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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | December 20, 2006
El Salto 5513 Ritchie Highway, Brooklyn Park -- 410-789-1621 Hours --11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays; noon-10 p.m. Saturdays; noon-9 p.m. Sundays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --4 minutes An order of three tamales, $7.09, also included a bag of chips and a side of plain tomato salsa. The tamales were covered in ground beef, melted cheese and tomato sauce. But they were flatter than the other tamales we tried, and had the least amount of chicken.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | December 13, 2012
Twelve chefs remain, on 12/12/12. Ominous! We join the gang in the stew room just after last week's blood bath. Brooke is in tears, John is pouring booze. Josh is grateful he didn't get sent home for his pork dish, what with his restaurant being called "Divine Swine" and all. The next morning, Padma introduces octogenarian Grand Forks Herald restaurant critic Marilyn Haggerty, who shot to internet stardom with a review of the Olive Garden that went viral last summer. Marilyn fills the chefs in on all the amazing things she has done over the last year -- including a book deal with Anthony Bourdain.
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FEATURES
By Brad Schleicher | February 10, 2007
What it is -- A new, chewy, mint-flavored candy by Hot Tamales What we like about it --The flavor isn't overpowering, yet the candy can freshen breath and satisfy the sweet tooth at the same time. Fans of the original cinnamon-charged Hot Tamales might not care for the cool mint, but they should still give these a try. What it costs --79 cents for a 2-ounce package Where to buy --Available at grocery stores Per serving --200 calories, 0 grams fat, 51 grams carbohydrate, 0 grams protein, 0 grams fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 30 milligrams sodium
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
A private chef in Washington had ordered 200 for his "very exclusive" New Year's Eve party. A California transplant living in Baltimore wanted a variety pack of 30 for her own year-end shindig. And a Mexican immigrant, acting out a near-daily ritual, said she'd be buying three of the $1.75 treats, one for now and two for later. It's always tamale time at Michelle's Cafe in Fells Point, but on Wednesday, as throughout this holiday season, the cornmeal concoctions were practically flying out of the steamer.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
A private chef in Washington had ordered 200 for his "very exclusive" New Year's Eve party. A California transplant living in Baltimore wanted a variety pack of 30 for her own year-end shindig. And a Mexican immigrant, acting out a near-daily ritual, said she'd be buying three of the $1.75 treats, one for now and two for later. It's always tamale time at Michelle's Cafe in Fells Point, but on Wednesday, as throughout this holiday season, the cornmeal concoctions were practically flying out of the steamer.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2005
I think we all should be rooting for Mazatlan Mexican Grill, a cheerful burrito and tamale place that launched itself a month ago in the middle of Carney, sandwiched between a convenience store and an adult video and novelty shop. Carney? Well, at least there won't be too much competition from other Mexican carryouts in the area. The owners are still feeling their way along. Red tile and blue paint give the room a little brightness, but the space still has the feel of a work in progress.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- As the Clinton inaugural began yesterday, the victuals in the nation's capital took on an Arkansas flavor.Down on The Mall, George Eldridge of Doe's Eats Place in Little Rock sold tamales as fast as he could heat them up. Back in Arkansas, he said, the dish was a favorite of his one longtime customers, President-elect Bill Clinton."
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - Anyone looking for a fiesta - make that FIESTA! - need search no farther than this narrow strip of marshy waterfront that is the summer home of Mexican women who do the dirty work in Maryland's seafood industry. It's been 2 1/2 months of monotonous labor since they arrived on the Eastern Shore in June, bleary from a four-day bus trip that began in the small mountain village of Palomas and other towns in central Mexico. Like the workers in a dozen or so packing houses on the island, the women at Charles H. Parks and Co. have already picked mountains of crabmeat this summer, averaging 400 pounds a day packaged under the Capt.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | November 21, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- Wages were so low at the clothing factory where 34-year-old Maria Leticia worked that she quit, and last week she started her own business: selling tamales and tacos from a rusted shopping cart on a street corner.If she sells 12 tamales per day -- at a cost of 70 cents each -- she will make more than her weekly factory salary."Imagine that," she says. "I have four children to raise. I couldn't stay at the factory."Her customers understand her plight well. They work at a garment factory one block away from the corner where Maria Leticia sells her tamales -- cornmeal and spicy chicken wrapped in moist banana leaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 1997
If your auto insurance has lapsed, or if you're just a nervous driver, please disregard what I am about to say: You need to get in the car, drive as fast as the law will allow to the block of Broadway just south of Pratt Street, buy a bagful of food at Rotisseria and dive into it before you even back out of your parking space. Roast chicken isn't the easiest thing to eat in the car, and it's tough to dip the pupusas in their sauce if you have a manual transmission, but it's worth a few upholstery stains.
