Africa, that tribalism cutting across national boundaries made it unworkable.
NEWS
April 30, 1992
A South Baltimore church near the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards wants baseball fans to see the light as well as the games.Saints Stephen and James' Evangelical Lutheran Church, Hanover and Hamburg streets, a few blocks from Oriole Park, is placing "baseball-inspired" messages on its outdoor signs before Orioles home games.A recent message: "Easter Doubleheader. Sermon: 'The Alleluia vs. The Eclipse.' Sinners Admitted Free."Future messages will tell fans that "God never makes errors" and that "No one should balk at God's gift of salvation."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Members of the Bonds Meadow Rotary club in Westminster are traveling to Tanzania today to help world health organizations battle river blindness, a debilitating disease that has affected hundreds of thousands of people and devastated farming communities in central Africa. Vince Campanella, chairman of Carroll's Economic Development Commission, and Paul Derstine, director of Interchurch Medical Assistance in New Windsor, will spend 10 days in remote villages of Tanzania. They will meet with Tanzanian officials and members of other Rotary clubs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
Dr. David Francis Clyde, a world-renowned malaria expert whose experiences and research in Tanzania led to a greater understanding of the disease, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 77. Born in Meruit, India, the son of a physician, he was sent to England at age 7 to study. He was evacuated from England at the start of World War II and sent to Kansas City, Kan., where he lived with relatives and graduated from high school in 1942. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas in 1946 and earned his medical degree from McGill University in 1949.
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