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Talent Development High School

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Erica L. Green | March 12, 2013
The Baltimore City school board remained deadlocked Tuesday on whether to renew the contract for Baltimore Talent Development High School, run by the Center for Social Organization of Schools at the Johns Hopkins University, extending a decision that was already deferred one month due to an apparent impasse. Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso recommended severing ties with the high-profile organization based on an intensive contract renewal process that scrutinized more than two dozen schools, such as charters, that are run by external operators.
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NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 12, 2013
The Baltimore City school board remained deadlocked Tuesday on whether to renew the contract for Baltimore Talent Development High School, run by the Center for Social Organization of Schools at the Johns Hopkins University, extending a decision that was already deferred one month due to an apparent impasse. Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso recommended severing ties with the high-profile organization based on an intensive contract renewal process that scrutinized more than two dozen schools, such as charters, that are run by external operators.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
Following a two-month impasse, the Baltimore City school board voted Tuesday to extend a one-year contract to the operators of Baltimore Talent Development High School. The school board voted unanimously, with one recusal, to allow the Center for Social Organization of Schools at the Johns Hopkins University to operate the school for one more year, during which the district will monitor its progress. In January, after a months-long review of more than two dozen schools with external operators, city schools CEO Andres Alonso recommended severing ties with the school's operator at the end of the school year and slating the school for closure in 2014.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday to close six schools at the end of the school year but spared two other schools from immediate closure after passionate protests from the community. The schools approved to close at the end of the school year are Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy-East, Baltimore Civitas Middle/High School, Baltimore Talent Development High School, Baltimore Antioch Diploma Plus High School, Baltimore Liberation Diploma Plus High School, and the Friendship Academy of Science and Technology.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
Baltimore's board of school commissioners is scheduled to vote this week on a second round of school closings, an inevitably painful process that has left many individuals and communities upset that their neighborhood schools are being shut down or reconfigured. Despite the pain, in many cases the recommendations that emerged from the system's facility solutions committee reflect the board's general preference for converting traditional middle schools to K-8 schools. But in at least one case involving Harlem Park schools, the board should reconsider and try to come up with another solution.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,sun reporter | February 18, 2007
The Harlem Park school complex includes a preschool designed to give youngsters a leg up on learning, a highly regarded public high school run in partnership with the Johns Hopkins University and programs to keep kids busy after school. Children ages 3 to 17 are thriving, according to Kacy Conley, director of Urban Services for the YMCA of Central Maryland. At least for now, she said. Conley was among community leaders, parents and teachers who testified yesterday that a plan to move another school to the campus threatened progress in Harlem Park.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | November 21, 2013
The first public hearing before the Baltimore City school board about the recommendations to close schools run by external operators spurred heated exchanges between operators and school officials, and left board members questioning the consistency of the district's decisions about which schools should be given second chances. Earlier this month, Interim CEO Tisha Edwards introduced a sweeping plan that called for seven traditional and externally operated schools to close. The contracted schools recommended for closure are: Baltimore Talent Development High School, Baltimore Community High School, Bluford Drew Jemison East and Bluford Drew Jemison West STEM academies, Baltimore Civitas Middle/High School, Baltimore Antioch Diploma Plus High School, and Baltimore Liberation Diploma Plus High School.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | February 12, 2013
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday night to not renew the contracts of several charter and other independently run schools — but deferred making decisions about whether most of them would close. In January, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso recommended closing four independently operated schools and bringing two other schools under district control, after a review of their progress concluded they had failed to live up to their promise. Some had low test scores while others had financial problems.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun reporter | January 31, 2008
One man was shot yesterday afternoon during what police said was a "home-invasion robbery gone very, very bad" in Harlem Park, and police took a gunman into custody after a standoff that lasted more than four hours. About 2:30 p.m., members of the Police Department's organized crime division were patrolling in the 1700 block of Harlem Ave. when they heard shooting coming from a three-story rowhouse. They saw a man who had been shot multiple times and several other people outside the house, said Officer Troy Harris, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
Three reform programs designed at the Johns Hopkins University to turn around low-performing, high-poverty schools yesterday received federal grants of $27.9 million.Much of the funding from the U.S. Department of Education is aimed at "comprehensive reform" -- reforms that change virtually everything schools do.Hopkins got the largest share of $84.6 million to be awarded over five years to national demonstration programs. And it won renewal of a five-year grant to its center for the study of children who are at risk of failure.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa , sam.sessa@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
In today's culture, rebels often get a bad rap. But not all of them deserve the negative connotations that come with the word. A number of people who were once labeled rebels are now considered heroes by mainstream America, according to Cherrie Woods, the director of marketing and public relations at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was once considered a rebel. So was Rosa Parks, she said. "In the '50s and '60s, any African-Americans who were not treated as equals and chose to challenge this system were viewed as rebels," Woods said.
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