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Tallulah Bankhead

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Here's a cool example of what-goes-around-comes-around: In 1965, a British -made thriller called "Die! Die! My Darling!" hit the movie houses. This study in strangeness and sadism starred the indelibly foggy-voiced, deliciously irreverent Tallulah Bankhead in her last film. She plays Mrs. Trefoile, a religious fanatic who keeps a tight rein on her country house and her suspiciously loyal servants. Obsessed with the recent death of her son, Mrs. Trefoile is only too happy to welcome as a guest her son's former fiancee, the decidedly worldly Patricia Carroll.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
In the second and best installment of “The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour,” the follow-up to “I Love Lucy,” the guest star is Tallulah Bankhead, playing herself as a new neighbor of the Ricardos and Mertzes. During a clash of temperaments, Lucy mockingly imitates Tallulah's famed basso voice and “dahling”-peppered phrases, leading to this exchange: Tallulah: “You do a revolting impression of me.” Lucy: “So do you.” There was a lot of truth in that funny scene, and it finds a telling echo in Matthew Lombardo's entertaining play about Bankhead, “Looped,” currently onstage at the Hippodrome starring a persuasive Stefanie Powers.
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NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
ST. PAUL'S -- Tallulah Bankhead, dahlings, was a world-class actress who lived fast, slept around, drank hard and made herself sick fooling with marijuana and cocaine.As the Alabama-born movie and Broadway star wrote in her memoirs: "I was a hedonist long before I knew what a hedonist was."Today, 25 years after her death, fans still come to her grave in an out-of-the-way Episcopal churchyard in Kent County and remember the raspy-voiced actress with flowers and bourbon.Bankhead was born into a wealthy and politically powerful family -- her father was speaker of the House of Representatives -- and died in New York City Dec. 12, 1968, at age 66 of pneumonia complicated by emphysema.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
T allulah's back, and she's as bawdy as ever. Well, sort of. For the past 42 years, the real Tallulah Bankhead, who will forever be remembered for her baritone-laced husky pronunciation of the word "Daaaaaahling," has been sleeping away the ages in a quiet corner of a Chestertown churchyard, perhaps sipping celestial bourbons and smoking cigarettes while dressed in her trademark full-length fur coat. Last week, she stepped back onto Broadway, courtesy of actress Valerie Harper in "Looped."
NEWS
August 24, 1997
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common decency.- H.L. Mencken"Travails," The Evening SunEducation, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises to the foolish, their lack of understanding.- Ambrose Bierce"The Devil's Dictionary."Soap and education are not as sudden as massacre, but they are often more deadly in the long run.- Mark Twain"Sketches New and Old"What does education often do?
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Calvin W. Schumann, a well-known puppeteer, bar owner, antiques dealer, art collector and bon vivant, died in his sleep yesterday at Maryland General Hospital after a short illness. He was 68 and a longtime resident of Sutton Place Apartments in Baltimore.For more than 40 years, Cal Schumann was one of the city's most colorful and flamboyant characters.His range -- known as the Cal Belt -- extended from Bolton Hill to the bars and restaurants in the Mount Vernon area.Always stylishly dressed, he was a perennial first-nighter at the Mechanic Theatre and Center Stage, usually sitting in the first row. During the cold months, he wore a mink coat to openings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 28, 2010
T allulah's back, and she's as bawdy as ever. Well, sort of. For the past 42 years, the real Tallulah Bankhead, who will forever be remembered for her baritone-laced husky pronunciation of the word "Daaaaaahling," has been sleeping away the ages in a quiet corner of a Chestertown churchyard, perhaps sipping celestial bourbons and smoking cigarettes while dressed in her trademark full-length fur coat. Last week, she stepped back onto Broadway, courtesy of actress Valerie Harper in "Looped."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 9, 2008
On April 28, Madonna's final album for Warner Records - her home base for 25 years - debuts. The first single, a duet with Justin Timberlake titled "4 Minutes," has rocketed up the Top 40 Countdown meter faster than any song in the chart's 38-year history. It is No. 1 on iTunes. Perhaps most significantly, Ellen DeGeneres shimmies to it every day on her TV show. (Ellen now equals Oprah in shaping cultural cravings. If either of these women says, "Buy it! Love it!" - millions do.) So Madonna's swan song for Warner might be her biggest hit ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
When a lavish new production of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I arrives at the Hippodrome next week -- its third stop on an 11-month national tour -- theater fans will have a chance to see the work of one of America's more prodigious actresses. Millions know Stefanie Powers as the glamorous, crime-stopping star of such TV series as The Girl From U.N.C.L.E. (1967-68) and Hart to Hart (1979-84), but in a five-decade career that began in Hollywood at the age of 15, she has also starred in multiple motion pictures (The Interns, McClintock!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
