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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
I love the Entertainment Weekly covers this week that show Kevin Spacey and Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the shoes, shirt, blouse and suits of each other's presidential character. It reminded me how lucky Baltimore is to have these remarkable actors making two of the best series ever on television here in Baltimore in 2014. One of the reasons they are so great is because they are so fearless as actors. Dressing up as each other's presidential TV character (Frank Underwood and Selina Meyer)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
I love the Entertainment Weekly covers this week that show Kevin Spacey and Julia Louis-Dreyfus in the shoes, shirt, blouse and suits of each other's presidential character. It reminded me how lucky Baltimore is to have these remarkable actors making two of the best series ever on television here in Baltimore in 2014. One of the reasons they are so great is because they are so fearless as actors. Dressing up as each other's presidential TV character (Frank Underwood and Selina Meyer)
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | September 21, 1994
King Leatherbury has spurned the inaugural running of the Kentucky Cup with his Grade I winner, Taking Risks, and is starting the horse instead in the Maryland Million Classic.Yesterday, Maryland's No. 1 trainer of winners said he is skipping the $400,000 Kentucky race on Saturday because his horse would have to carry more weight in the race than some of the nation's most proficient runners.Just last week Taking Risks was listed as one of the intended Kentucky Cup starters. But Leatherbury said Taking Risks was being penalized too much for his 7 1/2 -length victory in the Philip H. Iselin Handicap at Monmouth Park on Aug. 21."
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Baltimore administrators kicked off the coming school year Wednesday in an unconventional ceremony during which interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards told them that they would be encouraged to take risks, make mistakes and push the limits of what's possible. The annual event — which traditionally has been the superintendent's platform to deliver a "State of the Schools" address reviewing the previous year and previewing the next year's goals — drew more than 200 school leaders to the American Visionary Art Museum , where there was more dancing and laughter than data and lectures.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
Superlatives flowed from King Leatherbury after 1-5 favorite Taking Risks shaved two seconds off the Laurel track record yesterday en route to a 7 1/4 -length victory in the Maryland Million Classic.After 36 years in the business, with probably more than 20,000 horses passing through his barn, Maryland's winningest trainer described the 4-year-old gelding as the fastest horse he has trained.Better than his 1985 Preakness starter I Am The Game. Better than his double New York stakes winner Thirty Eight Paces.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
Preakness-winning jockey Pat Day made a rare appearance in Maryland yesterday, but lost when Mark Johnston and his mount, Taking Risks, beat him by a nose in the Baltimore Budweiser Breeders' Cup at Laurel Race Course.Day's stretch run on favored Conte Di Savoya came too late after the Kentucky horse initially held up the start for about a half minute and then broke last in the seven-horse field.Day came from 13 lengths back, but couldn't catch Taking Risks, who took the lead in the upper stretch after passing leaders Majesty's Turn and Sunny Sunrise.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
Before the eight-day meet at the Maryland State Fair began, jockey Travis Dunkelberger, 28 and a 10-year veteran, already had the reputation of a winner at the five-eighths-mile track that is known as a bullring because of its tight quarters. Yesterday, on the last day of the meet, he added to his reputation as the track's leading jockey with three wins, including victory in the $50,000 Taking Risks Stakes for Maryland-breds, that secured his fourth or fifth title at Timonium. Dunkelberger wasn't sure which, and track spokesman Rich Paul said no records from previous years were kept.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Come this Valentine's Day, Ahmed Salman Rushdie, who yearns for love, will have dodged death for seven years. Now he is making a very public run for daylight.He speaks with disarming sureness of what drives him: The history of literature teaches us "that we cannot use persecution as an excuse not to do our work."That was far from obvious when, in 1988, Mr. Rushdie was sentenced by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to die for his novel "The Satanic Verses." He spent the next two years in a state of despair and mental chaos.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 29, 1999
Actor David Adkins likes to climb mountains, but theater is a mountain he was once hesitant to scale.Although the former Marylander displayed a gift for acting as a student at McDonogh School, he says that, after he graduated, "I put theater behind me."Now, however, Adkins has been a full-time actor for a decade, and when Oscar Wilde's "An Ideal Husband" opens at Center Stage tonight, he will be making his first professional appearance in his home state.His character, Lord Goring, was the playwright's alter ego in this 1894 political comedy revolving around a politician with an immaculate reputation, Sir Robert Chiltern, whose marriage and career are suddenly threatened by a revelation from his past.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1995
Taking Risks, the $20,000 claimer who rose to become a Grade I stakes winner, returned from a six-month layoff yesterday with a convincing victory in a $25,000 allowance race at Pimlico.Trainer King Leatherbury was "very pleased" after the 5-year-old gelding scored a 1 1/2 -length victory over One Tuff Oop in the six-furlong test, merely a tuneup for the 1994 Maryland-bred champion."I didn't really train him as a sprinter for this, but that's the way he ran," said Leatherbury. "I just wanted a nice, easy race for him. This horse has so much ability."
