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Tangerine

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NEWS
By Pat O'Malley | September 22, 1991
Jack Crandell and Tom Conley, the two coaches largely responsible for the softball boom in Anne Arundel County over the last decade, are getting out of the business.After 18 years, their Tangerine Machine 18-and-under softball team has dissolved."Jack and I just got tired of the whole thing, and, yes, financeswere part of the reason," said Conley, who, with Crandell, began theorganization as the St. Rose of Lima Catholic Youth Organization in Brooklyn 18 years ago. It eventually became known as the Tangerine Machine when CYOs ceased to exist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 21, 2011
You guys are not even ready for this episode. I mean, did you eat today? Then you can't handle it, come back tomorrow. [/internet time swoosh] Okay, let's just dive in. First up: the teams are still in Copenhagen. They taxi to a statue of Hans Christian Andersen. Hans has a plaque on his statue with a short poem on it, and a Roadblocking team member must memorize the poem, bike to a theater and perform the poem for a drama critic. If they mess up, or if they don't infuse it with enough drama, they must bike back to the statue and try again.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
Karen Hay struck out seven, allowed just five hits, walked one, hit another batter and threw three wild pitches in seven innings' work in the opener of the Amateur Softball Association Junior Olympic Fastpitch tournament.Her counterpart, Jen Holsinger, walked seven, struck out five and yielded three wild pitches in seven innings last night at Columbia's Cedar Lane Park.Guess who got the win?Hay's Tangerine Machine, one of three Anne Arundel-based teams competing in the 18-and-under tournament, made mistakes at the worst possible moments, allowing Holsinger's Columbus (Ohio)
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
For some of us, it is not Christmas morning without a tangerine in our stocking. The trouble is that nowadays choosing seasonal citrus, like many parts of the holiday, has become more complicated. In addition to the traditional tangerine, with its seeds and pulp, there are orange orbs called clementines, grown both overseas and in the U.S.A., plus a variety of tangerine, the Satsuma, that does not have seeds. What is a kid, or a fogey like me, supposed to peel and enjoy on the big day?
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS | January 25, 2006
What is the difference between tangerines, tangelos and clementines? The orange-colored, spheroid members of the citrus genus are a tangle of botanical and taxonomic confusion, which I will do my best to sort out. Because citrus trees are so easy to cross, the genus includes scores of hybrids. However, there is some recent genetic evidence to suggest that in the botanical beginning, there were only three species of citrus and that the panoply of today's citrus fruits is all descended from them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | March 16, 2003
It was a colorful weekend, at least party-wise, a week ago. The theme at the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's "Spring Swing" was "Tangerine Dream." That meant orange everywhere in the Marriott Waterfront's ballroom. CFF's Maren Blum says when the 500 guests walked into the room, they got a "great citrus smell" from the cajillions (a technical party term) of tangerines that were hanging from the ceiling. Table centerpieces consisted of tangerines and candles floating in water-filled bowls. Since the title also incorporated a certain '60's feel, there were go-go dancers, clad in orange minis and white boots.
FEATURES
By Patricia McLaughlin and Patricia McLaughlin,Universal Press Syndicate | November 22, 1990
The fashion magazines have been full of praise for bright color this fall -- and full of snide remarks about black. They still love avocado green, burnt orange and harvest gold, the nauseating trio of 1960s earth tones that made a big comeback last year. And now they love hot colors like tangerine, shocking pink, chrome yellow and ultraviolet even more.Meanwhile, black, so long fashion's darling, finds itself disparaged at every turn."God, I am so bored with black," Anne Klein's Louis Dell'Olio says.
SPORTS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 24, 2002
ORLANDO, Fla. -- All Kliff Kingsbury ever wanted to do was go out a winner. And did he ever. The Texas Tech senior capped his prolific career yesterday by leading the Red Raiders to a stunning 55-15 victory over Clemson in the Tangerine Bowl. He then signed autographs for fans -- and teammates, too -- and capped the night by directing the Tech band through "March Grandioso" in the south end zone of Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium. "This has been a dream come true," said Kingsbury, who completed 74.4 percent of his passes for 375 yards and three touchdowns.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
For some of us, it is not Christmas morning without a tangerine in our stocking. The trouble is that nowadays choosing seasonal citrus, like many parts of the holiday, has become more complicated. In addition to the traditional tangerine, with its seeds and pulp, there are orange orbs called clementines, grown both overseas and in the U.S.A., plus a variety of tangerine, the Satsuma, that does not have seeds. What is a kid, or a fogey like me, supposed to peel and enjoy on the big day?
NEWS
By Marlene Parrish and Marlene Parrish,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 14, 2004
Has this ever happened to you? As an inveterate reader of cookbooks in bed, you discover a tempting recipe and fantasize about how it might look, smell and taste. Then you turn the page, primed for the next sensory fantasy. Once in a great while, though, you decide you can and, by golly, will pull off that recipe. For starters, there's that Tangerine Bundt Cake that looks so fabulous and stately on the plate. Shortly after dawn, you assemble the ingredients and begin to measure flour and sugar with enthusiasm.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 11, 2008
Actors wearing suits the shade of egg yolks cruise down a stage on scooters. Balloons bob on the breeze. There's a line of Keystone Cops, and performers silently mime bits of slapstick during scene changes. Director Ian Gallaner has festooned his Chesapeake Shakespeare Company production of The Comedy of Errors with trappings designed to make the show feel buoyant and swift, but unfortunately, the actors can't pull off the kind of high style he has in mind. I couldn't help wishing that Gallaner had devoted less time and effort on what essentially are garnishes, and focused instead on developing even a single compelling performance on the stage at the Patapsco Female Institute's historic ruins.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,[Sun reporter] | December 6, 2006
Sugar and spice may or may not be what little girls are made of, but they definitely take center stage when it comes to holiday cookies. More than 100 bakers answered our call to send their best sweet or spicy recipes for our annual holiday cookie exchange. We floured, buttered, sliced and tasted our way to nine favorites -- four sugar, four spice and one "everything nice" that had the best of both. The winning sugar entries were rolled in sparkling, coarse sugar; flavored with subtle citrus or a surprising herb; studded with colorful fruit; or topped with a light coating of superfine sugar.
