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By Scott Dance | June 13, 2012
Gusty northerly winds are meeting the tall ships as they move up the Chesapeake Bay today, and they are also making travels rougher for smaller boats joining the flotilla to the Inner Harbor. A small craft advisory is in effect for the Chesapeake Bay through Thursday afternoon, according to the National Weather Service. Gusts of up to 25 knots -- about 29 mph -- are expected Wednesday afternoon. Steady winds of 15 knots are in the forecast. Waves are about 1 foot high, but can be expected to be higher when winds blow against the tidal direction.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
While hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to descend on Baltimore this weekend to see the ships, fireworks and cannon fire of the "Star-Spangled Spectacular," Jessica Damen is staying home. The festivities are happening outside Damen's door, so the Federal Hill woman decided she'd throw a party and watch the Blue Angels and the tall ships from her rooftop deck. Residents of Federal Hill and Locust Point say they've grown used to the gridlocked traffic, elusive parking and other effects that come with the big weekend events in their neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | June 18, 2012
The tall ships moored around the Baltimore harbor for the Star-Spangled Sailabration will depart just ahead of a brief heat wave setting in Wednesday, meaning one last day of pleasant weather to watch the ships sail away on Tuesday. The tall ships are scheduled to raise their sails and breeze southward in the "Parade of Sail" between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesday. Navy warships will depart before that, from, 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. Winds will be coming from the south-southeast, potentially hampering the tall ships from departing under sail.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 10, 2014
This should have been a totally tall week for Baltimore - tall ships and Blue Angels for War of 1812 commemorations; the Orioles, ever closer to a division title, back home to play the Yankees; Derek Jeter bidding farewell to Camden Yards; the Ravens at M&T Bank Stadium to face their biggest rivals, the Pittsburgh Steelers, Thursday night on national television. Big stuff, tall stuff, a real wow week in the life of Charm City. And it's all still true, except for the clouds left by the Ray Rice storm.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
The reproduction tall ship Pride of Baltimore II returned Friday to Baltimore's Inner Harbor after sailing the Chesapeake Bay, the East Coast and the Great Lakes for five months. The ship, which was built to look like a "1812-era topsail schooner privateer," will sail two more times — from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday — before ending its 2011season. Tickets are $45 for adults and $30 for children 12 and under. Free dockside tours of the deck will also be given between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. On Sunday, park rangers from Fort McHenry will be present on the ship and dressed in period uniforms to learn about the ship's operations from the crew.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Harford County Restaurant Week continues through Sunday, and Maryland Wine Week continues through June 18. And here come the tall ships, and hundreds of thousands of tourists. Start picking. The summer edition of Baltimore Restaurant Week returns on July 27, and the event's website is scheduled to go live on Monday . About 65 restaurants have signed up to participate so far, but the number is sure to grow. Dur­ing the 10-day event, partic­ipating restaurants will offer three-course fixed-price dinner menus for either $20.12 or $30.12 (but not both)
NEWS
May 24, 1992
One of the unique joys of the 1976 bicentennial year was the visit of the tall ships to Baltimore. Over the summer, 11 of those graceful vessels sailed up the Chesapeake to moor at the Inner Harbor basin. Tens of thousands of Baltimoreans came to view them. Even at 4 a.m., night owls could be seen admiring those ocean-goers.Happily for those who missed the 1976 event, those moments and memories will soon be repeated. From May 29 to Sept. 9, close to 30 sailing ships from Spain, Brazil, the Netherlands, Uruguay, Portugal, Italy, Germany and England are scheduled to visit the Inner Harbor as part of Baltimore's Operation Sail '92. They range from tall ships to frigates and schooners.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
It's a mere yellowing piece of paper with a few hundred words scrawled on it, a document that once sat forgotten in a drawer for three-quarters of a century. But this summer, the original manuscript of "The Star-Spangled Banner," the poem Francis Scott Key wrote about a certain inspiring morning in September 1814, will be the centerpiece of a sprawling, multimillion-dollar statewide celebration. On Friday morning, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the schedule of events for Star-Spangled Summer 2014, a three-month tribute that will conclude Maryland's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2013
The sales pitch to 46 uniformed men was simple: Welcome to Baltimore. Next time, bring a tall ship. City and state officials and the nautical community have begun a marketing drive aimed at filling the Inner Harbor with majestic sailing vessels and gray-hulled warships for the War of 1812 commemoration finale, Sept. 6-14, 2014. On Wednesday, they pitched military attaches from 40 countries, including Canada, Mexico, Turkey and Sri Lanka. Navies begin planning their sea exercises and courtesy calls about a year in advance, and there's a lot of jockeying among East Coast seaports to secure the biggest and best ships for summer events.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
More than thirty vessels - tall ships, naval vessels and others - will be visiting Baltimore Wednesday through Sunday for Star-Spangled Spectacular, the bicentennial celebration of the national anthem. And where there are ships, there are hungry, thirsty sailors. Some 50 Baltimore restaurants are offering discounts to visiting sailors and crew members as part of a “Sailors Welcome Here” program, which is is being administered through Sail Baltimore, the non-profit organization responsible for the visiting ships and the crew hospitality for the Star-Spangled Spectacular ships.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Vice President Joe Biden will be in town this weekend, to help Baltimore celebrate its "Star-Spangled Banner" bicentennial. The vice president, who hails from neighboring Delaware, will be at Fort McHenry Saturday night to deliver remarks during a concert that will be broadcast live on PBS, beginning at 8 p.m. His remarks are scheduled for 9:30 p.m. Following Biden's remarks, singer Jordin Sparks will lead a performance of "The Star-Spangled Banner,"...
