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By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 15, 1994
It's common knowledge that chicken is lean as long as you discard the skin. When you wish to roast a chicken, you're faced with a dilemma. During roasting, the chicken's skin acts as a protective layer so the meat will not dry out in the oven. But when we virtuously cut the skin off the roast chicken, we also remove the seasonings, and we're left with no flavorings to enhance the meat.A perfect solution to this predicament is found in the cuisine of India. The traditional way to cook chicken in that country is without its skin.
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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2005
Like many new restaurants, Kathmandu Kitchen has not yet become what its owners hope it will be. For now, the Towson eating place focuses mainly on Indian food, though it also serves pizzas, salads and -- the food that could eventually set Kathmandu apart -- a smattering of Nepali dishes. In the near future, owners Kiran Pantha and Sundar Rajehandari intend to jettison the pizza (you can get fine slices elsewhere in Towson), keep the Indian food and offer more dishes from their native Nepal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1998
We opened dinner menus at Tiffin to read that the name of this Indian restaurant actually translates as lunch. Sure enough, a long serving table with empty chafing dishes stood against one wall, ready for the next day's elaborate lunch buffet.If you're going to travel a distance to eat at Tiffin in Langley Park, go for the lunch buffet, a terrific deal that includes soup, appetizers, dessert and a half-dozen freshly made meat and vegetarian dishes, all for $5.95 during the week and $7.95 on weekends.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
What a list of big names! Saturday saw four of them on the Meyerhoff stage for the Reginald F. Lewis Museum's second annual gala. Vocal divas Regina Belle, Jennifer Holliday, Stephanie Mills and Melba Moore performed for a sold-out celebratory audience. But they weren't the only big names in the house that night. At a pre-concert dinner reception, there was plenty of local VIP watching to be had. Mingling in the crowd: George Gilliam, Karen Queen, Paul Wolman, Dr. Ben and Candy Carson, Beverly Cooper, Dr. Levi Watkins, Rhonda Overby and Joe Haskins, Jenine and Patrick Turner, Page Davis, Neil Muldrew, Ruth Louie, Bill and Cherie Roberts, Stu Simms, Darius and Dessolene Davis, Hal Hathaway, Trish Fallon, Gary Murray, Dr. Freeman and Jackie Hrabowski.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine | February 3, 1999
If you've been to a spa recently, you already know this: The food is good. And if you haven't, we've got a surprise for you. The days of bland, meager fare served in the name of weight loss are over.Modern spa meals are creative, substantial, even luxurious, yet most of them feature entrees that are a diet-friendly 300 calories or less. Eating like this is such an easy way to drop pounds, it seems unfair that it's a treat reserved for those lucky enough to visit an expensive health resort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
Mount Everest is in a strip shopping center in Parkville. Its exterior sign promises pizza and pasta, as well as Indian and Nepali. Once inside, we learn that the pizza and pasta are only on the take-out side. The spacious and serene dining room serves food from India and Nepal (home to part of the restaurant's namesake mountain). Owners and brothers Chandra and Lok Chhantyal have another Mount Everest restaurant on Frankford Avenue. It's 4 years old and serves mostly Indian food. The new restaurant, which opened in November, also serves mostly Indian food, but the brothers plan to serve more dishes from their native Nepal, says Lok Chhantyal, who is also the chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2005
Like many new restaurants, Kathmandu Kitchen has not yet become what its owners hope it will be. For now, the Towson eating place focuses mainly on Indian food, though it also serves pizzas, salads and -- the food that could eventually set Kathmandu apart -- a smattering of Nepali dishes. In the near future, owners Kiran Pantha and Sundar Rajehandari intend to jettison the pizza (you can get fine slices elsewhere in Towson), keep the Indian food and offer more dishes from their native Nepal.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
Given the number of different regions in India and the complexity of their cuisines, it's surprising how alike the menus of Baltimore's Indian restaurants are. You would think there are only about 10 Indian dishes in the whole world: vegetable samosas, lamb saag, tandoori chicken -- you get the idea. OK, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but you know what I mean. And for some reason, they all have lunch buffets, which I don't think of as particularly Indian, but that's another story. Baltimore's highest profile Indian restaurant, the Ambassador, surprised people when it opened in 1997 because it was different.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2003
I have to admit, Bombay Garden did not make a great first impression. The balloons and streamers near the ceiling did not seem to go with the Indian artwork on the walls and the soft Indian music we heard. And the empty chafing dishes from the lunchtime buffet were still out. But we warmed to the place once we started eating. And we even grew to like the atmosphere, which was casual enough for families, yet romantic enough for a date. The 4-month-old Indian restaurant is owned by Balwinder Singh Chana, who owned and operated Mughal Garden on North Charles Street until recently and was chef at the renowned Akbar before that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
