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By David Zurawik | david.zurawik@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
I f the debate among the jury in the Sheila Dixon trial sounds anything like what's transpiring on Baltimore's talk-radio airwaves, it is no wonder that a verdict hasn't be reached. After weeks of passionate debate, talk-show hosts across the dial report only "deepening" divides and "50-50 splits" among listeners. "As the jury has stayed out longer and longer, the divide that I have been hearing from my callers has only become much more firm," says Clarence Mitchell IV, who is known to his WBAL radio audience as C4. "When this is over … we are going to find it was a direct reflection of what we have been hearing on the radio in recent days - a passionate, intense, complicated and deeply divided conversation."
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NEWS
May 27, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial about the tea party's fortunes helps everyone understand why dinosaur media outlets are circling the drain toward oblivion ( "Weakened tea," May 21). In the view of some, every political issue fits into file folders - Fox News Channel or MSNBC, the Wall Street Journal or the New York Times, the tea party or the GOP establishment. The Sun derides me for filling in on conservative talk radio. But it is not conservative talk radio or Fox News that declared bankruptcy or sees its audience decline year after year.
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NEWS
By Kevin Berger | April 11, 1995
SOME MEDIA watchers see talk radio's rise in popularity as the desire of an alienated populace to come together. They see talk radio as an aural town hall meeting where the lively exchange of ideas sows a fruitful community life.Nothing could be further from the truth. While the desire for social communion is certainly real, talk radio only exploits, and in fact exacerbates, alienation.In plain physical terms, talk radio means an isolated person in a studio talking at an isolated person in an automobile.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Dan Shannahan's recent letter to the editor was sad ( "Mikulski picks the wrong side on Obamacare," Sept. 30). I'm sorry he has apparently suffered in the private sector, but his Schadenfreude at the hardships federal workers might be experiencing is just pathetic. The jealousy and resentment seething from his letter aren't really that surprising, of course, given that they are fostered by talk radio and the tea party, a standard tactic of demagogues who want people to blame others for their situation.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | July 2, 1995
Talk radio is dangerous. Why? Because audiences believe what they hear, and much of it is false.I've been listening to a lot of talk shows since 1992. Lying isn't the problem. I believe these guys just feel the need to have an opinion about everything. The ones I have been listening to are way out of their depths on most - yes, most - topics they take on. They don't know what they don't know.So much of it, most of it taken as a whole, is trashy.Why? In "Inside Talk Radio" (Birch Lane Press.
NEWS
By Ken Willaman | February 5, 1993
ANOTHER player has entered the stage -- talk radio.This relatively new phenomenon has added a dimension to our understanding of current events. Its popularity has grown rapidly (in peak hours there may be 30,000 Baltimore-area listeners) since it began with topics like how to housebreak a puppy.It was always a welcome antidote to Beltway gridlock, but now the car phone may be responsible for talk radio's increased popularity -- at least WBAL's afternoon host Ron Smith thinks so. Upscale car phone owners joining the process have raised the stakes and challenged a broader segment of society.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | January 30, 1995
You probably heard that Ellen Sauerbrey has joined the WBAL talk-radio lineup.What you didn't hear is that WBAL is asking for a new position on the AM radio dial because, well, 1090 is way too close to the center.It's no secret that throughout this great nation -- founded on the principles of life, liberty and the pursuit of lower capital-gains taxes -- talk radio has adopted a strong right-wing slant.But maybe you thought that Baltimore, considered to be a Democratic stronghold, would be different.
