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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 17, 1993
SMITH ISLAND -- In July, three Virginia men visited Smith Island, a Maryland fishing village and popular tourist destination in the Chesapeake Bay. But they weren't there to buy T-shirts and souvenirs.They were on a mission to find out how Smith Island gets rid of its trash.What they learned might help Tangier Island -- 10 miles due south of Smith and across the state line in Virginia -- as officials there work out a long-term plan to dispose of Tangier's trash, which now is either burned in the town's inefficient incinerator or dumped alongside an isolated road.
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NEWS
August 20, 2013
Thank you for Carol Browner's commentary appreciating Gov. Martin O'Malley's climate change efforts ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). However, she didn't mention that Governor O'Malley could also reach out to Maryland's congressional delegation encouraging them to support congressional legislation to lower emissions and stabilize the climate. In particular, the he could encourage Rep. Andy Harris to meet with others in the delegation to fashion a bipartisan climate change bill.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 17, 1993
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- A brochure that promotes Tangier Island to tourists hints at something no one here is eager for visitors to see.It says: "Tangier is a romantic destination for those who would see a largely unspoiled fishing village. . . .""Largely unspoiled" are the words to note because a portion of this Chesapeake Bay island -- which Indians parted with in 1666 upon receipt of two overcoats -- couldn't be more spoiled. Accomack County Administrator Arthur K. Fisher describes it as "a festering sore."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
If you were choosing an official Maryland sandwich based on popularity, there'd be no contest. The crab cake would beat the soft-shell crab sandwich every time. So, if the General Assembly enacts a bill this session that makes the soft-shell crab sandwich (rather than, say, the crab cake) the state sandwich of Maryland, it would be the biggest state symbol upset since the Wye Oak toppled in 2002. Some Marylanders are supporting the undercrab. "I love them. It is kind of iconic for the region," said John Shields, whose restaurant, Gertrude's, is a citadel of Chesapeake cooking.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- Just as she has done nearly every December for as long as she can remember, 24-year-old Melissa Parks watched yesterday as a squadron of two dozen small planes brought Christmas to her isolated community.Following a more than three-decades-old tradition for the close-knit village of watermen and their families, Parks clutched the hand of her 4-year-old son, Scott, who jumped excitedly as Santa Claus emerged from a twin-engine Piper Seneca.As each private plane landed at the sparse airfield at the Chesapeake Bay's edge, pilots unloaded their cargo -- bags crammed with boughs of holly that residents of this flat, nearly treeless island of marsh and sand will use to decorate their churches and homes.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
TYLERTON - "JUST 58 of us now." It was the talk of those sitting around the store last week in this Smith Island village. An elderly lady, resident for more than 90 years, had departed for a mainland nursing home, or "gone off" as they say on the island. Across Maryland and most of the world, it is growing numbers of people we worry about, but here on Smith, one of the Chesapeake's only two inhabited offshore islands, it's a grim countdown in the opposite direction. Look at the numbers for Tylerton, one of three towns on this marshy bastion of bay watermen eight miles off Crisfield.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 2, 2000
As we pull out of the harbor at Crisfield, Tangier Sound is pleated with waves. Gulls hoping for a handout sail alongside, suspended on air currents like objects in a child's mobile. I've hitched an early-morning ride on the mail boat to Tangier Island, Va., a place of legendary skipjack captains, watermen and age-old traditions. I've longed to visit this place since first sailing past it years ago. Although it's called an island, Tangier is more like a dense little archipelago -- chunks of sand and salt marsh split by tidal canals called "guts" that are linked by small, arched bridges.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
ON BOARD THE CHOCK -- Breaking ice is a dogged and fleeting business.Yesterday, the Chock -- a 65-foot Coast Guard cutter out of Norfolk -- pulled away from the dock at Crisfield and pointed her reinforced steel nose with its underwater "hammer" toward Tangier Island, setting off on a route she had already plowed twice in the previous 18 hours.Much of the way, it might as well have been the first time.Wind, tide and the hard freeze overnight had ensured there would be no neat channel of open water to follow.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | January 21, 1994
TANGIER, Va. -- For the 700 or so residents of this icebound island in the lower Chesapeake Bay, yesterday was when their boat finally came in.Loaded with milk, bread, diapers, cat food, mail and other essentials, the 90-foot cruise vessel Steven Thomas inched into the harbor for the first time since freezing temperatures turned much of Tangier Sound into a vast ice pack.Cut off since the weekend, Tangier and Smith Island, its Maryland neighbor to the north, were reconnected temporarily to the mainland thanks to steel-hulled ice breakers.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
Thank you for Carol Browner's commentary appreciating Gov. Martin O'Malley's climate change efforts ("The importance of Maryland's leadership on climate change," Aug. 18). However, she didn't mention that Governor O'Malley could also reach out to Maryland's congressional delegation encouraging them to support congressional legislation to lower emissions and stabilize the climate. In particular, the he could encourage Rep. Andy Harris to meet with others in the delegation to fashion a bipartisan climate change bill.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 24, 2012
"If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy," wrote essayist E.B. White; "and if it were merely challenging that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. "This makes it hard to plan the day. " We know what White meant. But sometimes nature allows no waffling; like the weekend when she suffused the Chesapeake Bay with such glory there was nothing for it but to stop saving the world and simply revel in it. We launched on a golden, placid morning from Bishops Head, a peninsula dangling from the marshy underbelly of Dorchester County.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2011
Lanny Ross struggled to push his 78-year-old mother through the surf toward shore. On a cool, cloudy October afternoon, his two-seater plane had smacked into the Chesapeake Bay, stranding them both amid five-foot waves. His mother's right eye was swollen shut, her teeth had pierced her bottom lip, and her nose was broken. Miles from land, the sun was setting and they were shivering, when his mother spoke. Hold my hand, she told him. What's wrong? he asked her. Hold my hand, she said again.