What a list of big names! Saturday saw four of them on the Meyerhoff stage for the Reginald F. Lewis Museum's second annual gala. Vocal divas Regina Belle, Jennifer Holliday, Stephanie Mills and Melba Moore performed for a sold-out celebratory audience. But they weren't the only big names in the house that night. At a pre-concert dinner reception, there was plenty of local VIP watching to be had. Mingling in the crowd: George Gilliam, Karen Queen, Paul Wolman, Dr. Ben and Candy Carson, Beverly Cooper, Dr. Levi Watkins, Rhonda Overby and Joe Haskins, Jenine and Patrick Turner, Page Davis, Neil Muldrew, Ruth Louie, Bill and Cherie Roberts, Stu Simms, Darius and Dessolene Davis, Hal Hathaway, Trish Fallon, Gary Murray, Dr. Freeman and Jackie Hrabowski.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
Given the number of different regions in India and the complexity of their cuisines, it's surprising how alike the menus of Baltimore's Indian restaurants are. You would think there are only about 10 Indian dishes in the whole world: vegetable samosas, lamb saag, tandoori chicken -- you get the idea. OK, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but you know what I mean. And for some reason, they all have lunch buffets, which I don't think of as particularly Indian, but that's another story. Baltimore's highest profile Indian restaurant, the Ambassador, surprised people when it opened in 1997 because it was different.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2003
Mount Everest is in a strip shopping center in Parkville. Its exterior sign promises pizza and pasta, as well as Indian and Nepali. Once inside, we learn that the pizza and pasta are only on the take-out side. The spacious and serene dining room serves food from India and Nepal (home to part of the restaurant's namesake mountain). Owners and brothers Chandra and Lok Chhantyal have another Mount Everest restaurant on Frankford Avenue. It's 4 years old and serves mostly Indian food. The new restaurant, which opened in November, also serves mostly Indian food, but the brothers plan to serve more dishes from their native Nepal, says Lok Chhantyal, who is also the chef.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2003
I have to admit, Bombay Garden did not make a great first impression. The balloons and streamers near the ceiling did not seem to go with the Indian artwork on the walls and the soft Indian music we heard. And the empty chafing dishes from the lunchtime buffet were still out. But we warmed to the place once we started eating. And we even grew to like the atmosphere, which was casual enough for families, yet romantic enough for a date. The 4-month-old Indian restaurant is owned by Balwinder Singh Chana, who owned and operated Mughal Garden on North Charles Street until recently and was chef at the renowned Akbar before that.
FEATURES
By Eating Well Magazine | February 3, 1999
If you've been to a spa recently, you already know this: The food is good. And if you haven't, we've got a surprise for you. The days of bland, meager fare served in the name of weight loss are over.Modern spa meals are creative, substantial, even luxurious, yet most of them feature entrees that are a diet-friendly 300 calories or less. Eating like this is such an easy way to drop pounds, it seems unfair that it's a treat reserved for those lucky enough to visit an expensive health resort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1998
We opened dinner menus at Tiffin to read that the name of this Indian restaurant actually translates as lunch. Sure enough, a long serving table with empty chafing dishes stood against one wall, ready for the next day's elaborate lunch buffet.If you're going to travel a distance to eat at Tiffin in Langley Park, go for the lunch buffet, a terrific deal that includes soup, appetizers, dessert and a half-dozen freshly made meat and vegetarian dishes, all for $5.95 during the week and $7.95 on weekends.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 15, 1994
It's common knowledge that chicken is lean as long as you discard the skin. When you wish to roast a chicken, you're faced with a dilemma. During roasting, the chicken's skin acts as a protective layer so the meat will not dry out in the oven. But when we virtuously cut the skin off the roast chicken, we also remove the seasonings, and we're left with no flavorings to enhance the meat.A perfect solution to this predicament is found in the cuisine of India. The traditional way to cook chicken in that country is without its skin.
FEATURES
By KATE SHATZKIN | July 1, 2006
What it is -- A one-serving package of rice that can be microwaved or stir-fried. What we like about it --For a packaged convenience item, this rice is surprisingly rich in aroma and flavor; we detected plenty of evidence of its signature spices. It made a fine partner for tandoori chicken and couldn't have been easier to prepare. Other flavors in the line include basmati, coconut and yellow rice. What it costs --$5.99 for two 8.82-ounce pouches Where to buy it --worldfood.com Per serving (1 package)
NEWS
October 25, 2007
Alabama BBQ Company 4311 Harford Road -- Lauraville -- 410-254-1440 Mirchi Wok 6365A Dobbin Road -- Columbia -- 410-730-4689 Entrees $9.95-$18.95 Mango Grove, Columbia's popular vegetarian Indian restaurant, now has an omnivore cousin in Mirchi Wok, which serves hearty, masterfully spiced chicken, seafood and lamb dishes, as well as meat-free entrees. The restaurants share ownership and a front door, but each has its own kitchen and menu. Though the typical Indian kormas and kebabs are served at Mirchi Wok, so are creations like the rarra laal maas, a rich stew that marries the earthy flavors of both ground lamb and chunks of lamb with a heady mix of spices.
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