Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTalmud
IN THE NEWS

Talmud

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Noam Neusner | April 12, 1991
On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, Jon Lefkowitz is your average law student. He attends classes, catches up on his studying and worries about upcoming exams at the University of Maryland law school.But on Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, he goes by the first name Shmuel and studies the Talmud, an ancient Jewish law code, at Ner Israel Rabbinical College in Baltimore.The Talmud spans thousands of pages and is one of the most important documents in Judaism, a compilation of both the laws and philosophy of that ancient faith.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Once heralded as "The Jewish Jordan," Tamir Goodman never lived up to the hype. A national celebrity at 17 as a junior at the Talmudical Academy in Pikesville, Goodman faded out of the spotlight by the time he turned 20. Without his disappointments in basketball, Goodman said in an interview this week, he would not be as prepared for the end of his professional playing career in Israel and the beginning of a new one. He will announce his retirement at...
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
Each and every day, Orthodox Jews around the world pause from their worldly pursuits to study a page from the Talmud, the collection of Jewish law and tradition.At that pace, it takes 7 1/2 years to study the 2,711 pages of the Talmud.Yesterday, Orthodox Jews who participate in a study program called Daf Yomi -- Hebrew for "page a day" -- completed that seemingly Herculean task and gathered for celebrations in 13 cities around the world, including Baltimore.More than 2,000 people gathered at the Baltimore Convention Center last night, where they watched a satellite hookup of a program that was televised live from Madison Square Garden and the Nassau Coliseum in New York.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | December 1, 2007
Tamir Goodman is coming home. And this time, he'll gladly leave his old nickname behind him, stashed with all the hype and unmet expectations that became such a burden. Goodman, dubbed the "Jewish Jordan" by Sports Illustrated during his junior year at Talmudical Academy in Baltimore, will join the Maryland Nighthawks of the new Premier Basketball League after playing professionally in Israel. He'll be introduced to the media Wednesday at a news conference at Georgetown Prep, and his first game will be in January.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2002
Jews may be in the habit of wishing one another "mazel tov" at weddings and bar mitzvahs, but the Hebrew expression for good luck is more than a congratulatory salute. "Mazel" means constellation, so celebrants are exchanging the blessing of good fortune and destiny. Even so, Jews should not run their day according to the latest horoscope or remain resigned to their fate because they were born under a particular planet, a Columbia rabbi says. "If you have faith in God, ask God directly to look out for you," said Rabbi Hillel Baron, director of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2002
Jews might be in the habit of wishing one another "mazel tov" at weddings and bar mitzvahs, but the Hebrew expression for good luck is more than a congratulatory salute. "Mazel" means constellation, so celebrants are exchanging the blessing of good fortune and destiny. Even so, Jews should not run their day according to the latest horoscope or remain resigned to their fate because they were born under a particular planet, a Columbia rabbi says. "If you have faith in God, ask God directly to look out for you," said Rabbi Hillel Baron, director of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Rabbi Sheftel Neuberger cracks the door to the study hall at Ner Israel Rabbinical College and beams as a torrent of conversation that sounds like a Middle Eastern marketplace pours out. Inside, hundreds of students dressed in white shirts, black trousers and yarmulkes are boisterously debating Talmudic texts in English peppered with Hebrew and Aramaic. Facing off across tables piled high with books, "the boys," as Neuberger calls his students, analyze and cajole, scribble notes and wag their fingers, each trying to convince the other of the merits of his argument.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
On Tuesday, January 9, 2007, REBECCA BECKER of Silver Spring, MD, beloved wife of the late William E. Becker, devoted mother of David L. (Barbara) Becker and the late Judith R. Spitzer. Also survived by ten grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson. Interment services will be held on Friday, January 12, 1 P.M., at Ohev Sholom Talmud Torah Congregation Cemetery, Washington, DC. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to ALS Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to Edward Sagel Funeral Directions, Inc., Rockville, MD, 800-217-9403.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Eliot Shimoff, a longtime psychology professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Jewish scholar who led an e-mail study group for students of the Talmud, died Saturday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. A resident of Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood, Dr. Shimoff died on his 61st birthday after a three-year struggle with a rare form of prostate cancer, his family said. Dr. Shimoff was a fixture of UMBC's psychology department for more than three decades.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
Lubavitch Center is sponsoring a running group The Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education will sponsor a Sunday morning running group, meeting weekly with Rabbi Hillel Baron at 7:30 a.m. at the center, 770 Howes Lane, Columbia. The group aims to boost spiritual and physical energy with readings from meditations of the Lubavitcher Rebbe and a three-mile run. The pace will be about 12 minutes a mile, Rabbi Baron said. There is no cost. All-night Torah study, a traditional part of the celebration of the holiday of Shavuot, commemorating the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, will be held from 11:30 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. Monday at the center.