NEWS
By RON SMITH | August 21, 2009
Reflecting on my 24 years hosting a radio talk show, I realize once again how timing is everything in life. In 1984, when I worked Saturday nights and as a vacation fill-in, talk radio was pretty primitive. There was no Internet, no cell phones, not even fax machines. The programs we did back then were drastically limited, both in who was likely to call in and in the ways we hosts collected news and opinion pieces to talk about on the air. The callers were stay-at-homes, the proverbial little old ladies in tennis shoes, or, late at night, insomniacs of one sort or another.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 29, 1993
SHANGHAI -- The managers of the Caoxi Vegetable Marke knew that city health officials would never notice if they dumped garbage on the ground. But they hadn't figured on talk radio."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton said yesterday that he fears a rising tide of intense, anti-government suspicion is corroding America's ability to govern itself. And he looked to talk radio, of all places, for help."Part of your birthright as an American is to have a healthy suspicion of the government," Mr. Clinton said. But "we're going through a period now when it is much stronger among certain groups than it has historically been."Many talk shows feed the "anxiety and lashing out" that infects American discourse, Mr. Clinton said.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | October 30, 2011
Cam Cameron emerged from the coaches' lockers looking like something out of GQ, resplendent in a gray sports coat, black shirt, jeans and cowboy boots. The man looked sharp. And he felt sharp, too. You could tell. And why not? A half-hour earlier, the Ravens had pulled out a gutty — and ugly — 30-27 win over the lowly Arizona Cardinals in the chilled air of M&T Bank Stadium. On one hand, it was the greatest comeback in team history. Down 24-6 at halftime, with the offense seemingly in the throes of narcolepsy, Joe Flacco and Anquan Boldin had combined to put on a passing clinic that led to Billy Cundiff's winnng 25-yard field goal as time ran out. On the other hand, it was fair to wonder why the Ravens offense got off to another horrible start, the kind of start that would doom them if they play like that against the Steelers Sunday night at Heinz Field.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2011
After a nationally televised victory, one imagines the Terps spending the next day basking in glory. Not waiting for a call from "What Not to Wear. " But as the University of Maryland football team hit the field for their season opener against the Miami Hurricanes, the blogosphere erupted in what might have been a first for a collegiate sporting event: More catty clothes talk than you'd hear on Seventh Avenue. Football met fashion Monday night - and it wasn't pretty.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | July 8, 2011
Like the NFL players he used to cover for his radio show, Jerry Coleman considers himself to be locked out. Let go by WVIE (1370-AM) last week when the station switched to a news/talk format, Coleman is looking for a new gig in the Baltimore-Washington area and is optimistic he will be covering an NFL team in 2011. “I love covering the Ravens,” Coleman said in a phone interview Thursday. “I want that to continue in some capacity and I have spoken with people about that. I hope to be back there when they're playing again.” In September 2008, WVIE announced that it was switching to a sports talk format as an affiliate of FOX Sports Radio, and the station hired Coleman as its sports director and asked him to host a show, of course.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 10, 2011
Judging by the comments on David Zurawik’s posts about Mark Viviano leaving 105.7 The Fan , sports fans in Baltimore are almost as passionate about the broadcasters who cover their hometown teams as they are about the actual teams themselves. Every Baltimore broadcaster who has been in front of the camera or behind the microphone has had his or her fair share of loyal supporters -- yes, even Anita Marks. It seems as though many of you were fond of Viviano, who left his morning show at The Fan after more than six years because he needed a break from working two jobs (he is still the sports director at WJZ)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 26, 2011
George E. Dail, a retired businessman who was a talk-radio host and newspaper columnist, died Saturday of congestive heart failure at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Aberdeen resident was 80. Mr. Dail, the son of a Ford Motor Co. executive and a homemaker, was born and raised in Norfolk, Va. Mr. Dail dropped out of high school, lied about his age and enlisted in the Army when he was 16 years old. He was stationed in Germany, where he played in an Army band. After being discharged from the Army in the late 1940s, he earned his General Education Development diploma.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2010
It's late on an autumn evening, slate-colored clouds are gliding across the face of a nearly full moon, and in a dimly lit studio about a nautical mile from the South River, a woman who may or may not have traveled through time fingers her lapis lazuli pendant, sits at her microphone and begins to speak very softly. "Our waxing gibbous moon shines over the Chesapeake Bay tonight, and 'Chesapeake Moon' shines on WRYR," she says, her voice as tranquil as a breeze on the waves. "I'm Carol Bennett, inviting you to participate in metaphysical talk radio.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | September 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It may be remembered as the day Tommy and the Bull of WNOR met Al Gore, the day Barbara Carlson of KSTP asked White House spokesman Mark Gearan if he'd like to see her tattoo, the soggy day in September when radio talk show hosts invaded the White House lawn and a new chapter in Bill Clinton's talk show democracy was born.Looking like some 21st-century phone-it-in government (the result of a Rush-Ross ticket?), the White House turned over its front yard yesterday to nearly 60 talkmeisters from around the country who proudly broadcast from rickety wooden tables and folding chairs.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 29, 2009
If the debate among the jury in the Sheila Dixon trial sounds anything like what's transpiring on Baltimore's talk-radio airwaves, it is no wonder that a verdict hasn't be reached. After weeks of passionate debate, talk-show hosts across the dial report only "deepening" divides and "50-50 splits" among listeners. "As the jury has stayed out longer and longer, the divide that I have been hearing from my callers has only become much more firm," says Clarence Mitchell IV, who is known to his WBAL radio audience as C4. "When this is over ... we are going to find it was a direct reflection of what we have been hearing on the radio in recent days - a passionate, intense, complicated and deeply divided conversation."
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