"Everyone has their vices," says Tallulah Bankhead, as reincarnated in Matthew Lombardo's play Looped. "Mine just all come out to play at the same time." The original misbehaving celebrity - if the Alabama-born theater and film actress were around today, she could provide enough fodder for a dozen Entertainment Tonight-type shows for years - Bankhead is ripe for renewed appreciation. Lombardo has crafted an amusing, mostly involving vehicle for that resuscitation, and with Valerie Harper in the driver's seat, Looped gets a spirited spin in the Arena Stage production at the Lincoln Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
"Everyone has their vices," says Tallulah Bankhead, as reincarnated in Matthew Lombardo's play Looped. "Mine just all come out to play at the same time." The original misbehaving celebrity - if the Alabama-born theater and film actress were around today, she could provide enough fodder for a dozen Entertainment Tonight-type shows for years - Bankhead is ripe for renewed appreciation. Lombardo has crafted an amusing, mostly involving vehicle for that resuscitation, and with Valerie Harper in the driver's seat, Looped gets a spirited spin in the Arena Stage production at the Lincoln Theatre.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 9, 2008
On April 28, Madonna's final album for Warner Records - her home base for 25 years - debuts. The first single, a duet with Justin Timberlake titled "4 Minutes," has rocketed up the Top 40 Countdown meter faster than any song in the chart's 38-year history. It is No. 1 on iTunes. Perhaps most significantly, Ellen DeGeneres shimmies to it every day on her TV show. (Ellen now equals Oprah in shaping cultural cravings. If either of these women says, "Buy it! Love it!" - millions do.) So Madonna's swan song for Warner might be her biggest hit ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
When a lavish new production of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I arrives at the Hippodrome next week -- its third stop on an 11-month national tour -- theater fans will have a chance to see the work of one of America's more prodigious actresses. Millions know Stefanie Powers as the glamorous, crime-stopping star of such TV series as The Girl From U.N.C.L.E. (1967-68) and Hart to Hart (1979-84), but in a five-decade career that began in Hollywood at the age of 15, she has also starred in multiple motion pictures (The Interns, McClintock!
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 9, 2000
As the country waits to learn who will be our next president, Tallulah Bankhead is on stage at the Mechanic Theatre, presiding over a fund-raiser for President Harry S. Truman's re-election. The ironies abound. The presidential races in both 1948 and 2000 were breathtakingly close. Fifty-two years ago, the Chicago Tribune erroneously declared Thomas Dewey the winner; yesterday, several papers prematurely ceded the victory to Republican George W. Bush. Both elections made for great theater - more so than the one-woman show at the Mechanic.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
Calvin W. Schumann, a well-known puppeteer, bar owner, antiques dealer, art collector and bon vivant, died in his sleep yesterday at Maryland General Hospital after a short illness. He was 68 and a longtime resident of Sutton Place Apartments in Baltimore.For more than 40 years, Cal Schumann was one of the city's most colorful and flamboyant characters.His range -- known as the Cal Belt -- extended from Bolton Hill to the bars and restaurants in the Mount Vernon area.Always stylishly dressed, he was a perennial first-nighter at the Mechanic Theatre and Center Stage, usually sitting in the first row. During the cold months, he wore a mink coat to openings.
NEWS
August 24, 1997
School days, I believe, are the unhappiest in the whole span of human existence. They are full of dull, unintelligible tasks, new and unpleasant ordinances, brutal violations of common sense and common decency.- H.L. Mencken"Travails," The Evening SunEducation, n.: That which discloses to the wise and disguises to the foolish, their lack of understanding.- Ambrose Bierce"The Devil's Dictionary."Soap and education are not as sudden as massacre, but they are often more deadly in the long run.- Mark Twain"Sketches New and Old"What does education often do?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 9, 2000
As the country waits to learn who will be our next president, Tallulah Bankhead is on stage at the Mechanic Theatre, presiding over a fund-raiser for President Harry S. Truman's re-election. The ironies abound. The presidential races in both 1948 and 2000 were breathtakingly close. Fifty-two years ago, the Chicago Tribune erroneously declared Thomas Dewey the winner; yesterday, several papers prematurely ceded the victory to Republican George W. Bush. Both elections made for great theater - more so than the one-woman show at the Mechanic.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
ST. PAUL'S -- Tallulah Bankhead, dahlings, was a world-class actress who lived fast, slept around, drank hard and made herself sick fooling with marijuana and cocaine.As the Alabama-born movie and Broadway star wrote in her memoirs: "I was a hedonist long before I knew what a hedonist was."Today, 25 years after her death, fans still come to her grave in an out-of-the-way Episcopal churchyard in Kent County and remember the raspy-voiced actress with flowers and bourbon.Bankhead was born into a wealthy and politically powerful family -- her father was speaker of the House of Representatives -- and died in New York City Dec. 12, 1968, at age 66 of pneumonia complicated by emphysema.
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