NEWS
January 11, 2007
On Tuesday, January 9, 2007, REBECCA BECKER of Silver Spring, MD, beloved wife of the late William E. Becker, devoted mother of David L. (Barbara) Becker and the late Judith R. Spitzer. Also survived by ten grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandson. Interment services will be held on Friday, January 12, 1 P.M., at Ohev Sholom Talmud Torah Congregation Cemetery, Washington, DC. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to ALS Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to Edward Sagel Funeral Directions, Inc., Rockville, MD, 800-217-9403.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
Lubavitch Center is sponsoring a running group The Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education will sponsor a Sunday morning running group, meeting weekly with Rabbi Hillel Baron at 7:30 a.m. at the center, 770 Howes Lane, Columbia. The group aims to boost spiritual and physical energy with readings from meditations of the Lubavitcher Rebbe and a three-mile run. The pace will be about 12 minutes a mile, Rabbi Baron said. There is no cost. All-night Torah study, a traditional part of the celebration of the holiday of Shavuot, commemorating the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, will be held from 11:30 p.m. to 4:30 a.m. Monday at the center.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2004
Eliot Shimoff, a longtime psychology professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Jewish scholar who led an e-mail study group for students of the Talmud, died Saturday at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center & Hospital. A resident of Baltimore's Mount Washington neighborhood, Dr. Shimoff died on his 61st birthday after a three-year struggle with a rare form of prostate cancer, his family said. Dr. Shimoff was a fixture of UMBC's psychology department for more than three decades.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2003
Rabbi Sheftel Neuberger cracks the door to the study hall at Ner Israel Rabbinical College and beams as a torrent of conversation that sounds like a Middle Eastern marketplace pours out. Inside, hundreds of students dressed in white shirts, black trousers and yarmulkes are boisterously debating Talmudic texts in English peppered with Hebrew and Aramaic. Facing off across tables piled high with books, "the boys," as Neuberger calls his students, analyze and cajole, scribble notes and wag their fingers, each trying to convince the other of the merits of his argument.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and Rich Scherr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 23, 2002
Tamir Goodman, the local basketball phenom once dubbed the "Jewish Jordan" for his flamboyant play at Talmudical Academy, a small Pikesville school for Orthodox Jews, has signed a three-year deal to play for Israel's top professional team. Goodman, a 6-foot-3 guard who left Towson University's basketball team following an alleged locker room incident with coach Michael Hunt in December, will play for Maccabi Tel Aviv, the Baltimore Jewish Times first reported. "This is what I've been pointing to, ultimately, my entire life," said Goodman, 20. "I've always wanted to play professional basketball in Israel.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2002
Jews might be in the habit of wishing one another "mazel tov" at weddings and bar mitzvahs, but the Hebrew expression for good luck is more than a congratulatory salute. "Mazel" means constellation, so celebrants are exchanging the blessing of good fortune and destiny. Even so, Jews should not run their day according to the latest horoscope or remain resigned to their fate because they were born under a particular planet, a Columbia rabbi says. "If you have faith in God, ask God directly to look out for you," said Rabbi Hillel Baron, director of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
Gershon Kranzler, former Talmudical Academy principal and sociology professor, died Thursday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 84 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. When he arrived at Talmudical Academy in 1955, it was a school of 200 children on Cottage Avenue. When he left in 1967, enrollment had grown to 600 and the school had moved to a new campus. Described as a Renaissance man who combined a profound religious faith with intellectual curiosity, he was the author of 15 children's books, including "The Golden Shoes" and "The Glass Blower of Venice."
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1999
Maryland-bound basketball player Tamir Goodman of Talmudical Academy apparently will transfer out of the 62-student, all-boys school in Pikesville and met yesterday with officials at nearby Beth Tfiloh, according to a source close to the situation.A member of the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association's C Conference, Beth Tfiloh is a coed Jewish school.Goodman is an Orthodox Jew whose faith restricts him from playing from sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday, and Beth Tfiloh "follows those same rules," said MIAA executive secretary Rick Diggs.
NEWS
By Rona S. Hirsch and Rona S. Hirsch,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 2002
Jews may be in the habit of wishing one another "mazel tov" at weddings and bar mitzvahs, but the Hebrew expression for good luck is more than a congratulatory salute. "Mazel" means constellation, so celebrants are exchanging the blessing of good fortune and destiny. Even so, Jews should not run their day according to the latest horoscope or remain resigned to their fate because they were born under a particular planet, a Columbia rabbi says. "If you have faith in God, ask God directly to look out for you," said Rabbi Hillel Baron, director of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education in Columbia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
Gershon Kranzler, former Talmudical Academy principal and sociology professor, died Thursday of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 84 and lived in Northwest Baltimore. When he arrived at Talmudical Academy in 1955, it was a school of 200 children on Cottage Avenue. When he left in 1967, enrollment had grown to 600 and the school had moved to a new campus. Described as a Renaissance man who combined a profound religious faith with intellectual curiosity, he was the author of 15 children's books, including "The Golden Shoes" and "The Glass Blower of Venice."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.