Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTamarind
IN THE NEWS

Tamarind

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2004
Got tamarind? If your response is "Got what?" you're not alone - at least in this country, where tamarind is still relatively unknown. In large parts of the world, particularly India and Latin America, tamarind is a taste treasure, and tamarind tea or tamarind water is considered an indispensable beverage for getting through hot weather. I suspect it will increasingly be showing up on American menus as adventurous chefs seek out tantalizing new flavors. One such chef is Diane Bukatman, who five years ago transplanted her For the Love of Food catering business and cooking classes to Reisterstown from New York.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Donna Ellis | January 9, 2014
Curry & Kabob opened its doors last March in what might be among the worst cases of bad timing in Howard County history. It's located in the Wilde Lake Village Center in an area that's still open for business during a massive construction project that will permanently change the face and ambiance of Columbia's first village center. This 60-seat eatery combines Indian and Nepalese cuisines and occupies the space once known as the Tokyo Café.  And even though it's a tad difficult to get to, what with the less-than-lavish parking area nearby, Curry & Kabob is well worth the effort.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Cicely Wedgeworth and Cicely Wedgeworth,Los Angeles Times | March 26, 2008
Walk into almost any taqueria and you can get agua de tamarindo, a refreshingly tangy Mexican drink made from tamarind fruit. But tamarind is not just Mexican, and tamarindo is not just a drink. Wonderfully zingy, tart and piquant, with an intriguing herbal-floral note, the fruit's flavor shows up in a wide-reaching array of cuisines - Southeast Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Eastern and Northern African, and Caribbean. You find it in a sauce spooned over deep-fried fish in Thailand or with spicy eggplant in India or in a sour soup in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
The 1200 block of East Joppa Road in Towson has its share of bright, shiny chain restaurants, packed to the hilt with people eating the same old bland, homogenized food. But right across the street, in a nondescript business park, sits Spice and Dice, a self proclaimed "Thai-Asian fusion" restaurant that serves vibrant, delicious food in an extremely colorful setting. At first glance, the inside of Spice and Dice resembles a kindergarten classroom. The tables all have different tablecloths, and none of the chairs match in style or color.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 3, 2006, DONALD KENNETH STEIL; beloved husband of Carol Kruse Steil; loving father of Sigrid Steil; devoted son of Geneva Steil and the late Kenneth Steil; dear brother of Jack Steil. Also survived by five nieces and one nephew. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, June 18, 3pm at The Waldorf School of Baltimore, 4801 Tamarind Road, Baltimore, MD 21209.
NEWS
By Zanto Peabody and Zanto Peabody,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
Hawthorn Pond, where neighbors lounging on hammock-strung decks can fish and take pictures of heron and geese in a good year, is full of lore, if not water.There is the story of a woman who, fearing a 12-year-old carp would suffocate in the ankle-high waters, captured the fish and kept it in her bathtub. And what was a palm-sized snapping turtle nursed by Tamarind Association President Allan Blondell and his son is reputed to be the 2-foot-wide submariner that attacks ducks.Residents around the pond, who have spent their time and money keeping water in the public pond for most of the decade, are telling the Columbia Association it is "a feature we don't want to see dry out and be destroyed," Blondell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | September 21, 2011
I've got to admit, I was a little nervous watching Neil Dundee, manager/resident cocktail connoisseur at Tapas Adela, assertively select, then chop, a full jalapeno - seeds and all - to make the restaurant's signature Hot Bourbon. Then, he threw them in the glass and crushed them - "to get the jalapeno juices out" he reassured me. "You need those juices and the seeds to bring out the sweetness of the bourbon. " Maybe it was his confident smile, maybe it was the lush bar décor, maybe it was the sultry Spanish music wafting through this Fells Point tapas spot, but something made me believe him, even for a non-bourbon drinker like me. Adela's Hot Bourbon is one smooth customer.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | August 22, 1993
People in hot climes beat the heat by sipping the nectars of tropical fruits such as soursop, guava, tamarind, passion fruit and mango. These exotic and luscious drinks can also make Maryland's sticky summers more bearable. Here is a collection of recipes: Yvonne Ortiz, a New York-based consultant on Puerto Rican food, gave me the recipe for Luquillo Beach Splash, a pineapple juice, mango and ice cream drink popular at Puerto Rico's palm-lined Luquillo Beach. A second drink shared by Ms. Ortiz, Villa Puerto Rico, is simplicity itself, but long on taste thanks to the intensity of passion fruit and the sweetness of bananas.
NEWS
By Zanto Peabody and Zanto Peabody,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
Hawthorn Pond, where neighbors lounging on hammock-strung decks can fish and take pictures of heron and geese in a good year, is full of lore, if not water.There is the story of a woman who, fearing a 12-year-old carp would suffocate in the ankle-high waters, captured the fish and kept it in her bathtub. And what was a palm-sized snapping turtle nursed by Tamarind Association President Allan Blondell and his son is reputed to be the 2-foot-wide submariner that attacks ducks.Residents around the pond, who have spent their time and money keeping water in the public pond for most of the decade, are telling the Columbia Association it is "a feature we don't want to see dry out and be destroyed," Blondell said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 14, 2007
Maroon tablecloths, attentive service, pleasant music and the tinkle of a fountain help create a relaxing mood at Cafe Spice, a six-month-old Indian restaurant in Towson. But don't get too comfortable - that first bite of samosa or chicken pakora will wake up your taste buds for sure. There's a reason this place isn't called Cafe Bland. Owners Girish and Rani Garg, who opened Cafe Spice in December, make nearly everything from scratch, from delicious naans to flavorful tamarind sauce and creamy mango ice cream.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | September 21, 2011
I've got to admit, I was a little nervous watching Neil Dundee, manager/resident cocktail connoisseur at Tapas Adela, assertively select, then chop, a full jalapeno - seeds and all - to make the restaurant's signature Hot Bourbon. Then, he threw them in the glass and crushed them - "to get the jalapeno juices out" he reassured me. "You need those juices and the seeds to bring out the sweetness of the bourbon. " Maybe it was his confident smile, maybe it was the lush bar décor, maybe it was the sultry Spanish music wafting through this Fells Point tapas spot, but something made me believe him, even for a non-bourbon drinker like me. Adela's Hot Bourbon is one smooth customer.
