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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
A small service club in Westminster is helping to eradicate an illness that is devastating remote villages in the United Republic of Tanzania. Bonds Meadow Rotary Club, which has 70 members, has dedicated its resources to fighting river blindness in the East African country of 50 million for nearly three years, making the battle against what many call a debilitating scourge its signature project. In a meeting yesterday in Westminster, the group celebrated with Tanzanian officials - who are in Washington this week for an international conference on river blindness - a $297,000 grant from Rotary International.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For the Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
It's not often you hear of a traditional Irish band that features the name of an impoverished African nation in its title. But the Tanzania Ceili Band, which performs lively Irish music for social dancing, isn't your average group. The seven-member band was formed to raise money to build a medical clinic, Catholic school and orphanage in a remote region of Tanzania in East Africa. The musicians bolster the fundraising efforts of the Tanzanian Children's Project, a nonprofit formed five years ago by Knights of Columbus Columbia Council 7559.
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NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | March 3, 2006
The e-mail arrived with 50 others, but it grabbed my attention with its subject line: "1 friend $1." A neighbor, Susan Duff, was off to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. In researching the area, she found the Amani Children's Home, an orphanage (www.amanikids.org). Her e-mail requested that I send her one dollar, no more - and that I forward her e-mail to one friend. Meanwhile, Duff, who lives in Woodstock, had routed her e-mail to others going on the journey. One, Olivia Darden, lives in Dayton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Sarah Bart's run at the college championship on 'Jeopardy!' ended Tuesday with the senior  history major finishing second. But as runner-up, Bart left with $50,000 for her effort. Here's the release from the show: Sarah Bart, a 22-year-old history major at Goucher College, placed second in the “Jeopardy!” College Championship, taking home $50,000 in cash winnings.  Bart competed against 14 undergraduates from across the country during the competition.  This is the first time that the 1,446-student liberal arts and sciences college, located in Baltimore, Md., has been represented in the College Championship.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
NGARA, Tanzania -- Barely two days after a harrowing and exhausting escape from Rwanda, the more than a quarter-million refugees who arrived here were soaked by heavy rains, adding to the miseries of their makeshift lives with little shelter or food.Some had umbrellas to hide under, and a few strung out plastic tarpaulins or thatched together grass huts. But in this wide-open land, most just weathered the downpours with nothing.Barefoot children squatted on the roadside, shivering in oversized torn sweaters.
NEWS
December 12, 1996
AS ONE OF the British colonies gaining early independence, Tanganyika -- which later became Tanzania in recognition of its union with Zanzibar -- was a symbol. So was its first president, Julius Nyerere. He was an African socialist who appealed to many European social democrats, particularly in Scandinavia and Germany. They gave his impoverished country generous amounts of foreign aid. The problem was that little of anything worked in Tanzania.Take ujamaa, for example. From that Swahili word for cooperative economics sprang a misguided policy of collectivized agricultural developments along Soviet lines which failed miserably.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 2000
FOR JOHN MOORE, a dream vacation of an African safari has resulted in a new mission effort for Brooklyn Heights United Methodist Church. In February 1999, Moore, of Glen Burnie, went on a safari to Tanzania. One of his stops was the Esilalei Primary School, six miles from the village of Mto Wa Mbu on the Serengeti plains. The school has an official enrollment of 246 students in grades one through seven. "I never saw more than 100 students at the school," said Moore, a 67-year-old Westinghouse retiree.
NEWS
August 25, 1998
MOST OF THE harm in the exchange of explosives between terrorists and the United States was to neither of the above. It was, to use the euphemism of the military, collateral damage. Unintended victims. The innocent.This was notably true of the terrorist attacks on U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Although 12 U.S. citizens were murdered in the Nairobi attack, so were 247 Kenyans.More than 5,000 people were treated in Kenya's under-equipped hospitals and 542 hospitalized.
NEWS
October 18, 1999
JULIUS NYERERE was one of the founding fathers of post-colonial Africa. He had the patience of a teacher, which is what his Swahili honorific -- "Mwalimu" -- meant. The irony is that by the time he died Thursday at 77, his East African nation had largely discarded his teachings as irrelevant.Such a harsh verdict is not surprising. The political conditions that defined the world in 1961, when Mr. Nyerere led his country peacefully to independence from Britain, have disappeared. The struggle between communism and capitalism is over.
