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NEWS
July 31, 2004
Susan T. Buffett, 72, the wife of billionaire investor Warren E. Buffett, died Thursday of a stroke at a hospital in Cody, Wyo., where she and her husband were visiting. Mrs. Buffett, a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. director, was listed this year by Forbes magazine as the 60th richest American, with a personal net worth of $3.1 billion. Though the Buffetts had lived separately for many years, she stood to inherit her husband's fortune. Mr. Buffett, second only to Bill Gates on the Forbes world wealth list, had said his Berkshire stock, valued at about $42.9 billion, would go to his wife upon his death and then to a foundation.
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NEWS
July 31, 2004
Susan T. Buffett, 72, the wife of billionaire investor Warren E. Buffett, died Thursday of a stroke at a hospital in Cody, Wyo., where she and her husband were visiting. Mrs. Buffett, a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. director, was listed this year by Forbes magazine as the 60th richest American, with a personal net worth of $3.1 billion. Though the Buffetts had lived separately for many years, she stood to inherit her husband's fortune. Mr. Buffett, second only to Bill Gates on the Forbes world wealth list, had said his Berkshire stock, valued at about $42.9 billion, would go to his wife upon his death and then to a foundation.
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NEWS
June 29, 1995
If a picture is worth a thousand words, surely a clever political cartoon is worth at least that many high-minded editorials.Ever since the first great American political satirist, Thomas Nast, helped topple "Boss" Tweed and his Tammany Hall machine with pungent caricatures in the 1880s, editorial cartoonists have taken a wicked delight in skewering the high and mighty.That long tradition will be recalled today when the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists opens its annual convention here, bringing together cartoonists to swap ideas, size up the competition and celebrate the ungentle arts of lambasting, roasting, ridiculing and reviling -- the political satirist's stock in trade.
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | August 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Remember the sleaze factor? That was what we called the way of doing business that so many of the Reagan and Bush people seemed to think was proper, back in Decade of Greed I.High Reaganites and Bushies who had not yet gone into government service, or had just left it, peddled access to their friends who were on the inside, and who would, in their own sweet turn, leave the White House grounds to set up their own peddling shops. The Republicans were so blatant at this delicate practice we thought we'd never see their like again.
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | August 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Remember the sleaze factor? That was what we called the way of doing business that so many of the Reagan and Bush people seemed to think was proper, back in Decade of Greed I.High Reaganites and Bushies who had not yet gone into government service, or had just left it, peddled access to their friends who were on the inside, and who would, in their own sweet turn, leave the White House grounds to set up their own peddling shops. The Republicans were so blatant at this delicate practice we thought we'd never see their like again.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
Perhaps it's a stretch, but Sun cartoonist KAL is like a modern-day Thomas Nast, whose political cartoons helped bring down the most corrupt mayoral rein in New York City's history, Tammany Hall under "Boss Tweed" in the 1850s. Mr. Nast capitalized on the high illiteracy rate of the populace of his day but clearly understood the "picture paints a thousand words" theory, and you didn't have to be able to read to get his point. Fast forward to 2014, and while the illiteracy rate is certainly not what it was in Mr. Nast's day, that's merely been replaced by an abysmal dearth of information.
NEWS
By Stan M. Haynes | June 25, 2012
This summer, the Republican and Democratic parties will hold their presidential nominating conventions in Tampa, Fla., and Charlotte, N.C. In so doing, they will continue a political ritual that began 180 years ago in Baltimore. From their inception in the campaign of 1832 and continuing through the Civil War, Baltimore was the city of choice for conventions, hosting a dozen, compared to only two each for its closest competitors. The last 19th-century convention to be held in Baltimore was in 1872.
NEWS
September 27, 2000
YOU HAVE TO admire the in-your-face nerve of it all. State Sen. Thomas Bromwell's breathtaking grab for the gold stands amid the most audacious high-level patronage of recent times. The one-time bar owner now enters the Pantheon of political self-dealers. He'll be riding around in a car financed by a $30,000 allowance that comes with his new salary of $150,000. To make the situation even more breathtaking, he'll be managing a $1 billion insurance business -- a job for which he has almost no qualification or experience.
NEWS
May 8, 1996
WHAT MUST be infuriating to the latest targets of Alfonse D'Amato, otherwise known as "Senator Potshot," is that he is politically on target. Of fellow Republicans like Pat Buchanan, who are staunchly anti-abortion, Mr. D'Amato asks why such "philosophical ayatollahs" think they can dictate to the GOP. Of House conservatives, particularly Speaker Newt Gingrich, he said their "harsh rhetoric" created an impression Republicans are a "party without compassion."If...
NEWS
By Daniel Bell | November 23, 1993
THE news that Republicans may have used "street money" or "walking-around money" to suppress the Democratic vote in New Jersey's election for governor reminded me of ingenious tactics used by Tammany Hall in my youth more than 60 years ago.Paper ballots were used. The first voter in line received a ballot, walked into the booth, dropped an empty piece of paper in the box and walked out with an unmarked ballot.He gave it to the precinct captain, who handed him $2 or $3 for the ballot.The next man in line was given the first man's ballot, now marked for the Democratic candidate.
NEWS
June 29, 1995
If a picture is worth a thousand words, surely a clever political cartoon is worth at least that many high-minded editorials.Ever since the first great American political satirist, Thomas Nast, helped topple "Boss" Tweed and his Tammany Hall machine with pungent caricatures in the 1880s, editorial cartoonists have taken a wicked delight in skewering the high and mighty.That long tradition will be recalled today when the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists opens its annual convention here, bringing together cartoonists to swap ideas, size up the competition and celebrate the ungentle arts of lambasting, roasting, ridiculing and reviling -- the political satirist's stock in trade.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
Thank you for your editorial on the questionable relationship between Caves Valley Partners and Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz ( "Kamenetz the kingmaker," May 22). Your editorial brought to light several important issues surrounding loopholes in campaign finance law in local politics. While the Boss Tweed/Tammany Hall atmosphere is disturbing, the core problem is not one of increased financial involvement of developers in Baltimore County political races, but in the overall arrogance of the Kamenetz administration toward the people of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Neil Noble For and Neil Noble For,The Howard County Sun | April 26, 1992
There are three problems that concern me pertaining to Columbia.One is that the covenants are not being enforced adequately.The second is that the people, in general, don't seem to care about our covenants.The third is that the Rouse Co. appears to be playing its own version of the Tammany Hall game.The covenants thatmost of us bought into are well intentioned and well thought out. I believe we would be well advised to pay them greater heed. When one buys a residence within the Columbia Association jurisdiction, one buys both the property and the covenants.
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