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NEWS
October 17, 2012
As a female doctor from Pakistan, I am disgusted by the assassination attempt against 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani blogger and women's rights activist ("Outspoken teen shot," Oct. 10). In my view, this attack was actually directed at the legacy of the Prophet Muhammad, who declared that "seeking knowledge is obligatory upon every Muslim man and woman. " He added that believers should "seek knowledge even if you have to go to China. " Aisha, the prophet's wife, was a learned woman who imparted knowledge to both men and women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
As expected, we're still in D.C., where Jake and Olivia are full-on doing the couple thing … sort of. While jogging through the park, he mentions that he booked a hotel suite near her apartment for “booty calls,” because...something about standing in the sun. Olivia objects, but Jake points at Cyrus, waiting for her on a park bench nearby, and calls that a “political booty call.” OK. A few things have changed with Cyrus - his doctors...
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NEWS
January 3, 2012
American officials are welcoming a Taliban statement that the Afghan insurgents will set up an office in the Persian Gulf state of Qatar. The move is being seen as a first step toward peace talks aimed at reconciling the Taliban and the Western-backed government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai, something the U.S. has long sought to broker. A serious offer to negotiate would mark not only a departure from the group's previous refusal to engage in talks but also ease concerns over the scheduled withdrawal of U.S. and NATO troops from the country by 2014.
NEWS
September 24, 2014
My heart is very saddened today as I listen and read the media reports related to the radical and terrorist units in the Middle East who are speaking out as they describe various avenues by which they eventually hope to destroy the U.S. units in that area, particularly by the leaders of the ISIS in Iraq and Syria. In my opinion, strong defensive action must be taken at this point if the U.S. is to survive. It is possible that the U.S. could take another pounding similar to the one we received in 9/11, which was planned and executed by terrorists enjoying sanctuary in Afghanistan.
NEWS
May 16, 2012
It is quite obvious that the U.S. and NATO are being outsmarted by the Taliban, who are wearing fake Afghan soldiers' uniforms to kill our soldiers and sow discord among the alliance. Moreover, the restrictions placed on our peace keeping forces prevent them from fighting a more aggressive conflict, which is absolutely a hindrance to our assisting the weak Afghan government and military. Quinton D. Thompson, Towson
NEWS
By Dennis Kux and Karl F. Inderfurth | December 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Afghanistan topped the agenda at the recent NATO summit in Latvia. President Hamid Karzai faces many major challenges: weak governmental institutions, rampant corruption, lagging economic reconstruction, a booming drug trade, too many warlords, and a resurgent Taliban. Over time, with sufficient and sustained international support, and Afghanistan's own efforts, all these difficulties can be addressed - except for the Taliban. The Taliban pose a different type of threat. They can lose every firefight with superior NATO, U.S. and Afghan National Army forces and still turn southern and eastern Afghanistan into a "no development" zone and stir insecurity in Kabul and elsewhere.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Zulfiqar Ali and Mark Magnier and Zulfiqar Ali,Tribune Newspapers | April 25, 2009
After a day of meetings and government threats, a group of Taliban fighters grabbed their guns Friday, jumped into their trucks and headed back toward the Swat Valley. But residents of the Buner district, the object of the Taliban expansionary push, remained badly shaken, well aware of the militants' record in neighboring Swat of burning schools, beheading policemen and beating unmarried couples walking in public or holding hands. "I can't think of going back to Buner," given the security situation, said Afsar Khan, 40, a municipal council member, who fled to Peshawar with his family.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 12, 2008
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan -- Pakistani authorities said yesterday that they had captured a senior Taliban commander, critically wounding him in a shootout after he crossed into Pakistan from southern Afghanistan. Mansoor Dadullah, whose more prominent brother Mullah Dadullah was killed by U.S. forces last year in Afghanistan, was captured after he and a small band of fighters encountered a contingent of Pakistani troops in the southwest province of Baluchistan, the Pakistani army said. Maj. Gen. Athar Abbas said Dadullah was captured alive but was badly wounded in a firefight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2003
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - U.S. forces have begun a large-scale operation in the Shahikot Mountains in southeastern Afghanistan, returning there to flush out rebels from the scene of a two-week battle against the Taliban and al-Qaida last year. Afghan security officials reported last week that Jalaluddin Haqqani, the Taliban's chief of staff, together with several Arab fighters, had returned recently to the area, where they fought U.S. troops last spring. Seven U.S. soldiers died and 11 were wounded after the Taliban brought down two U.S. helicopters on March 4 last year in what was the American military's deadliest day in its war against the Taliban.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Laura King and M. Karim Faiez and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 14, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Taliban movement suffered a significant setback with the death of its top operational commander, Mullah Dadullah, but the brutal tactics he pioneered have likely left a lasting imprint on the insurgency, military officials and analysts said yesterday. Dadullah, one of the most senior Taliban figures to be killed by Western forces in more than five years of fighting, died Saturday in a U.S.-led military operation in Afghanistan's southern Helmand province, said American and Afghan officials.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Dane Egli's commentary decrying the exchange of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five Taliban detainees is wrong on every point ( "Bergdahl swap troubling amid recent violence," July 28). Legally, the Taliban detainees were declared to be "enemy combatants," not terrorists. That means that they are legally prisoners of war. We could not have held them for 10 years without trial otherwise. Similarly, Sgt. Bergdahl was not a "hostage," he was a prisoner of war. He was a soldier captured in a war zone, not a kidnapped civilian, as Mr. Egli asserts.
