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Taking Pictures

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NEWS
By Audrey Goldberg and Audrey Goldberg,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2005
Three years ago, Jacob J. Kirk was taking a photography class at Howard Community College. Today, he is taking photographs of the devastation caused by the tsunami in Indonesia. A photographer's mate airman, Kirk, 21, is stationed aboard the USS Abraham Lincoln in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Indonesia, taking pictures and aiding survivors. "This thing completely wiped out a country, no standing buildings ... beach then destruction," Kirk wrote in an e-mail. "Then we go through mountains and valleys, looks a lot like Vietnam.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
A Baltimore-based air marshal was arrested Thursday after allegedly taking cellphone pictures up women's dresses as they boarded a Southwest Airlines flight in Nashville, Tenn., the Transportation Security Administration confirmed Friday. Adam Joseph Bartsch, 28, was arrested by Nashville International Airport police after a witness grabbed his cellphone and alerted a flight attendant, according to a criminal affidavit in the case. He was on duty at the time of the incident and "admitted to taking pictures underneath female's dresses and or skirts" after being advised of his Miranda rights by airport police, the affidavit says.
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NEWS
October 26, 2005
Sixteen Annapolis High School students took part in a four-day documentary photography workshop. Their assignment was to tell the story of Annapolis. After taking pictures with digital cameras, the students picked 48 photos out of about 10,000. They will be exhibited on New Year's Eve at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. More photos are on page 3G.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Visit the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County on any cloudless afternoon, and you're likely to happen on an intriguing sight: a slender fellow bent over a contraption that looks like a cross between an 1890s camera and a bulky steamer trunk. That would be Sanjit Karmakar, a post-doctoral physics fellow who's using his "magic box" to take pictures by following the sun across the sky. One day, the pictures will be of objects thousands of miles away. In a deeper sense, he is trying to help answer a question that still engages scientists: What is the nature of light?
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | February 8, 1998
The restaurant at the Main Press Center appeared crowded, with a number of Olympic workers gathered near the entrance, chatting excitedly.Was there a wait, two U.S. reporters asked?Two young Japanese women smiled and pointed to a corner table."Musashimaru," they said, almost giggling.There he was, all right, all 440 pounds of him. The Hawaiian-born sumo wrestler was preparing for his afternoon feeding. One by one, the young women approached, taking pictures, getting autographs, giggling.What a life.
TRAVEL
July 22, 2007
My son and I traveled in May to Yellowstone National Park for a male bonding trip before he leaves to join the Marines in August. We took this picture in the Lamar Valley near Slough Creek. There was a herd of bighorn sheep that crossed the road in front of us, and this was a great shot of the patriarch. We spent six days searching for and taking pictures of wildlife. We will never forget this trip and will have memories to share for a lifetime. Reed Correll, Bel Air The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for "My Best Shot."
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
An elderly woman hangs from a clothesline tied to the rafters of her attic. A prostitute lies crumpled in her bedroom closet, stabbed to death. A cheating husband, shot through the chest, is sprawled on the floor of the mountain cabin where he had gone to meet his lover. Gruesome scenarios for dollhouses, maybe. But then Frances Glessner Lee was no Barbie. To the contrary, she was a heavyset, dour-looking, middle-aged Chicago heiress - fascinated with forensics and certifiably obsessive when it came to the intricate miniature death scenes she constructed.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2004
Tom Scilipoti was in grade school at St. Leo's in Little Italy when his father bought him an Ansco camera and he took his first pictures. "The school would go on field trips to Washington and what have you," he says. "And I had the camera and I would snap some shots. I liked the idea of getting the photos developed and everybody was anxious to see what you got." He liked the attention and that tension between the shot and the print. He still does. He's 73 now and he's still taking pictures.
