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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
In an effort to improve its last-place prime-time lineup, CNN is canceling Piers Morgan's nightly talk show. The cancellation, which was first reported by the New York Times, has been confirmed by CNN, though a date has yet to be set for when the former British tabloid editor will end his troubled run. Morgan was hired by Jonathan Klein, the predecessor of Jeff Zucker, who came into the top job at CNN with a mandate to improve ratings....
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
In an effort to improve its last-place prime-time lineup, CNN is canceling Piers Morgan's nightly talk show. The cancellation, which was first reported by the New York Times, has been confirmed by CNN, though a date has yet to be set for when the former British tabloid editor will end his troubled run. Morgan was hired by Jonathan Klein, the predecessor of Jeff Zucker, who came into the top job at CNN with a mandate to improve ratings....
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FEATURES
By Richard Huff and Richard Huff,New York Daily News | February 11, 1994
Daisy Fuentes promises her new talk show for CNBC won't wade into the tabloid waters so favored by traditional talk fare."You will not see transsexuals who have gotten a sex change to become women and are now lesbians," Ms. Fuentes said the other day.Not only doesn't she want to make her viewers uncomfortable, she doesn't intend to make her guests feel that way, either. She just wants to find out "what makes them tick." And controversy isn't likely to be part of the mix."I don't enjoy controversy," she said.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 1, 2014
Anyone in the news business will tell you that a side benefit is the diverse number of people one gets to meet. Jay Leno, who leaves "The Tonight Show" on Feb 6 after a 22-year run (retire is not the right word in his case), is one such person. The circumstances surrounding our first meeting involved a column I wrote 15 years ago in support of his wife's activism on behalf of Afghan women. Jay and Mavis Leno invited my wife and me for a visit. Things progressed from there.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | August 15, 1992
With all the preposterous posturing on the post-Johnny Carson late night talk show landscape, can a satirical series set inside a fictional late-night show be nearly as funny as the real thing?"
FEATURES
By Jean Prescott and Jean Prescott,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 7, 1992
If Dan Miller were a circus artist, he'd be walking the high wire without a net. In fact, the man many will remember as co-host and announcer of the short-lived "Pat Sajak Show" is attempting the TV equivalent of that feat. Today (at 1 p.m.) he became the host of "Miller & Company," a new live talk show to air daily on The Nashville Network.Scary stuff?"Actually, it's fun," Mr. Miller said. "Everything is coming together very quickly, and I'm really enjoying myself."The news business is live," he adds, "so you get the feeling for [it]
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 13, 1994
Los Angeles -- If you think you're plugged in now that you're finally comfortable with Larry King and the electronic town hall meeting, think again.CNN has on tap what it calls the "next-generation town hall meeting" -- the talk show in cyberspace.It's called "TalkBack Live" and it starts Aug. 22 -- airing weekday afternoons at 1 in place of "Sonya Live." The show features anchorwoman Susan Rook, CompuServe and MCI -- not necessarily in that order."You might be wondering why we at CNN felt the need to create a program like this," executive producer Teya Ryan said yesterday in announcing the show.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 28, 1994
For a guy who supposedly doesn't inspire passion, Johnny Oates sure got things fired up on the radio Monday night.Oates' dismissal as Orioles manager was the equivalent of a 3-1 offering down the heart of the plate, and the talk show squawkers wasted no time jumping into the batter's box."It's got baseball back on the front page," said WCBM's Sta"The Fan" Charles. "Since Aug. 11 [the last night games were played], you start talking about baseball and the phones go dead. [Monday night] I didn't even have to prompt anything.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
IN THE Flite Three Studios out on Cold Spring Lane, Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid talked to Cathy Rigby yesterday, taping the interview for a show that's essentially doing the same thing as Rigby's production of "Peter Pan" -- taking it on the road hoping for a shot at the big time.Rigby now knows that after 11 months of playing places like Baltimore's Mechanic Theatre, "Peter Pan" is going to Broadway. But the Reids won't know until sometime next year if "Tim and Daphne" will make television's equivalent -- national syndication.
