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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Takoma Park teen-ager was found guilty yesterday on three counts of automobile manslaughter in an accident last July that killed his best friend, a classmate and a father of three. Michael Schoenfeld, 17, showed no emotion as Montgomery District Judge Eric Johnson announced the verdict. Family members and friends of the victims and Schoenfeld filled every seat, stood shoulder to shoulder and sat cross-legged on the floor of the tiny courtroom. As the judge read his opinion, looks of relief spread across the faces of each victim's family, their shoulders sagged as they exhaled, and then they turned and hugged.
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SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
LAS VEGAS -- At Friday's pre-fight weigh-in, World Boxing Association super lightweight champ Sharmba Mitchell got a "good-luck" hug from welterweight champion Felix Trinidad. The Takoma Park resident's luck held up last night at UNLV's Thomas & Mack Center, as the 29-year-old Mitchell defended his crown for the sixth straight time and got his 15th consecutive victory by unanimous decision over Venezuela's third-ranked contender, Elio "Chingo" Ortiz (18-4, 14 knockouts). Mitchell survived a sixth-round head-butt that produced a laceration over his right eye that is expected to require 30 stitches.
FEATURES
By K Kaufmann and K Kaufmann,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
Residents of Takoma Park tend to bristle when their town is condescendingly labeled a "nuclear-free zone." Yes, they are nuke-free, oppose the war in Iraq and even let non-citizens vote in municipal elections. But they don't see themselves as radical or weird; they are, they say, simply a town with a conscience. So the recent brouhaha over Susan Lindauer, the Takoma Park "peace activist" arrested on suspicion of trying to help Iraqi agents in the United States, has left the locals feeling particularly prickly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Noyes and Andrew Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2003
The eclectic collections of bric-a-brac hocked at Takoma Park's trademark vintage shops have a uniqueness matched only by the burg's mishmash of people, cultures and lifestyles. Here, the pace is slow, and the inhabitants embody a small-town sincerity that soothes the soul like a pat on the back - an atypical atmosphere for a community so close to the hustle and bustle of Washington. In fact, the District line bisects the city, but locals agree that the pride and joy of Takoma Park is on the Maryland side.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
TAKOMA PARK - This is a town where tie-dyed clothing and Birkenstocks never go out of fashion, a place where aging hippies and young vegetarians, potters and folk musicians, peaceniks and women's rights lawyers make their home. Yet even the free-spirited folks in this self-proclaimed "Berkeley of the East" are having a hard time pushing through one of the most popular of liberal causes: a handgun ban. More than 18 months have passed since anti-gun activists went door to door collecting signatures for a referendum to outlaw the possession and sale of handguns in Takoma Park.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
TAKOMA PARK -- Steve Francis grew up in this leafy suburban enclave of high-rise apartments and graceful Victorian homes. He played pickup basketball games in the modern community center and in the cellar of the city's 70-year-old stone firehouse.Now, on the eve of the National Basketball Association draft in which Francis might be taken as the No. 1 pick, Takoma Park residents of all ages say they are rooting for their favorite son -- providing he remembers his roots."I'm proud of him, as long as he's a good role model and makes these kids care about their lives and values," said Rebecca Brown, 57, town librarian.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
TAKOMA PARK - American flags fly alongside homemade signs promoting nonviolence in this quirky, liberal suburb struggling to square its enlightened image with deep-seated hostility toward those who directed the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. Long a hotbed for peace activism, Takoma Park would have seemed a perfect place to find mass objections to the retaliatory airstrikes unleashed by the United States during the past two days against targets inside Afghanistan. Dozens of residents attended a demonstration last month in Washington in which marchers called for a peaceful response to the terrorism in New York and at the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,[SUN REPORTER] | October 29, 2006
LIZ LERMAN IS RUSHING down the hall toward yet another dance rehearsal. Her hair has come loose from its clip -- again -- and escaped strands fly about her head like a swarm of bees. Lerman is a MacArthur Award-winning choreographer, and ideas burst forth from her with such rapidity and vigor they practically create a disturbance in the atmosphere. Squint, and you almost can see the rapid fanning of invisible wings. LIZ LERMAN DANCE EXCHANGE "30TH ANNIVERSARY RETROSPECTIVE" / / Thursday and Friday / / Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center at the University of Maryland, College Park / / 301-405-2787 or claricesmithcenter.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 1998
TAKOMA PARK -- By a mile or so, Liz Lerman Dance Exchange is now a Maryland dance company.Well-known nationally for its diverse complement of dancers and community philosophy, Lerman's longtime Washington-basedtroupe moved a year ago to a former post office in Takoma Park -- about 1,700 yards over the D.C. line.Its concert this weekend at the Dance Place, Washington's busy venue for contemporary dance, continues a long tradition. But the company also is exploring its new state, with projects in local schools and a long-term relationship, beginning next summer, with the Columbia Festival of the Arts.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Robert Little, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2010
Three hospitals have consistently outpaced all others in Maryland in the use of stents to treat heart patients, according to data obtained by The Baltimore Sun, raising questions as state regulators examine whether the expensive procedure is performed unnecessarily by some doctors. St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson became the subject of a state investigation earlier this year after it notified 585 patients that they might have received unneeded stents to prop open their arteries.
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