NEWS
By TED KOOSER and TED KOOSER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 2006
Poet Ruth L. Schwartz writes of the glimpse of possibility, of something sweeter than we already have that comes to us, grows in us. The unrealizable part of it causes bitterness; the other opens outward, the cycle complete. This is both a poem about a tangerine and about more than that. "Tangerine" It was a flower once, it was one of a billion flowers whose perfume broke through closed car windows, forced a blessing on their drivers. Then what stayed behind grew swollen, as we do; grew juice instead of tears, and small hard sour seeds, each one bitter, as we are, and filled with possibility.
NEWS
By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 29, 2006
Despite our down-to-earth appearance, gardeners are as keen on the latest styles as fashion-crazed socialites are. But we don't wear them. We plant them. And this year, fellow garden fashionistas, the word is color. Come spring our garden centers will be filled with high-wattage offerings like 'Fruit Punch' oriental poppy (Papaver orientale), 'Zowie!' Zinnia (Zinnia elegans), Mango Tango Impatiens, and 'Pin Up Flame' Begonia. "This year's trend is bright, tropical color that stands out when you're driving by," says Tracy Lee, seed purchasing manager at W. Atlee Burpee in Warminster, Pa. The reason is impact.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS | January 25, 2006
What is the difference between tangerines, tangelos and clementines? The orange-colored, spheroid members of the citrus genus are a tangle of botanical and taxonomic confusion, which I will do my best to sort out. Because citrus trees are so easy to cross, the genus includes scores of hybrids. However, there is some recent genetic evidence to suggest that in the botanical beginning, there were only three species of citrus and that the panoply of today's citrus fruits is all descended from them.
NEWS
By Ronnie Fein and Ronnie Fein,SPECIAL TO THE ADVOCATE | October 13, 2004
As summer goes by there's a pageant of plums in the markets. Green plums, black ones, red ones - sweet, succulent fruit giving forth nectar for warm-weather refreshment. Bringing up the rear are Italian prune plums, the last of the lot, a harbinger of autumn. They're peewees compared to crimson-colored Rosas or dark-skinned Friars. And with their soft, matte finish, these small bluish-purplish types are a bit dull. Prune plums are only so-so for eating out of hand, too, not quite sweet and no gush of juice.
FEATURES
By Better Homes and Gardens | March 30, 1994
Your friends will go nuts when you serve this luscious toasted pecan cake, reminiscent of Austrian bakery cakes. It's layered with a velvety caramel-tangerine filling and topped with billowy clouds of whipped cream. The nuts double as flour, giving the cake a coarse texture and nutty taste.Pecan cake with tangerine cream fillingMakes 12 servings.2 1/2 cups broken pecans, toasted3 tablespoons all-purpose flour4 teaspoons baking powder6 eggs1 cup granulated sugar8-ounce package cream cheese, softened1/4 cup margarine or butter1/2 cup packed brown sugar1 teaspoon finely shredded tangerine or orange peel1 teaspoon vanilla 1 recipe Whipped Cream FrostingGrease and flour two 8-by-1 1/2 -inch round baking pans; set aside.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | August 7, 1991
California has the defending champion in the Gordon Panthers from La Palma and seven other entries in 70-team field in the Amateur Softball Association girls 18-and-under national fast-pitch double-elimination softball tournament that begins tonight in Columbia.But Maryland has high hopes and four teams in the running fothe championship.Three of those teams -- Tangerine Machine, Wagner's and JadGarden -- are from Anne Arundel county and the other -- Lewistown Tigers -- is from the Frederick County town of Lewistown.
NEWS
By Marlene Parrish and Marlene Parrish,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 14, 2004
Has this ever happened to you? As an inveterate reader of cookbooks in bed, you discover a tempting recipe and fantasize about how it might look, smell and taste. Then you turn the page, primed for the next sensory fantasy. Once in a great while, though, you decide you can and, by golly, will pull off that recipe. For starters, there's that Tangerine Bundt Cake that looks so fabulous and stately on the plate. Shortly after dawn, you assemble the ingredients and begin to measure flour and sugar with enthusiasm.
NEWS
By Tara Weiss and Tara Weiss,Hartford Courant | January 18, 2004
There was the Pashmina. There was the Mini Cooper. And now there's the pomegranate. Yes, the pomegranate is what's hot this winter. Charlotte spritzed herself with a pomegranate-scented spray on Sex and the City recently. It's the star of such mixed drinks as the pomtini and ruby mojito. Origins, a natural-skin-product store, now has a line of pomegranate bath and body products and a scented candle. Its juices are turning up in vinaigrettes, and its seeds are sprinkled over salads. "I ... worked the Sex and the City party at New Year's Eve," says Dale DeGroff, author of The Craft of the Cocktail.
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