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | December 10, 1992
They say that the best humor is based in truth.It's a frightening prospect when watching the behind-the-scenes antics of a talk-show host in HBO's hysterical "The Larry Sanders Show." Is the backstage banter of late-night biggies like Dave, Jay and Arsenio really this funny?According to Garry Shandling, it is. And he should know. During his rise to fame as a stand-up comedian, Mr. Shandling has done them all, including serving as a regular guest host of "The Tonight Show." As the writer/producer/star of "The Larry Sanders Show," a sometimes scathing send-up of the talk-show world on- and off-stage, Mr. Shandling insists most of the show comes from real life.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 5, 2013
I like capitalism. Specifically, I like the idea that if I write a better book, have a better idea, build a better mousetrap, I will be rewarded accordingly. A system where everyone gets the same reward regardless of quality or quantity of work is inconsistent with excellence and innovation, as the mediocrity and inefficiency that beset the Soviet Union readily proves. The woman who is successful under capitalism gets to eat steak and lobster whenever she wants. That's never bothered me. What does bother me is the notion that the unsuccessful man who lacks that woman's talent, resources, opportunities or luck should not get to eat at all. There is something obscene in the notion that a person can work full time for a multinational corporation and earn not enough to keep a roof over his head or food on his table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
One of the ways you can judge a talk show's energy and momentum -- or lack of such -- is by the guests. When a show has strong producers and is going well, they have guests who bring energy, edge and insights to the production. The guests help make the production pop. One of the signs of a show going bad is low-rent guests -- folks not much in demand who are easy to book and bring nothing with them to the show. "Crossfire" had two of the latter Thursday with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and former Maryland Gov. Bob Ehrlich.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
At first glance, the Metro Gallery's Saturday night bill seems like an odd pairing: Dope Body - one of Baltimore's noisiest, most abrasive bands in years - and Mykki Blanco, a gender-bending, impressively nimble rapper from New York. But watch some live YouTube clips of each act, and the show makes more sense. Dope Body and Mykki Blanco command attention immediately, and both are capable of consistently winning over new audiences through sheer force and charisma. It doesn't matter that their albums would be categorized at opposite ends of the store.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Chris Hayes, an editor at large of The Nation and host of the talk show bearing his name on MSNBC, was raised in a working-class neighborhood but attended some of the most exclusive schools on the planet. "I grew up in the Bronx," says the affable, 33-year-old anchor of "Up With Chris Hayes. " "My mother was the daughter of an Italian deli owner. But I'm also hugely a product of the meritocracy, and for that reason I have my own affection for it. " Both experiences provided fodder for his much-discussed first book, "Twilight of the Elites: America after Meritocracy.
NEWS
January 2, 2013
Teen-age letter-writer Emma Zyriek's take on the "fiscal cliff" negotiations could not have been more to the point ("On eve of fiscal cliff, Congress acts like squabbling children," Dec. 29). It would be a great thing if this letter could be printed in large, bold type and sent to all the politicians in Washington who think they know what is best for the people who put them there. Maybe we should send our high school students to Washington if we want to get anything accomplished.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
Bryan Nehman, co-host of the "Brian and Bryan Show" on Washington's WMAL radio, has been hired by Baltimore's WBAL to replace Dave Durian during morning drive time. Nehman previously anchored morning news on the politically conservative talk and news station in the nation's capital from 2001 to 2011. He's been at the station 12 years. He started as a street reporter, and "was put in the news anchor chair right after 9/11," Nehman said Thursday. "Bryan is one of the brightest young men that I've met, and he is the guy who's going to lead WBAL into the next 20 years of broadcasting," Dave Hill, program director at the station said.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Longtime Maryland political commentator Frank DeFilippo will launch a weeknight talk show on WBAL-AM (1090) next month, '' after the end of post-season baseball coverage."
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2003
Fox News, the nation's edgiest television news shop, announced yesterday it will entrust its Sunday morning talk show to ABC News' Chris Wallace, an old-fashioned correspondent known for a painstaking approach to journalism. Wallace will begin his new duties in mid-November. "It adds another big horse to our stable," said Brit Hume, anchor and Washington managing editor for Fox News. Wallace, 56, takes over from Tony Snow, who served as host of Fox News Sunday since its creation in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
In 1994, at the age of 26, “Hairspray” sweetheart Ricki Lake had one of the hottest daytime talk shows in the history of television. With a daily audience of 5.8 million viewers after only one year on-air, “Ricki Lake” was second only to “Oprah” among all syndicated talk shows, and she was beating “Oprah” among younger viewers. But today, the 43-year-old performer, who returns to talk TV this month with “The Ricki Lake Show,” looks back and says: If only she had been able to understand what she had and what she might have done with all her clout at the time.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
It might have been back in February when he got under the skin of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie on CBS' "Face the Nation. " Or maybe it was in May when he went toe to toe with former House Speaker Newt Gingrich on NBC's "Meet the Press. " None of the analysts is sure exactly when it happened. But they all agree that sometime in 2012, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley become a staple, if not a star, of Sunday morning public-affairs television. And for all the new media speaking to voters, that forum not only shapes the national debate, it also plays a major role in anointing politicians as national leaders worthy of White House consideration.
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