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By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 9, 2005
KILINOCHCHI, Sri Lanka - In her 12 years as a medic for a rebel Tamil army, Meera saw the worst that war has to offer. Her hands and face, heavily scarred from burns and skin grafts, are testimony to that. But now she has seen what nature can do in minutes. "I have not seen worse than this," said Meera, who like many Tamils goes by only one name. "It's much more lost than on the battlefield." The president of Sri Lanka, Chandrika Kumaratunga, says that on Dec. 26, nature "mocked" the country's nearly two-decade civil war by killing tens of thousands of people and destroying whole communities in less than an hour.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | January 4, 2008
Before consummating the arms deal, buyers for a South Asian rebel group needed an expert. So they turned to Thirunavukarasu Varatharasa, a citizen of Sri Lanka and a member of the Tamil Tigers, which is designated as a terrorist organization by the U.S. government. Prosecutors say he knew how to inspect the fully automatic weapons and surface-to-air missiles to determine whether they had flaws. Varatharasa was arrested in Guam after inspecting the military hardware during a clandestine meeting with undercover American agents from Maryland.
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NEWS
By Vanessa Gezari and Vanessa Gezari,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2002
KILINOCHCHI, Sri Lanka - The guerrilla leader emerges from the jungle dressed in a powder blue suit. Bodyguards in dark, gold-rimmed sunglasses surround him, weapons bulging from their hips. No one has seen him in years - no one but his disciplined and brutal cadres. It has been so long that some Sri Lankans have begun to wonder whether he is alive. At twilight, Velupillai Prabhakaran, leader of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, sits beneath a white tent in this bomb-shattered town 150 miles north of the capital, Colombo, and utters words that many hope will change the lives of Sri Lanka's 18 million people: "We are sincerely and seriously committed to peace.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2006
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka -- Powerful explosions rocked a southern tourist and port town in Sri Lanka yesterday when suicide bombers detonated two boats packed with explosives near a naval base. The terrorist attack, the first on Sri Lanka's southern coast, was attributed to the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, the militant separatist group. The Tigers have been battling the government for years, demanding the creation of an independent state in the northern and eastern parts of the country, where the Tamil minority is predominant.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 2006
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka -- Powerful explosions rocked a southern tourist and port town in Sri Lanka yesterday when suicide bombers detonated two boats packed with explosives near a naval base. The terrorist attack, the first on Sri Lanka's southern coast, was attributed to the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, the militant separatist group. The Tigers have been battling the government for years, demanding the creation of an independent state in the northern and eastern parts of the country, where the Tamil minority is predominant.
NEWS
November 18, 1994
For many people on this planet, the big election this month was in Sri Lanka. The outcome offers a hope, finally, of peace in that strife-torn island nation (population: 18 million) off the southern tip of India. That is not assured, but it is what the voters sought.The winner, Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga, became prime minister in August after her People's Alliance Party narrowly won parliamentary elections. She put on a peace blitz, negotiating with the secessionist Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, and won the presidential election by an authoritative 62 percent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka - Sri Lanka's president declared a state of emergency yesterday, deepening a political crisis in the country and giving herself sweeping powers to ban assemblies, detain people without cause and censor news reports. The move came a day after the president, Chandrika Kumaratunga, suspended the country's parliament, took control of the powerful defense, interior and media ministries and deployed a small number of troops at key government buildings. Political analysts said the actions were an attempt by the president to undermine her longtime political rival, Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, who is in Washington, where he met yesterday with President Bush.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 31, 2006
NEW DELHI -- The massacre of 17 aid workers in war-torn Sri Lanka this month was almost certainly committed by government troops, international cease-fire monitors said yesterday. In a finding that drew furious official reaction, the independent Sri Lanka Monitoring Mission concluded that "there cannot be any other armed groups than the security forces who could actually have been behind" the Aug. 4 execution-style killings, which caused an international outcry. The victims, employees of the French humanitarian group Action Against Hunger, were working on tsunami-relief projects in northeast Sri Lanka.
NEWS
November 2, 1999
Charles Greenleaf Sweet, 81, who presided over the trial of two of the murderers of United Mine Workers union reformer Joseph "Jock" Yablonski and his family, died Saturday of heart failure in Tampa, Fla. He served two 10-year terms as president judge in Washington County, Pa.Immanuel Jakobovits,78, Britain's former chief rabbi and a refugee from Nazi Germany who became the first Jewish religious leader to be appointed to a seat in the House of Lords, died...
