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NEWS
September 3, 2014
In the wake of Russia's increasingly belligerent behavior in Ukraine, President Barack Obama delivered a ringing declaration of NATO's support for the Baltic countries Wednesday in the capital of Estonia, a former Soviet Republic and current NATO member that also has reason to fear Russian aggression. Mr. Obama vowed the U.S. and NATO would honor the alliance's pledge of collective defense and back it up with a beefed-up troop presence and air patrols. He also pointed to NATO's decision to create a rapid reaction force and pre-positioning of military equipment in the region as evidence of the alliance's resolve to defend its members.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2014
In the wake of Russia's increasingly belligerent behavior in Ukraine, President Barack Obama delivered a ringing declaration of NATO's support for the Baltic countries Wednesday in the capital of Estonia, a former Soviet Republic and current NATO member that also has reason to fear Russian aggression. Mr. Obama vowed the U.S. and NATO would honor the alliance's pledge of collective defense and back it up with a beefed-up troop presence and air patrols. He also pointed to NATO's decision to create a rapid reaction force and pre-positioning of military equipment in the region as evidence of the alliance's resolve to defend its members.
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NEWS
May 25, 1999
Lembit Oll, 33, a chess grandmaster, jumped to his death from a window of his fourth-floor apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, an apparent suicide, newspapers reported Wednesday. Recent rankings placed him about 50th in the world.Augustos Pablo, , 46, a Jamaican musician popular in Europe and known for his plastic melodica (a modified harmonica), died Wednesday after being in a coma for several days. Mr. Pablo had a muscle disease.Pub Date: 5/25/99
TRAVEL
By BEVERLY BEYETTE and BEVERLY BEYETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
VILNIUS, LITHUANIA -- The turrets, the ancient city gates and the cobblestoned streets -- these are the fairy-tale images of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, known collectively as the Baltic States. Since gaining independence in 1991, these northeastern European neighbors, occupied by the Germans during World War II and later forcibly annexed to the Soviet Union, have been bidding to become big-time travel destinations. The capitals -- Tallinn (Estonia), Riga (Latvia) and Vilnius (Lithuania)
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
The United States has opened makeshift embassies in Tallinn, Estonia, and Vilnius, Lithuania, and is offering limited consular services for visiting Americans.In Estonia, Americans in need of emergency services can contact the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Palace, by calling 444-761. In Lithuania, Americans can reach the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Draugyste, by calling 662-711.Lithuanian visas are $25 and can be obtained before leaving the United States or at the border. Estonia, meanwhile, has begun requiring entry visas for U.S. citizens 18 and older.
TRAVEL
By BEVERLY BEYETTE and BEVERLY BEYETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2006
VILNIUS, LITHUANIA -- The turrets, the ancient city gates and the cobblestoned streets -- these are the fairy-tale images of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania, known collectively as the Baltic States. Since gaining independence in 1991, these northeastern European neighbors, occupied by the Germans during World War II and later forcibly annexed to the Soviet Union, have been bidding to become big-time travel destinations. The capitals -- Tallinn (Estonia), Riga (Latvia) and Vilnius (Lithuania)
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 26, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- Five months after declaring independence, the people of this Baltic state are teetering on the brink of economic collapse and political crisis.Fuel oil has almost run out -- many homes have no hot water, and heat has been cut back to a cool 60 degrees Fahrenheit. City officials have begun drawing up plans to evacuate most of Tallinn to the countryside, where people can warm themselves with wood fires.The country has eaten its last crust of white bread, and black bread is rationed at two slices a day per person.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
TALLINN, Estonia - It takes just 18 minutes to get here by helicopter from Helsinki, Finland. But only a fool would take a cramped helicopter, say visiting Finns. They pack a fleet of car ferries, stream here by the thousands every day, and have turned the visa-free, 90-minute crossings into an increasingly essential part of their household economies. "How often do I come here? I think about making the trip every time I need a haircut," said Lauri Aalto, a retired teacher. "The cost difference alone pays for the ferry."
