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By Andrew Ratner | June 21, 1997
MY SON DIDN'T become a parent until his last day in fourth grade. That was the day his aunt sent him a Tamagotchi, said to be Japanese for ''lovable egg.'' It's the hottest toy among pre-teens and young adults in their early 20s. It's an import from Asia, where it has been pilloried from Thailand to Taiwan for its obsessive hold on the young.Tamagotchis, and copycat models, are palm-sized, plastic orbs with a liquid-crystal screen that displays a digitized happy face. The owner is supposed to press a button when the ''virtual pet'' beeps that it is ''hungry'' or needs to be ''changed.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 19, 1997
Forget Godzilla vs. Rodan. Japan's latest clash of the titans pits DigiMon against DigiMon in a fight toy-sellers hope will top the Tamagotchi craze.Of course, that's partly because DigiMon is itself a sort of mutant Tamagotchi. Manufactured by Bandai, the folks responsible for Tamagotchi, DigiMon represents the next wave of virtual pets. They're interactive combat critters that can be connected with other DigiMons to engage in mortal combat -- virtual cockfights, if you will.Isn't that just the cutest thing?
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FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1997
Two months after the Japanese "virtual pet" Tamagotchi appeared in U.S. stores, a Hong Kong company has introduced a competing toy that actually looks like a pet.Cooltec's Pocket Puppy, the company promises, will "take virtual nurturing to a whole new level." The pooch -- a small plastic canine with an LCD screen on his belly and a quintessentially dumb-dog expression on his face -- has a sound chip, which means it can bark, yelp, whine, eat noisily and even sing. A mute button is provided.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 27, 1997
Tamagotchi the GameWhen a toy is as hot as Tamagotchi, the virtual reality pet, you know a host of products has to follow. Now you can be the first on your block to own the new soon-to-be must-have "interactive" toy of the summer: Tamagotchi the Game.This is a game for kids from ages 7 and up who are too busy to nurture an electronic Tamagotchi. In playing it, you raise a two-dimensional pet to full size. The game comes with 72 Attention Cards, 4 Growth Meters, 4 Tamagotchi Playing Pieces, a die and a board.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 27, 1997
Tamagotchi the GameWhen a toy is as hot as Tamagotchi, the virtual reality pet, you know a host of products has to follow. Now you can be the first on your block to own the new soon-to-be must-have "interactive" toy of the summer: Tamagotchi the Game.This is a game for kids from ages 7 and up who are too busy to nurture an electronic Tamagotchi. In playing it, you raise a two-dimensional pet to full size. The game comes with 72 Attention Cards, 4 Growth Meters, 4 Tamagotchi Playing Pieces, a die and a board.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 19, 1997
Forget Godzilla vs. Rodan. Japan's latest clash of the titans pits DigiMon against DigiMon in a fight toy-sellers hope will top the Tamagotchi craze.Of course, that's partly because DigiMon is itself a sort of mutant Tamagotchi. Manufactured by Bandai, the folks responsible for Tamagotchi, DigiMon represents the next wave of virtual pets. They're interactive combat critters that can be connected with other DigiMons to engage in mortal combat -- virtual cockfights, if you will.Isn't that just the cutest thing?
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
From the Land of the Rising Sun comes another step on the road to the apocalypse: virtual pets. The little, egg-shaped computer games at the end of a keychain -- Tamagotchi (about $15, from Bandai Ltd.) and Giga Pets (about $10, by Tiger Electronics Inc.) -- have overrun Japan, and are now on salke (along with some new imitators in the United States. Retailers are hoping the craze continues here. To put them to the tes, we adopted pets out into two homes -- one with a real pet, one without.
NEWS
By David Grimes | March 11, 1998
I WROTE a while back about Tamagotchis, those battery-powered "virtual" pets that you could feed (or not feed), exercise (or not exercise) and discipline (my personal favorite) without worrying about getting hauled into court by the animal rights nuts.Despite, or perhaps because of, their many annoying qualities, Tamagotchis became immensely popular. The warbling beep of needy Tamagotchis could be heard in classrooms and offices across America. Bleary-eyed executives missed deadlines because they were up all night feeding their toy. The excuse "the dog ate my homework" was replaced with, "I was up until 3 a.m. spanking my Tamagotchi."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.You're Beautiful, James Blunt 2.Check on It, Beyonce and Slim Thug 3.I'm N Luv (Wit a Stripper), T-Pain and Mike Jones 4.Shake That, Eminem 5.Unwritten, Natasha Bedingfield [ Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.Sing-alongs and Lullabies for the Film Curious George, Jack Johnson and Friends 2.High School Musical (soundtrack), Various artists 3.Back to Bedlam (bonus video version), James Blunt 4.In the Sun -- EP, Michael Stipe featuring Chris Martin 5.For Me, It's You (digital version)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Booth Moore and Booth Moore,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 1999
What if finding a mate were as easy as pushing a button? MatchLinC is a new electronic keychain gadget that claims to put an end to time wasted with the wrong person by determining a couple's compatibility in seconds.A la Tamagotchi, the $20 device has been all the rage in Japan for a couple of years but is just hitting stateside.Here's how it works: Answer a true-and-false questionnaire about sex, religion, drug use, how you spend your spare time, etc., and MatchLinC will produce a profile of your personality to store in its memory.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1997
Two months after the Japanese "virtual pet" Tamagotchi appeared in U.S. stores, a Hong Kong company has introduced a competing toy that actually looks like a pet.Cooltec's Pocket Puppy, the company promises, will "take virtual nurturing to a whole new level." The pooch -- a small plastic canine with an LCD screen on his belly and a quintessentially dumb-dog expression on his face -- has a sound chip, which means it can bark, yelp, whine, eat noisily and even sing. A mute button is provided.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | June 21, 1997
MY SON DIDN'T become a parent until his last day in fourth grade. That was the day his aunt sent him a Tamagotchi, said to be Japanese for ''lovable egg.'' It's the hottest toy among pre-teens and young adults in their early 20s. It's an import from Asia, where it has been pilloried from Thailand to Taiwan for its obsessive hold on the young.Tamagotchis, and copycat models, are palm-sized, plastic orbs with a liquid-crystal screen that displays a digitized happy face. The owner is supposed to press a button when the ''virtual pet'' beeps that it is ''hungry'' or needs to be ''changed.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
From the Land of the Rising Sun comes another step on the road to the apocalypse: virtual pets. The little, egg-shaped computer games at the end of a keychain -- Tamagotchi (about $15, from Bandai Ltd.) and Giga Pets (about $10, by Tiger Electronics Inc.) -- have overrun Japan, and are now on salke (along with some new imitators in the United States. Retailers are hoping the craze continues here. To put them to the tes, we adopted pets out into two homes -- one with a real pet, one without.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | December 7, 1997
IF YOU'RE looking for a gift for your favorite computer user, there's plenty of silly stuff around this year to amuse children of all ages.For starters, why not try a digital pet? I know, this sounds like an incredibly stupid concept, but it didn't take long to win me over. Like the real thing, digital pets provide hours of fun and amusement. They also require plenty of care, attention and feeding. But unlike real pets, they won't mess up the house -- all you'll have to clean up is your computer screen.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 20, 1997
For three decades, Americans looked across the Atlantic for the latest in youth-culture hip.Back in the '60s, there were the Beatles and the Stones, Carnaby Street chic and the breathless allure of swinging London. With the '70s, it moved from Bowie-style glam to Sex Pistols punk, as those in the know traded their platforms and eye shadow for torn T-shirts and safety pins. The '80s brought ska, goths and the new romantics, as such bands as Madness, the Cure and Duran Duran moved to the fore.
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