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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Ron Smith, who came to Baltimore 38 years ago as a weekend TV anchorman but found his greatest success on radio as WBAL's "Voice of Reason," died Monday night of pancreatic cancer at his home in Shrewsbury, Pa.. He was 70. Mr. Smith spent more than 26 years on WBAL's airwaves, most of it in the afternoon drive-time period until a move to mornings last year, passionately talking politics from a conservative point of view. But it is not his politics for which he will likely be remembered as much as the informed conversation he helped create on Baltimore radio — and the way he publicly shared his final days with listeners of WBAL and readers of The Baltimore Sun. On Nov. 28, after continuing on-air for more than two months despite having been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer that had metastasized throughout his body, Mr. Smith signed off at the 50,000-watt news-talk station for the last time in his signature straightforward, no-nonsense, radio style.
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FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
A recent Gallup Poll found nearly half of Maryland's residents would like to leave the state. Stephen Colbert seems to have uncovered one possible reason: Baltimore is a "wasteland. " Last week on "The Colbert Report," the Comedy Central talk show host did a segment on global warming pegged to the White House's recent climate change study - which he called "terrifying. " The show pieced together video clips with dire weather predictions: "The Northeast is gonna see more heatwaves.
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NEWS
June 17, 1994
In some editions of Wednesday's Today section in The Sun, the outcome of a national competition to select a talk show host for the America's Talking channel was unclear. Bill McCuddy of Baltimore did win a job as host on the new all-talk cable channel, which will debut July 4.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 1, 2014
Anyone in the news business will tell you that a side benefit is the diverse number of people one gets to meet. Jay Leno, who leaves "The Tonight Show" on Feb 6 after a 22-year run (retire is not the right word in his case), is one such person. The circumstances surrounding our first meeting involved a column I wrote 15 years ago in support of his wife's activism on behalf of Afghan women. Jay and Mavis Leno invited my wife and me for a visit. Things progressed from there.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 6, 1996
Robin Miller, former Baltimore cabbie and sedan service entrepreneur, is back on the road with a "full-tilt white Lincoln stretch," trading as "Robin's Limousine," based in Westminster. He got on the car phone the other day from Crystal City, Va., to offer an explanation for the appearance of all those Grey Poupon jars on limousine dashboards."That's a prom kid thing," Miller snarls. "Every prom kid, after the prom and the dinner that follows, has a need -- a crying need, a burning need -- to ride around Fells Point or downtown, yelling 'Whoo!
FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
A recent Gallup Poll found nearly half of Maryland's residents would like to leave the state. Stephen Colbert seems to have uncovered one possible reason: Baltimore is a "wasteland. " Last week on "The Colbert Report," the Comedy Central talk show host did a segment on global warming pegged to the White House's recent climate change study - which he called "terrifying. " The show pieced together video clips with dire weather predictions: "The Northeast is gonna see more heatwaves.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 4, 1998
SO HERE IT IS. THIS will definitely be my last column about WOLB talk show host C. Miles. But it's not by choice, mind you."Man, I've been fired!" Miles told me Tuesday afternoon, in the first conversation we've had since we debated the shooting death of James Quarles in August 1997. Sun editors had heard for days rumors that Miles had been fired. They were trying to confirm or deny them up to Monday night. Dennis O'Brien, swing-shift rewrite man, was able to get Miles' home number and called him. Moments later, O'Brien paged me."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1995
Ellen Sauerbrey's seven-week stint as a radio talk show host )) left her wanting more."If things work well for me . . . I'll be greatly looking forward to coming back on in the fall," the former Republican gubernatorial candidate said yesterday, before her final 8-11 broadcast last night on WBAL-AM (1090)."I've gotten great feedback. If calls mean anything, I've got a great audience," she said, adding, "three hours of being able to say what's on your mind isn't bad."On Monday, Orioles broadcaster Jon Miller begins a nightly sports conversation show in the time slot -- at least until the strike ends and baseball action returns.