NEWS
October 14, 2005
On Thursday, October 13, 2005, EEVALD AARMA, DVM, age 93, of Towson. Eevald was born in Tallinn, Estonia on December 28, 1911. He came to America in 1955. He moved to Baltimore in 1968. He was the beloved husband of Nelli (nee Kirre-Kruusberg) Aarma. Devoted father of Viivi-Ann Shirley, Viive-Reet Slayback, Piia Mai Aarma and Helle Marie Aarma, brother of Uuno Aarma and Vaike Aarma; grandfather of Elise Reiser, Jill Shirley and Scott Wetzbarger; great grandfather of Liisi Reiser and William Reiser.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- It is a dismal end to glory.On a gray foggy day, four Soviet naval officers sit in a tiny office at a Tallinn minesweeping base, trying to sort out who they are and where they belong.Out the window, a half-dozen navy ships can be seen scattered near the shore. Inside, a captain and three lieutenant commanders sit under the gaze of V. I. Lenin, whose portrait still hangs on the wall.The mighty Soviet military, once pampered with all the tanks and technology it could desire, now considers itself lucky to have bread.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2001
TALLINN, Estonia - It takes just 18 minutes to get here by helicopter from Helsinki, Finland. But only a fool would take a cramped helicopter, say visiting Finns. They pack a fleet of car ferries, stream here by the thousands every day, and have turned the visa-free, 90-minute crossings into an increasingly essential part of their household economies. "How often do I come here? I think about making the trip every time I need a haircut," said Lauri Aalto, a retired teacher. "The cost difference alone pays for the ferry."
NEWS
May 25, 1999
Lembit Oll, 33, a chess grandmaster, jumped to his death from a window of his fourth-floor apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, an apparent suicide, newspapers reported Wednesday. Recent rankings placed him about 50th in the world.Augustos Pablo, , 46, a Jamaican musician popular in Europe and known for his plastic melodica (a modified harmonica), died Wednesday after being in a coma for several days. Mr. Pablo had a muscle disease.Pub Date: 5/25/99
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 26, 1992
TALLINN, Estonia -- Five months after declaring independence, the people of this Baltic state are teetering on the brink of economic collapse and political crisis.Fuel oil has almost run out -- many homes have no hot water, and heat has been cut back to a cool 60 degrees Fahrenheit. City officials have begun drawing up plans to evacuate most of Tallinn to the countryside, where people can warm themselves with wood fires.The country has eaten its last crust of white bread, and black bread is rationed at two slices a day per person.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 15, 1991
The United States has opened makeshift embassies in Tallinn, Estonia, and Vilnius, Lithuania, and is offering limited consular services for visiting Americans.In Estonia, Americans in need of emergency services can contact the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Palace, by calling 444-761. In Lithuania, Americans can reach the U.S. Embassy, at the Hotel Draugyste, by calling 662-711.Lithuanian visas are $25 and can be obtained before leaving the United States or at the border. Estonia, meanwhile, has begun requiring entry visas for U.S. citizens 18 and older.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Staff Writer | June 20, 1993
TALLINN, Estonia -- Scrappy Estonia, among the first of the 15 former Soviet republics to proclaim independence, has struggled to the forefront once more.Less than two years after leaving the Soviet Union, Estonia has surmounted bitter political differences to create a new country. With lightning speed, a coalition government has written a constitution, printed its own money, shifted trade from Russia to the West and dramatically transformed the daily lives of its people."Just look at me," said Estonia's president, Lennart Meri.
SPORTS
August 9, 2010
U.S. sprinter Justin Gatlin clocked 10.17 seconds Sunday in Tallinn, Estonia, to win his second consecutive 100-meter final since coming back from a four-year doping ban. Gatlin, the 2004 Olympic champion, was running at the Ergo World challenge meet as he works toward the 2012 London Olympics. Before Tuesday, when he also ran in Estonia, he had not raced competitively since June 2006 after being banned because of a positive test for testosterone. Gatlin, 28, regained his eligibility in July but was expected to have difficulty finding races because of a Euro Meetings recommendation not to invite athletes who bring disrepute to the sport.
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