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NEWS
April 13, 2006
In 2003, Mary Ann Saar jumpstarted the opening of a promising program that helps nonviolent female inmates develop healthy relationships with their newborn children. But now Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, which Ms. Saar directs, wants to stop funding the program, known as Tamar's Children, mainly because of disputes between the two providers who actually run it. That's simply unacceptable; the program must continue. Tamar's Children puts offenders in a community setting in Baltimore and offers residential and out-patient services that help them get past their issues of trauma, substance abuse and mental health disorders to form better bonds with their children, particularly in the critical first few months.
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NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
Tamar's Children is back - somewhat - for now. The popular but troubled alternative-to-prison program for new mothers and their babies won an unexpected reprieve when the Court of Special Appeals reversed an earlier decision siding with the state in its efforts to close the program this month. St. Ambrose convent in Northwest Baltimore, where the program has been housed for most of its three years, reopened its doors yesterday evening to two of the four women who had not completed the inpatient part of Tamar's Children.
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NEWS
September 27, 2002
AFTER MOUNT VERNON residents vehemently opposed locating Tamar's Children, a program for pregnant inmates, in their neighborhood, Maryland's top prison official vowed to keep searching for a site for the innovative project. But a month later -- and now 18 months after advocates got the go-ahead for the project -- the program still hasn't opened. What a shame that such a good idea, backed by nearly everyone involved, can't overcome bureaucratic snags and delays to become a reality. In the last month, prison officials say, they offered project coordinators space at the Walter P. Carter Center, a state mental health facility in the city.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 22, 2006
The women and babies gathered among toys and strollers in the living room of a convent in Northwest Baltimore to watch what was to be the final graduation for Tamar's Children. At the ceremony this week, homemade videotapes rolled one after another, each beginning with shots of a very pregnant woman and ending with a mother cooing at her gurgling baby. Joe Cocker's "You Are So Beautiful" provided the soundtrack. After watching her video and listening to other mothers give her words of encouragement, Tracey Johnson, 29, stood up, balancing her smiling 4-month-old on her left hip, to accept her graduation certificate.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Public safety officials have decided to end a popular alternative-to-prison program for pregnant women and new mothers called Tamar's Children, saying yesterday that they will not renew a contract that expires April 21. The nine mothers now in the program will likely be moved to private residential treatment facilities under contract with the state to finish their counseling. "It's going to be difficult for the women to recover from this news," said Laura Cain of the Maryland Disability Center, which represents the women in the program.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
County engineers are studying the design of Tamar Drive, traffic volume and speed in response to parents' concerns that the road is unsafe for children to cross unassisted near Jeffers Hill Elementary School.The county Traffic Engineering Division expects to complete its evaluation of Tamar Drive and recommend changes that could help slow traffic, said C. Edward Walter, division chief.The traffic division must make a recommendation to the county Police Department before an additional crossing guard could be hired.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Christina Sexton tossed and turned in the women's detention center maternity ward last month, wondering what would happen to her first baby when it arrived. "After I was arrested, I just kept praying and praying and praying, `God, please let me keep my baby,'" said Sexton, 25. The outlook was disheartening. Many women inmates in Maryland give birth while shackled to a hospital bed, and all are separated from their newborns and returned to their prison cells. But Sexton was given a chance to stay with her baby -- and to try to set her life on a new course -- with the opening this month of Tamar's Children, an innovative program to help pregnant inmates bond with their babies.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
POLICE LOG* Long Reach: 5900 block of Tamar Drive: A red 1993 Subaru Impreza four-door with Maryland tags 329AVW was stolen Monday, police said.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
POLICE* Long Reach: 5900 block of Tamar Drive: Someone inserted a piece of metal in a keyhole in a front-door knob between 10 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
Four women and their babies -- the last participants in an alternative-to-prison program called Tamar's Children -- will likely be forced to leave their residential treatment center tomorrow because of a court decision yesterday. The Court of Special Appeals granted an emergency motion by the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services to temporarily stop a Baltimore circuit judge's order last week to keep Tamar's Children operating until July. "This could not have been handled worse," said Irene Smith, a lawyer for the Maryland Disability Law Center, which represents the mothers in Tamar's Children.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Tamar's Children can still be saved On behalf of the women of Tamar's Children, I hope to disabuse state Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar of the misinformation she has apparently received ("Judge extends prison alternative," April 13). First, the effort by the women who are part of the Tamar's Children program to save the program is not the cause of their distress. As the secretary knows, these women, who all have histories of trauma, were only a short time ago mired in a cycle of substance abuse treatment and relapse, homelessness and incarceration.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Baltimore Circuit Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan ordered yesterday that Tamar's Children, an alternative-to-prison program for new mothers, remain open until July 1. But public safety officials said they plan to end the popular program when their contract with one of the treatment providers ends next week -- and that they will appeal Kaplan's ruling. Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar, who helped launch Tamar's Children as one of her first acts as secretary, said yesterday in an interview before Kaplan's hearing that the program is "way beyond saving."
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
Public safety officials have decided to end a popular alternative-to-prison program for pregnant women and new mothers called Tamar's Children, saying yesterday that they will not renew a contract that expires April 21. The nine mothers now in the program will likely be moved to private residential treatment facilities under contract with the state to finish their counseling. "It's going to be difficult for the women to recover from this news," said Laura Cain of the Maryland Disability Center, which represents the women in the program.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
A week ago, employees of an acclaimed alternative-to-prison program called Tamar's Children were forced to pack their boxes and leave the new mothers with whom they had bonded. Yesterday, after an emotional court hearing complete with crying babies and their crying mothers, a Baltimore Circuit judge sided with the fired employees, ordering that they be allowed to return to their jobs immediately - even as Tamar presses forward with its contract-dispute lawsuit against the state. "This is not just a contract," said Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2006
A Howard County teenager accused in the shooting of a 4-year-old Columbia boy as he colored behind his family's living room couch two weeks ago was being held at the Howard County Detention Center yesterday on charges of first- and second-degree attempted murder and assault and of reckless endangerment. A judge denied bail yesterday to Tion Jamaar Bell, 18, of the 8800 block of Tamar Drive in Columbia, who surrendered Wednesday evening in the wounding Jan. 20 of Fahad Islam, a pre-kindergartner at Phelps Luck Elementary.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Christina Sexton tossed and turned in the women's detention center maternity ward last month, wondering what would happen to her first baby when it arrived. "After I was arrested, I just kept praying and praying and praying, `God, please let me keep my baby,'" said Sexton, 25. The outlook was disheartening. Many women inmates in Maryland give birth while shackled to a hospital bed, and all are separated from their newborns and returned to their prison cells. But Sexton was given a chance to stay with her baby -- and to try to set her life on a new course -- with the opening this month of Tamar's Children, an innovative program to help pregnant inmates bond with their babies.
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