NEWS
By Dane Egli | July 27, 2014
The violence erupting on the former battlefields of Operation Iraqi Freedom coupled with the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan raises new concerns over the recent exchange of five Taliban commanders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. The swap conflicted with traditional hostage recovery policy and trading of war prisoners and may lead our enemies to conclude that we're now willing to negotiate with kidnappers - potentially endangering lives abroad. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the self-proclaimed Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, was himself an insurgent detainee released by the U.S. in 2009.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | June 9, 2014
There he goes again. At a press conference in Brussels Thursday, President Obama was asked if he was surprised by the controversy over his decision to trade Bowe Bergdahl for five high-ranking Taliban leaders. His response was vintage Barack Obama: "I'm never surprised by controversies that are whipped up in Washington. " Thus establishing from the start that he considers the controversy to be a kind of partisan farce, he proceeded to rebut criticisms virtually no one has made.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons, Michael A. Memoli and David S. Cloud, Tribune Newspapers | June 4, 2014
The release of America's only prisoner of war in Afghanistan in a trade for five senior Taliban commanders from U.S. custody took only minutes Saturday. But it followed 31/2 years of secret on-and-off negotiations that produced far less than the White House had hoped. The idea of swapping prisoners emerged in early 2011, administration and congressional officials said Tuesday, when U.S. officials still sought to convince Taliban political leaders to come to the negotiating table to end the grinding war in Afghanistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Six months in, there is more to say about Al Jazeera America than that its ratings stink. But that's about the only thing I see written about the Qatar-owned cable channel these days. The ratings are minuscule - about one-half the audience that Al Gore's wreck of a channel, Current TV, was drawing before Al Jazeera bought it in 2013 to gain access to American homes. As of last month, Al Jazeera America was averaging about 10,000 viewers at any given time of the day, while CNN had 272,000, MSNBC 349,000 and Fox News 924,000.
NEWS
February 28, 2014
One of the most horrific episodes of the Vietnam war was the plight of those South Vietnamese who were loyal to the United States throughout the war. Known as the "boat people," they desperately, and often fatally, tried to escape Communist retaliation after the fall of Saigon. With the imminent American withdrawal from Afghanistan and the total ineptitude of the central government, it is extremely likely that the Taliban will eventually regain control of the country and will reimpose their strict version of Islam ( "Karzai's blame game," Feb. 2)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
KABUL, Afghanistan --A large springtime offensive by Taliban fighters has turned into the strongest show of force by the insurgents since U.S. forces drove the Taliban from power in late 2001, and Afghan and foreign officials and local villagers blamed a lack of U.S.-led coalition forces on the ground for the resurgence. U.S. forces are handing over operations in southern Afghanistan to a NATO force of mainly Canadian, British and Dutch troops, and militants have taken advantage of the transition to swarm into rural areas.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A Pakistani Taliban leader who is waging a government-backed campaign to evict Central Asian militants from Pakistan's tribal regions said yesterday that he would give Osama bin Laden sanctuary in his area if he sought it. "Bin Laden has never come to this area, but if he comes here and seeks our protection, then according to tribal laws and customs we will protect him," the Taliban commander, Mullah Muhammad Nazir, 32, told journalists...
NEWS
By Craig R. Wonson | February 2, 2014
Two recent incidents in Afghanistan resulted in the deaths of more than 30 civilians. The first was a U.S. airstrike in support of Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) in Parwan Province, the second a Taliban suicide attack on a popular restaurant in Kabul. The circumstances surrounding these two incidents were significantly different. The airstrike was reportedly conducted in-extremis to help save the lives of Afghan and U.S. forces trapped by heavy Taliban fire. In contrast, the Taliban attack on the restaurant was designed to kill as many civilians as possible.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | November 2, 2013
When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative? The Afghan constitution contains language that supposedly protects women's rights, and Afghanistan has signed several international human rights treaties that guarantee protection for women.
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