NEWS
July 18, 1993
Sherry Kohlenberg,Sherry Kohlenberg, 37, one of President Clinton's "Faces of Hope," died of breast cancer Wednesday in Richmond, Va. Ms. Kohlenberg was one of 53 people from around the United States honored by the Clinton administration during inaugural festivities in January. Ms. Kohlenberg was the risk manager for Medical College of Virginia Hospitals and one of the founders of the Virginia Breast Cancer Foundation.* A.K. Ramanujan,A.K. Ramanujan, 64, a poet, author and Indian literature scholar, died Tuesday from complications during during surgery in Chicago.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
Six South Asian arms dealers who paid undercover customs agents in Maryland hundreds of thousands of dollars to ship restricted, high-tech weapons to rebels in Sri Lanka and the Indonesian Army have been arrested by federal authorities in Guam, officials said yesterday. The elaborate sting operation took center stage in Baltimore this summer, where federal agents put up a Singapore arms broker at a four-star Inner Harbor hotel, arranged for him to attend religious services at a mosque in Laurel and took him to a shooting range in Harford County so he could test-fire machine guns they said he was interested in illegally buying.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 31, 2006
NEW DELHI -- The massacre of 17 aid workers in war-torn Sri Lanka this month was almost certainly committed by government troops, international cease-fire monitors said yesterday. In a finding that drew furious official reaction, the independent Sri Lanka Monitoring Mission concluded that "there cannot be any other armed groups than the security forces who could actually have been behind" the Aug. 4 execution-style killings, which caused an international outcry. The victims, employees of the French humanitarian group Action Against Hunger, were working on tsunami-relief projects in northeast Sri Lanka.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Shree Iyengar defies preconceived notions about the likely pastimes of a scientist. While the Severna Park resident has taught chemistry at Anne Arundel Community College for years, he also wrote and published stories and novels in his native language, Tamil, and English. "Science and art, they definitely have one thing in common, and that is imagination," he said. Now, the 58-year-old engages his imagination to explore religious and ethnic stereotypes in modern America in the debut of Namaste, Neighbor!
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 23, 2005
MULLEYAVALAI, Sri Lanka - Compared with the setup Dr. Joseph Angelo has back in Bel Air, Md., the medical office here was unimpressive, just a faded lime-green picnic table of slatted wood and a few small chairs on the bare concrete floor of a schoolroom. There was no electricity to operate equipment, and whatever diagnosis the internist made, there would be only one or two medications available, sometimes decades-old remedies no longer typically used in the United States. But for the people living in or anywhere near this relief camp in northeastern Sri Lanka, this was the best care within reach, and dozens of patients waited in hopes of seeing the doctor.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 9, 2005
KILINOCHCHI, Sri Lanka - In her 12 years as a medic for a rebel Tamil army, Meera saw the worst that war has to offer. Her hands and face, heavily scarred from burns and skin grafts, are testimony to that. But now she has seen what nature can do in minutes. "I have not seen worse than this," said Meera, who like many Tamils goes by only one name. "It's much more lost than on the battlefield." The president of Sri Lanka, Chandrika Kumaratunga, says that on Dec. 26, nature "mocked" the country's nearly two-decade civil war by killing tens of thousands of people and destroying whole communities in less than an hour.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
Harford County doctor Joseph Angelo had planned for months to fly Thursday to his native Sri Lanka, on a three-week mission to help build rudimentary medical clinics in the impoverished Asian nation. That mission of charity was drastically altered - and made more urgent - by the tsunami that slammed the country a week ago. He intended to help build about a dozen clinics. But now he and his colleagues will minister to the nearly 1 million people there who lost loved ones or livelihoods in the tsunami that struck Dec. 26. "Every night, I watch TV and I cry," Angelo, 44, said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2005
Shree Iyengar defies preconceived notions about the likely pastimes of a scientist. While the Severna Park resident has taught chemistry at Anne Arundel Community College for years, he also wrote and published stories and novels in his native language, Tamil, and English. "Science and art, they definitely have one thing in common, and that is imagination," he said. Now, the 58-year-old engages his imagination to explore religious and ethnic stereotypes in modern America in the debut of Namaste, Neighbor!
NEWS
November 7, 1991
Raising taxes to ensure quality of lifeYour Nov. 1 editorial, "Hard Fiscal Choices," says it all. While Schaefer-bashing and down-sizing have become dominant themes in the public dialogue, the time is long past when the governor had control of the allocation of additional spending. In fact, within the past six to eight months, the governor has been in total compliance with his legal responsibility for pruning and cutting total spending.As a recent immigrant from New York, by way of New Jersey, I find that, while Maryland's property taxes are substantial, the income tax is at a 7.5 percent maximum, and the sales tax at a relatively low 5 percent.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2005
Harford County doctor Joseph Angelo had planned for months to fly Thursday to his native Sri Lanka, on a three-week mission to help build rudimentary medical clinics in the impoverished Asian nation. That mission of charity was drastically altered - and made more urgent - by the tsunami that slammed the country a week ago. He intended to help build about a dozen clinics. But now he and his colleagues will minister to the nearly 1 million people there who lost loved ones or livelihoods in the tsunami that struck Dec. 26. "Every night, I watch TV and I cry," Angelo, 44, said.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 16, 2004
MADRAS, India - It all began at one of those gatherings in the countryside where villagers turn out by the thousands to ask movie star Vijaykanth - known as the John Wayne of Tamil cinema - to name their babies. After selecting some names, Vijaykanth told his adoring supporters that he deplored the political situation in their impoverished state of Tamil Nadu, pointedly wondering how the son of the leader of the PMK, one of the region's big political parties, just got appointed the country's health minister.
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