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2012
As a punt returner, Stefon Diggs rarely signals for fair catches. It seems not to be in his nature for Diggs - Maryland's amped-up electron of a player - to play it safe. The freshman receiver-returner, who often bounds around the field exhorting teammates during timeouts, seems barely able to stand still. Through five games, Diggs' energy and boldness have been among Maryland's chief assets - but also occasionally a liability. Saturday's 19-14 victory over Wake Forest provided a case in point.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer, Tribune newspapers | November 11, 2011
In the NFL, everyone tries to keep up with the Joneses. And for good reason. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones has transformed a franchise that was losing $1 million per month in 1989 into the league's richest team, one valued by Forbes at $1.8 billion. Despite their struggles on the field, the Cowboys are routinely at the top when it comes to number of prime-time games, sponsorship revenue, TV viewership numbers and merchandise sales. In fact, their cheerleaders outsell many NFL teams in merchandise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2011
I don't have time for a full review, but I do want to alert viewers to the premiere tonight on HBO of director Martin Scorsese's "George Harrison: Living in the Material World. " This is one of the most ambitious and daring biographical films that I have ever seen on TV. I am not a big Beatles fan. And of the Beatles, Harrison was my least favorite. But Scorsese helped me understand, appreciate and ultimately care more than I expected to for Harrison and the challenging journey the guitarist chose to make of his life.
NEWS
July 25, 2011
We applaud Gov. Martin O'Malley for his bravery in standing with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Marylanders as he throws his support behind marriage equality ("O'Malley to back same-sex marriage, July 23). In doing so, Governor O'Malley risks the scorn and abandonment of his church, as well as marriage opponents of all stripes throughout Maryland and beyond. Our prayers and gratitude are with him as he stands up for what is right, in the face of potential personal repercussions.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 12, 2011
Let's roll out the list. It includes, in no particular order of sluttishness: Kwame Kilpatrick; Jesse Jackson; James McGreevey; Ted Haggard; Gary Condit; Mark Sanford; John Edwards; Bill Clinton; Newt Gingrich; Rudy Giuliani; Eliot Spitzer; Antonio Villaraigosa; Arnold Schwarzenegger; James West; Larry Craig; David Vitter; John Ensign. And now Anthony Weiner, Democratic representative fromNew York. The thing these individuals have in common is as obvious as, well ... the erect penis in Mr. Weiner's underwear in that risqué picture he claimed he never tweeted to a young woman and wasn't even sure was really him - only to confess last week that he was lying on both counts.
NEWS
By Jeff Hooke | February 21, 2011
The NFL is experiencing a boom time. Super Bowl viewership hit an all time high this year, and fan interest is intense. Financially speaking, the league is doing quite well. Over the last 10 years, the typical franchise has doubled in value — from $500 million to $1 billion — giving the league a total worth of $32 billion. The combination of capital appreciation and cash dividends means the average owner makes perhaps $75 million per year from football. At the same time, player compensation has increased steadily, and the median salary is now $800,000.
BUSINESS
By Kaitlin Gurney and Kaitlin Gurney,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 24, 2002
What's your comfort level with taking financial risk? If you're puzzled about how to honestly respond, you're not alone. Most people find out their comfort level with risk only after the fact - that is, after they've lost money. Then, and only then, do they know how much they can financially and emotionally afford to lose. Tolerance for risk is difficult to accurately gauge because taking risks (at least in the United States) is a socially desirable trait. Ever since our country's founding, entrepreneurial behavior has been highly regarded and amply rewarded.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1995
Maryland-bred champion Taking Risks returns to the races today and is just one of the mounts who figure to keep the 30 percent win streak alive for Pimlico's super-hot jockey, Mark Johnston.Since the meet began April 4, Johnston has won 16 races on 42 mounts and has nearly swept the stakes at Old Hilltop.Johnston scored with Tidal Surge in the opening-day Fire Plug Stakes, won the John B. Campbell Handicap last Saturday with Ameri Valay and kept the added-money streak alive yesterday with a four-length victory aboard Norstep in the Smart Halo Stakes.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
Last year, Preakness partiers deserted the infield in droves. This year, Pimlico wants them back — and isn't afraid to raise a few eyebrows to do it. The Maryland Jockey Club is turning to a controversial marketing campaign built around the phrase "Get Your Preak On." The sexually suggestive slogan has been plastered on billboards and bus stops across the city, and featured on TV and radio stations and online. In one radio commercial, a nerdy young volunteer at a retirement home gushes about getting his "Preak" on with an elderly woman.
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