FEATURES
By Kay Gardella and Kay Gardella,New York Daily News | April 12, 1991
There used to be an old saw in television that you couldn't do a successful series about newspapermen because they're observers, not participants in stories. But producer Stephen J. Cannell proves this to be wrong Sunday night on NBC with "The Great Pretender" (9 p.m., Channel 2).In the fast-paced two-hour drama, which has the makings of a good series, Bruce Greenwood ("St. Elsewhere") plays Earl Brattigan, a columnist reinstated at his newspaper after a three-year suspension. A judge has ruled that his publisher, Owen Milner (Donald Moffat)
NEWS
June 3, 1993
l More than 150 years after Louis Daguerre snapped the world's first photograph, the power of camera and lens remains a minor miracle. Daguerre's initial effort -- a blurry view of his courtyard -- was extraordinary only for being so ordinary. Yet photography's unique ability to transform quotidian facts into objects of mystery is stunningly apparent in "Baltimore Portrait," an exhibition at City Hall through July 23.Photographers J. Brough Schamp and Tom Guidera III have been documenting Baltimore's passing parade since 1990 with a vintage 1940s press camera set up on a gleaming silver tripod in front of a plain, white backdrop.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2011
Two photographers who were detained by Maryland Transit Administration police this year and told they were forbidden to take pictures of MTA facilities expressed relief Wednesday after the head of the agency flatly repudiated the officers' actions. Administrator Ralign T. Wells disavowed police efforts to restrict photography on or around MTA property and said he would take action to head off a threatened lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland before it can be filed.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Christopher Fussell likes to take pictures of trains and buses. The 29-year-old Oregonian has shot photos and video of transit systems all over the United States. It wasn't until he came to Baltimore, he said Tuesday, that he was detained for committing photography. The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland put the Maryland Transit Administration on notice Tuesday that it intends to file suit over the conduct of transit police in ordering Fussell and another photographer to stop taking pictures.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Scrolling through shelter animals online can be a grim affair. Out of focus, nervous and shadowed dogs. Dimly lit cats that often look scared and awkward. Worse yet, often there's no picture at all — just a place holder and the sad phrase, "Photo not available." But not at the Baltimore Humane Society. There, nearly every cat, dog, bunny and gerbil is captured in sunny light, looking happy, healthy and beckoning, thanks to the work of one volunteer who happens to be a professional photographer.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 28, 2008
Though he photographed a naked teenage student after school last year, former teacher Alan Meade Beier did not sexually exploit the youth, the defendant's lawyer argued yesterday in Howard County Circuit Court. "The appropriate legal standard is that there has to be proof, beyond a reasonable doubt, that whatever act the defendant committed was done for a sexual benefit," the lawyer, Joshua M. Treem, said during closing arguments of Beier's trial on sex abuse charges. "As inappropriate, as alarming, as disconcerting as the conduct that Mr. Beier may have engaged in, it doesn't rise to the level that the statute prohibits," Treem said.
TRAVEL
July 22, 2007
My son and I traveled in May to Yellowstone National Park for a male bonding trip before he leaves to join the Marines in August. We took this picture in the Lamar Valley near Slough Creek. There was a herd of bighorn sheep that crossed the road in front of us, and this was a great shot of the patriarch. We spent six days searching for and taking pictures of wildlife. We will never forget this trip and will have memories to share for a lifetime. Reed Correll, Bel Air The Sun welcomes readers' submissions for "My Best Shot."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | July 31, 2006
Since this is the height of vacation season and everyone's walking around with a camera and snapping pictures, it's a good time to address something that's ticked me off for years. And that is: People who don't say "1 ... 2 ... 3" before they take your picture. In other words, people who snap your picture without any kind of cue or heads-up. What is the deal with these people? Here we have a long, proud history in this country of not actually snapping a picture until you say "1 ... 2 ... 3."
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
It was back-to-school shopping season at the Annapolis Mall. Two young women in short skirts browsed outfits at the Rave store, oblivious to the guy following them from rack to rack. They were also oblivious to the briefcase he'd positioned at their feet, and the little camera peeking from its top. When another woman at the store realized what was happening, she let loose a blood-curdling scream. The man, who turned out to be a suburban father in his 40s, was taking pictures up the girls' skirts, according to authorities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2002
NEW YORK - Since late May, three 35-millimeter movie cameras have been trained on Ground Zero from atop nearby buildings, each programmed to take a picture of the vast site every five minutes, night and day. By Sept. 11, they will be joined by three other cameras rigged to do the same. They will keep taking pictures - 288 a day - for at least the next seven years. The planned result is an extraordinary historical record of the rebirth of the World Trade Center site, one that the effort's sponsors hope will be displayed continuously at a museum, perhaps one that emerges on the site.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II and THOMAS H. MAUGH II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 11, 2006
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter safely entered orbit around the red planet yesterday afternoon for a planned two-year mission to monitor Martian weather, look for signs of life and find potential landing sites for future manned missions. The successful orbital insertion followed a seven-month, 310-million-mile flight from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it was launched Aug. 12. It will be six more months before the craft settles into its final polar orbit and begins snapping high-resolution images of the planet's surface.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
It was back-to-school shopping season at the Annapolis Mall. Two young women in short skirts browsed outfits at the Rave store, oblivious to the guy following them from rack to rack. They were also oblivious to the briefcase he'd positioned at their feet, and the little camera peeking from its top. When another woman at the store realized what was happening, she let loose a blood-curdling scream. The man, who turned out to be a suburban father in his 40s, was taking pictures up the girls' skirts, according to authorities.
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