FEATURES
By Brad Schleicher | February 10, 2007
What it is -- A new, chewy, mint-flavored candy by Hot Tamales What we like about it --The flavor isn't overpowering, yet the candy can freshen breath and satisfy the sweet tooth at the same time. Fans of the original cinnamon-charged Hot Tamales might not care for the cool mint, but they should still give these a try. What it costs --79 cents for a 2-ounce package Where to buy --Available at grocery stores Per serving --200 calories, 0 grams fat, 51 grams carbohydrate, 0 grams protein, 0 grams fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 30 milligrams sodium
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | December 20, 2006
El Salto 5513 Ritchie Highway, Brooklyn Park -- 410-789-1621 Hours --11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays; noon-10 p.m. Saturdays; noon-9 p.m. Sundays Restaurant's estimate --5 minutes Ready in --4 minutes An order of three tamales, $7.09, also included a bag of chips and a side of plain tomato salsa. The tamales were covered in ground beef, melted cheese and tomato sauce. But they were flatter than the other tamales we tried, and had the least amount of chicken.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - Anyone looking for a fiesta - make that FIESTA! - need search no farther than this narrow strip of marshy waterfront that is the summer home of Mexican women who do the dirty work in Maryland's seafood industry. It's been 2 1/2 months of monotonous labor since they arrived on the Eastern Shore in June, bleary from a four-day bus trip that began in the small mountain village of Palomas and other towns in central Mexico. Like the workers in a dozen or so packing houses on the island, the women at Charles H. Parks and Co. have already picked mountains of crabmeat this summer, averaging 400 pounds a day packaged under the Capt.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2005
I think we all should be rooting for Mazatlan Mexican Grill, a cheerful burrito and tamale place that launched itself a month ago in the middle of Carney, sandwiched between a convenience store and an adult video and novelty shop. Carney? Well, at least there won't be too much competition from other Mexican carryouts in the area. The owners are still feeling their way along. Red tile and blue paint give the room a little brightness, but the space still has the feel of a work in progress.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
An enormous pot blows off steam on Susanna Cruz's stove as her extended family trickles in from work and school. If it were summertime in any other Maryland household, the 36-quart vaporera might hold that day's crab harvest. But it is Christmastime, and in Anne Arundel County, where the Hispanic population has more than doubled in the last decade, Susanna Cruz and her sister Rosalie are making dozens of tamales - cornmeal dough stuffed with something spicy or sweet, wrapped in corn husks and steamed.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - This time, there was no managerial tirade. The little jars in the visiting clubhouse with all the goodies - Twizzlers, Snickers and Hot Tamales - were still intact. The Orioles had just been embarrassed yesterday in a 10-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, their second defeat in three games at Tropicana Field, but none of the tables or garbage cans had been overturned. It was first-year manager Lee Mazzilli's moment, and he chose to let it pass. "I didn't say anything [to the team]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Alice Fallon Yeskey | December 13, 2012
Twelve chefs remain, on 12/12/12. Ominous! We join the gang in the stew room just after last week's blood bath. Brooke is in tears, John is pouring booze. Josh is grateful he didn't get sent home for his pork dish, what with his restaurant being called "Divine Swine" and all. The next morning, Padma introduces octogenarian Grand Forks Herald restaurant critic Marilyn Haggerty, who shot to internet stardom with a review of the Olive Garden that went viral last summer. Marilyn fills the chefs in on all the amazing things she has done over the last year -- including a book deal with Anthony Bourdain.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - This time, there was no managerial tirade. The little jars in the visiting clubhouse with all the goodies - Twizzlers, Snickers and Hot Tamales - were still intact. The Orioles had just been embarrassed yesterday in a 10-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, their second defeat in three games at Tropicana Field, but none of the tables or garbage cans had been overturned. It was first-year manager Lee Mazzilli's moment, and he chose to let it pass. "I didn't say anything [to the team]
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 21, 2004
Everybody wants to find that little hole-in-the-wall that serves enormous portions of good ethnic food at rock-bottom prices. La Cazuela, a new Ecuadorean restaurant in Upper Fells Point, would be my latest candidate -- except that it's not a hole-in-the-wall. It could be. Owners Enrique Tapia and his wife, Marina Valverde, started with a vacant storefront on a rundown block of Eastern just off Broadway, and they clearly didn't have the money for big-budget decorating. But they created a fresh, cheerful little restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 1997
If your auto insurance has lapsed, or if you're just a nervous driver, please disregard what I am about to say: You need to get in the car, drive as fast as the law will allow to the block of Broadway just south of Pratt Street, buy a bagful of food at Rotisseria and dive into it before you even back out of your parking space. Roast chicken isn't the easiest thing to eat in the car, and it's tough to dip the pupusas in their sauce if you have a manual transmission, but it's worth a few upholstery stains.
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