NEWS
By CHRIS GUY and CHRIS GUY,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- Christmas came to this isolated watermen's town yesterday in a six-passenger Piper Saratoga, along with a squadron of 20 other small planes that renewed a holiday tradition that has marked the season here for nearly 40 years. As each plane landed on the island's airstrip at the edge of the Chesapeake Bay, pilots and passengers unloaded a cache of holly and pine boughs that will decorate homes and churches on the island where the prickly bushes don't grow and trees of any kind seldom break the flat horizon.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
TANGIER, Va. - Christmas on Tangier Island this year means silk poinsettia swags hauled over on the mail boat, fake firs and faux mistletoe - and holly berries made of plastic or wax. For the first time in more than three decades, the tiny Virginia fishing village will not be decked with boughs of lustrous fresh holly. "There's been such a dwindling away," 77-year-old Virginia Marshall says from her rocking chair. She's talking about the end of the famous Holly Run, a tradition that she and a passel of small-plane pilots from the mainland have organized for the past 36 Decembers, which brought loads of holly to the barren island.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2004
TYLERTON - "JUST 58 of us now." It was the talk of those sitting around the store last week in this Smith Island village. An elderly lady, resident for more than 90 years, had departed for a mainland nursing home, or "gone off" as they say on the island. Across Maryland and most of the world, it is growing numbers of people we worry about, but here on Smith, one of the Chesapeake's only two inhabited offshore islands, it's a grim countdown in the opposite direction. Look at the numbers for Tylerton, one of three towns on this marshy bastion of bay watermen eight miles off Crisfield.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- Tropical Storm Isabel ripped through the harbor of this Chesapeake Bay outpost last fall, destroying a rough-hewn collection of crab shanties and threatening the precarious hold that islanders have on their way of life. The hard-crab season is off to a sluggish start in still-chilly waters. Rebuilding the shacks will be crucial for harvesting soft-shell crabs when they begin molting in the next few weeks, and federal officials are trying to come up with a plan to help pay for the repairs.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
TANGIER, Va. - Christmas on Tangier Island this year means silk poinsettia swags hauled over on the mail boat, fake firs and faux mistletoe - and holly berries made of plastic or wax. For the first time in more than three decades, the tiny Virginia fishing village will not be decked with boughs of lustrous fresh holly. "There's been such a dwindling away," 77-year-old Virginia Marshall says from her rocking chair. She's talking about the end of the famous Holly Run, a tradition that she and a passel of small-plane pilots from the mainland have organized for the past 36 Decembers, which brought loads of holly to the barren island.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 24, 2012
"If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy," wrote essayist E.B. White; "and if it were merely challenging that would be no problem. But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world. "This makes it hard to plan the day. " We know what White meant. But sometimes nature allows no waffling; like the weekend when she suffused the Chesapeake Bay with such glory there was nothing for it but to stop saving the world and simply revel in it. We launched on a golden, placid morning from Bishops Head, a peninsula dangling from the marshy underbelly of Dorchester County.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2001
Maryland winters can be particularly ferocious or quite benign. The winter of 1779, which earned the sobriquet of "The Hard Winter," left icebound ships in the Chesapeake Bay loaded with desperately needed supplies for George Washington's Continental Army, shivering in winter quarters at Morristown, N.J. The coldest winter in the past 100 years was the winter of 1917-1918, which roared into Maryland, dropping three times the normal amount of snow and...
NEWS
By Bob Dart and Bob Dart,COX NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2000
TANGIER ISLAND, Va. -- On pleasant evenings, teen-age islanders congregate on the steps of the weathered post office and converse in a lilting parlance that traces to their Elizabethan forebears. Ofttimes the talk is of leaving. "There's more to do" on the mainland, explains Sandy Dise, 15, a 10th-grader whose roots run generations deep in the scant island soil. "And you don't have to take a boat when you want to do it." "We're losing the young people," laments Mayor Dewey Crockett, who is also assistant principal of the school, music director and organist at Swain Memorial United Methodist Church, and the undertaker.
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