FEATURES
July 29, 1991
Staff writer Sylvia Badger recently interviewed comedian and talk show host Joan Rivers, who was in town for a performance at Merriweather Post Pavilion. Here's what Joan had to say on a number of subjects.Q: If you were interviewing Joan Rivers, what would be the first question you would ask her?A: "Are you sleeping with anyone?"Q: Well?A: Just say that I burst into tears after that question.Q: Is it true there has been a coolness between you and Oprah Winfrey since you won the 1990 Emmy for outstanding talk show host?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1995
Here's the trouble with talk radio, according to Brian Wilson: "It seems to me that the vast number of talk show hosts don't understand that this is not a pulpit."Stay tuned, he's just warming up."I'm not willing to believe the audience is so stupid to care about what I think. What's your opinion? I'm just an ex-disc jockey, my opinion doesn't matter."He's building."This is just a BS session here, the great American BS session. The bottom line is this is show biz. This is aural voyeurism," he concludes with a grin, making sure a visitor has appreciated the pun.You expect a rim shot here, or a horn, whistle or soundtrack of laughter and applause.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Katie Couric probably meant well when she invited "Orange is the New Black" actress Laverne Cox and model Carmen Carrera on her eponymous talk show to discuss transgender-specific issues. After all, transgender women - actual trans women, not trans female characters played by cisgender actors - are still largely absent from network television. Trans issues are largely misunderstood, and trans women of color like Carrera and Cox face particular challenges which aren't often voiced on a national stage.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 5, 2013
I like capitalism. Specifically, I like the idea that if I write a better book, have a better idea, build a better mousetrap, I will be rewarded accordingly. A system where everyone gets the same reward regardless of quality or quantity of work is inconsistent with excellence and innovation, as the mediocrity and inefficiency that beset the Soviet Union readily proves. The woman who is successful under capitalism gets to eat steak and lobster whenever she wants. That's never bothered me. What does bother me is the notion that the unsuccessful man who lacks that woman's talent, resources, opportunities or luck should not get to eat at all. There is something obscene in the notion that a person can work full time for a multinational corporation and earn not enough to keep a roof over his head or food on his table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Chris Hayes, an editor at large of The Nation and host of the talk show bearing his name on MSNBC, was raised in a working-class neighborhood but attended some of the most exclusive schools on the planet. "I grew up in the Bronx," says the affable, 33-year-old anchor of "Up With Chris Hayes. " "My mother was the daughter of an Italian deli owner. But I'm also hugely a product of the meritocracy, and for that reason I have my own affection for it. " Both experiences provided fodder for his much-discussed first book, "Twilight of the Elites: America after Meritocracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Bryan Nehman, co-host of the "Brian and Bryan Show" on Washington's WMAL radio, has been hired by Baltimore's WBAL to replace Dave Durian during morning drive time. Nehman previously anchored morning news on the politically conservative talk and news station in the nation's capital from 2001 to 2011. He's been at the station 12 years. He started as a street reporter, and "was put in the news anchor chair right after 9/11," Nehman said Thursday. "Bryan is one of the brightest young men that I've met, and he is the guy who's going to lead WBAL into the next 20 years of broadcasting," Dave Hill, program director at the station said.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Ron Smith, who came to Baltimore 38 years ago as a weekend TV anchorman but found his greatest success on radio as WBAL's "Voice of Reason," died Monday night of pancreatic cancer at his home in Shrewsbury, Pa.. He was 70. Mr. Smith spent more than 26 years on WBAL's airwaves, most of it in the afternoon drive-time period until a move to mornings last year, passionately talking politics from a conservative point of view. But it is not his politics for which he will likely be remembered as much as the informed conversation he helped create on Baltimore radio — and the way he publicly shared his final days with listeners of WBAL and readers of The Baltimore Sun. On Nov. 28, after continuing on-air for more than two months despite having been diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer that had metastasized throughout his body, Mr. Smith signed off at the 50,000-watt news-talk station for the last time in his signature straightforward, no-nonsense, radio style.
NEWS
November 25, 2011
H.L. Mencken once observed that newspapers, by nature, are bellicose and do not speak in support of anyone or anything unless they absolutely can't help it. There are any number of public figures in Maryland and beyond who would attest to this. But on rare occasion, we have the good fortune to encounter someone who merits words of praise, and so exceptions have to be made. To leave such thoughts to obituary writers alone would, at the very least, deny the living the potentially defibrillating shock of reading them in this forum.
NEWS
By MARGIE ASHE | February 22, 1994
Slavery is still an emotional subject for most Americans. Other than in academic settings, most people avoid mentioning it, especially in racially mixed company.Not so for radio talk show host Les Kinsolving. His repeated references to slavery caught my ear recently. ''Three thousand black people owned slaves,'' he asserted, then followed the claim with the statement that, ''Black soldiers served in the Confederate army.''When I called the station to challenge these statements and at least add some historical context, Mr. Kinsolving questioned my sources and motives.
NEWS
August 16, 1993
Conservative talk shows sow distrustTalk-radio provides a valuable service by giving citizens access to the public airwaves.However, when the debate is controlled by biased ideologues, whether they be liberal Democrats or conservative Republicans, it becomes little more than propaganda.In Maryland, we have conservative propaganda being broadcast daily by WCBM radio.This radio station's constant, hypercritical and personal attacks on President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, without providing any balanced counter-analysis, allows WCBM's conservative talk-show hosts to promote their right-wing political agenda.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Ron Smith went on WBAL radio Thursday, just as he has for the past 27 years. But the conservative talk-show host, who was recently diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, opened his show telling listeners — with characteristic bluntness — that he was abandoning his chemotherapy treatments. Instead, Smith will remain on the air while undergoing palliative care designed to make what time he has left as comfortable as possible. And then he simply went on with the show. "That's the way I've conducted my career," Smith, 69, said Thursday from his home in southern York County, Pa., where he's been doing most of his broadcasting work since announcing his inoperable Stage 4 cancer diagnosis on Oct. 17. "I have never been one to hide anything.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
Fans who looked closely at Maryland's sideline during the season-opening football game may have been puzzled by what they saw on cards held up by team managers. Was that really a photo of TV talk-show host Regis Philbin, and — if so — what could Philbin, a Notre Dame graduate, possibly have to do with Maryland football? Yes, it was a color photo of the co-host of "Live! With Regis and Kelly. " But why the school chose to display Philbin's image remains as much of a local mystery as which color uniforms the Terps will wear on a given week.
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