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 12, 2014
Two years ago, during bicentennial commemorations for the War of 1812, I was struck by how important the waterfront is to Baltimore. That might seem like an odd thing for a Baltimorean to say, but unless you own waterfront property, work near it or regularly take visitors to see it, you take it for granted. Next thing you know, there's some huge event at the Inner Harbor, and you're awed, along with all the other tourists, by the coolness that is the Baltimore waterfront. The Star-Spangled Sailabration was such a glorious event - with thousands of visitors enjoying fine mid-June weather, tall ships and Blue Angels - that it even impressed Baltimore's numerous cynics.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
It's a mere yellowing piece of paper with a few hundred words scrawled on it, a document that once sat forgotten in a drawer for three-quarters of a century. But this summer, the original manuscript of "The Star-Spangled Banner," the poem Francis Scott Key wrote about a certain inspiring morning in September 1814, will be the centerpiece of a sprawling, multimillion-dollar statewide celebration. On Friday morning, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the schedule of events for Star-Spangled Summer 2014, a three-month tribute that will conclude Maryland's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.
NEWS
November 14, 2013
While most might agree that the Inner Harbor is need of a facelift, the proposed pedestrian bridge is not a smart idea ("City to unveil Inner Harbor master plan," Nov. 13). Much has been said in The Sun about the importance of capitalizing on Baltimore's maritime heritage. It is unique, vibrant, colorful and draws large crowds as we witnessed with last year's "Sailabration," an event that is to be repeated on an even grander scale next year as we celebrate the bicentennial of Ft. McHenry's valiant defense of our city.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
THE HOOPLA surrounding America's celebration of its bicentennial in 1976 included an imposing array of tall ships, which conjured up images of harbors cluttered with wooden-hulled boats, masts and sails in the two centuries since the country was founded. Unlike the armada of tall ships which sailed up the East Coast to nestle in Baltimore Harbor this past week, the event of '76 had the ships setting sail from Bermuda to New York, with the majority of them then heading south to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Deborah Vondrak | April 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Through more than seven decades of Soviet oppression, freedom-loving Ukrainians never lost their will to achieve an independent Motherland. They finally achieved that goal in 1991 -- months after the fall of the Berlin Wall -- when Russian troops departed for points east. Now, nine years later, a Ukrainian tall ship appropriately named Bat'kivschchyna -- The Motherland, in English -- is about to leave its berth in the upper reaches of the Dneipper River. As crowds lining the Dniepper's banks cheer it on, the Bat'kivschchyna will emerge into the Black Sea, sail through the Bosporus, negotiate the myriad islands of the Aegean Sea, race through the Mediterranean and slip through the Straits of Gibraltar into the Atlantic.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Race cars speeding down Pratt Street brought Kevin and Debbie Parkhurst the 50 miles from their home in North East to downtown Baltimore for a third consecutive Labor Day weekend this month. "It's the best thing the city's done," Kevin Parkhurst said of the Grand Prix of Baltimore. "It's three full days you have all this activity going on. " But city tourism leaders will have to find another way to draw the Parkhursts and other visitors from around the state, region and world to the city after organizers canceled the race indefinitely due to schedule conflicts.
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