NEWS
February 21, 2005
Medical center empoyees buy livestock for Tanzania TOWSON -- Empoloyees of St. Joseph Medical Center have given $12,000 to buy chickens and goats for the poor of Tanzania, the medical center said in a statement. Tony LaPorta, laboratory manager, and Polly Ristaino, infection control manager, left recently to provide health care and bring medical supplies to Karatu, Tanzania, where St. Joseph has been participating in a Village Wellness Program since 2001. The program is supported by a three-year $324,000 grant from the Mission and Ministry Fund of Catholic Health Initiatives and a $25,000 grant from the Sisters of St. Francis in Philadelphia, the medical center said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. - Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Utopia today; flesh and blood tomorrow. -Victor Hugo in "Les Miserables" (1862) A lifetime ago, when she was a girl in North Linthicum, Addie Houston had a talk with her father, a successful engineer and inventor who traveled the world. "Some children aren't as lucky as you are," she remembers him saying. "They have to grow up without parents. It's just something you ought to know." The thought horrified Addie, then 5. She cried herself to sleep, but not before fixing a plan in her mind.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | March 2, 2008
ARUSHA, Tanzania -- One night when Neema Laizer was 14, her father announced that she had to go live with her new husband and his two wives the next day. Nobody asked the seventh-grader how she felt; it did not matter. But Neema, sensing her life was about to end, refused to submit. With help from her courageous mother and an uncle who was a priest, she fled her family's rural compound that night. Driven over bad roads to this city near Mount Kilimanjaro, she ended up at a center that places girls in schools and keeps them safe from forced marriage.
TRAVEL
By Maurice Possley and Maurice Possley,Chicago Tribune | December 9, 2007
ZANZIBAR, TANZANIA / / It's 6 a.m., the sun is about to catapult above the horizon, and trays with the makings for coffee and tea, along with tins of sweet cookies, appear quietly and almost magically on the verandas of the thatched-roof Matemwe Bungalows on the northeast coast of Zanzibar. A woman wades in the low tide water below, hunting for seaweed to sell. Fishing boats, some of them with sail -- called dhows -- and smaller ones called ngalawa, propelled by poles in the strong arms of fishermen, pass by, heading for the deeper waters beyond the reef.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | April 8, 2007
Dr. Leslie Mancuso, 50, is a world traveler, but most of her destinations are not exactly haute couture hotspots. "I just got back from Ghana, the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. I leave in a month for Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa," says Mancuso, the head of JHPIEGO (pronounced ja-pie-go), a Johns Hopkins affiliate and international health group that focuses on improving access to medical care for women and families in developing countries. "We're the jewel of Baltimore, and we've been here for nearly 35 years," says Mancuso, who joined JHPIEGO five years ago and lives in Fells Point with her husband.
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Under cover of the Ethiopian move into Somalia, U.S. officials launched an intensive effort to capture or kill three key suspects in the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa more than eight years ago that killed 224 people, including 12 American diplomats. An Air Force Special Operations gunship struck a place in southern Somalia where the suspects were believed to be hiding, a senior Pentagon official said yesterday. U.S. military and counterterrorism officials said they did not know whether any of the men had been killed.
NEWS
November 18, 2002
SCRATCH OFF ANOTHER utopian experiment. Tanzania is abandoning decades of failed socialist policies. The East African country is in the midst of privatizing 400 state-owned companies -- everything from agribusinesses to electric utilities to telecommunications to railroads. The move represents a startling rebuke to the legacy of Julius K. Nyerere, Tanzania's first president, who died three years ago. He wanted to build a socialist state. His goal was self-reliance, which was ironic because Tanzania remained an African weakling financed by foreign donors, chiefly in Scandinavia and West Germany.
NEWS
May 10, 1994
The rush of a quarter-million or more Rwandans across the Kagera River to sanctuary in Tanzania strains the ability of world refugee, health and food organizations to cope. Fortunately, a relief infrastructure of sorts exists there, because of previous migrations from neighboring Burundi. But it is the remotest part of Tanzania, with poor transportation and no facilities for the camps that need to be established until the people can go home.The last refugee wave from Rwanda, a generation ago, fled to Uganda.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 24, 2006
ZANZIBAR, Tanzania -- Islamist forces in Somalia expanded their offensive yesterday, witnesses said, and began attacking the seat of the transitional government from a new direction. According to residents in the Bakal area north of Baidoa, the inland city where the transitional government is based, Islamist forces rushed in with several dozen pickup trucks bristling with heavy guns. Before this, their attacks had been limited to the south and the east of Baidoa, where they met stiff resistance and suffered many casualties.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | March 3, 2006
The e-mail arrived with 50 others, but it grabbed my attention with its subject line: "1 friend $1." A neighbor, Susan Duff, was off to climb Mount Kilimanjaro. In researching the area, she found the Amani Children's Home, an orphanage (www.amanikids.org). Her e-mail requested that I send her one dollar, no more - and that I forward her e-mail to one friend. Meanwhile, Duff, who lives in Woodstock, had routed her e-mail to others going on the journey. One, Olivia Darden, lives in Dayton.
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