NEWS
By Cicely Wedgeworth and Cicely Wedgeworth,Los Angeles Times | March 26, 2008
Walk into almost any taqueria and you can get agua de tamarindo, a refreshingly tangy Mexican drink made from tamarind fruit. But tamarind is not just Mexican, and tamarindo is not just a drink. Wonderfully zingy, tart and piquant, with an intriguing herbal-floral note, the fruit's flavor shows up in a wide-reaching array of cuisines - Southeast Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, Chinese, Eastern and Northern African, and Caribbean. You find it in a sauce spooned over deep-fried fish in Thailand or with spicy eggplant in India or in a sour soup in Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | June 14, 2007
Maroon tablecloths, attentive service, pleasant music and the tinkle of a fountain help create a relaxing mood at Cafe Spice, a six-month-old Indian restaurant in Towson. But don't get too comfortable - that first bite of samosa or chicken pakora will wake up your taste buds for sure. There's a reason this place isn't called Cafe Bland. Owners Girish and Rani Garg, who opened Cafe Spice in December, make nearly everything from scratch, from delicious naans to flavorful tamarind sauce and creamy mango ice cream.
NEWS
June 7, 2006
On June 3, 2006, DONALD KENNETH STEIL; beloved husband of Carol Kruse Steil; loving father of Sigrid Steil; devoted son of Geneva Steil and the late Kenneth Steil; dear brother of Jack Steil. Also survived by five nieces and one nephew. A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, June 18, 3pm at The Waldorf School of Baltimore, 4801 Tamarind Road, Baltimore, MD 21209.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
After launching a campaign urging grocery stores to clear their shelves of Mexican-made candy found to contain unsafe levels of lead, the Baltimore City Health Department is working with state lawmakers to introduce legislation that would crack down on the potentially harmful sweets. Nearly three months ago, the Health Department and the Mayor's Office of Hispanic Affairs began warning shop owners and the public about popular candies that have been found elsewhere to be toxic. The Food and Drug Administration then tested numerous samples found in local stores.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | September 29, 2005
For years, grocery store owners Cristobalina and Juan Ramos made certain their shelves were stocked with sticky tamarind candies and lollipops smothered in spicy chili powder. Their kids used to devour them growing up in Puebla, Mexico. And here in Baltimore, the Mexican-made treats have become a favorite among Latino children as well as non-Hispanic adults who, Cristobalina Ramos said, buy the chili-spiked mango lollipops "by the bagful." But they won't anymore. Tests have found that the popular candies contain dangerous levels of lead, according to city health officials, potentially exacerbating a poisoning problem that has troubled Baltimore for decades through paint, dust and even school water fountains.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2012
The 1200 block of East Joppa Road in Towson has its share of bright, shiny chain restaurants, packed to the hilt with people eating the same old bland, homogenized food. But right across the street, in a nondescript business park, sits Spice and Dice, a self proclaimed "Thai-Asian fusion" restaurant that serves vibrant, delicious food in an extremely colorful setting. At first glance, the inside of Spice and Dice resembles a kindergarten classroom. The tables all have different tablecloths, and none of the chairs match in style or color.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
After launching a campaign urging grocery stores to clear their shelves of Mexican-made candy found to contain unsafe levels of lead, the Baltimore City Health Department is working with state lawmakers to introduce legislation that would crack down on the potentially harmful sweets. Nearly three months ago, the Health Department and the Mayor's Office of Hispanic Affairs began warning shop owners and the public about popular candies that have been found elsewhere to be toxic. The Food and Drug Administration then tested numerous samples found in local stores.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2004
Got tamarind? If your response is "Got what?" you're not alone - at least in this country, where tamarind is still relatively unknown. In large parts of the world, particularly India and Latin America, tamarind is a taste treasure, and tamarind tea or tamarind water is considered an indispensable beverage for getting through hot weather. I suspect it will increasingly be showing up on American menus as adventurous chefs seek out tantalizing new flavors. One such chef is Diane Bukatman, who five years ago transplanted her For the Love of Food catering business and cooking classes to Reisterstown from New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2002
FROM the outside, India Palace doesn't look much like "Baltimore's Taj Mahal of Indian restaurants" (as its carryout menu claims it is). In fact, were it not for the sandwich board placed on the sidewalk near the Long Reach Village Center's Safeway, one might not even know that there's a restaurant here at all, tucked away overlooking an interior courtyard. Step inside, however, and India Palace assumes a more regal air. Chandeliers and sparkling glass sconces cast a warm glow over the pink walls and white linen tablecloths.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.