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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 21, 2006
Can you really steal from a drug dealer?" I put the question to my son, Ray, as I drove him home Sunday. We were returning from what has become our annual ritual of attending the African-American Heritage Festival. We walked around Camden Yards, took in the sights and looked to buy some books and T-shirts. There were slim pickings as far as book offerings went this year, but Ray, with his unabating love for law enforcement folks, found a T-shirt to his liking. "Watch Out for the Alphabet Boys," the front of the T-shirt read.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2013
Two men robbed a Glen Burnie pharmacy at gunpoint Saturday, Anne Arundel County police said. Shortly after 9 a.m., two men wearing black clothing, masks, sunglasses and gloves entered Arundel Pharmacy in the 7500 block Ritchie Highway, police said. One suspect displayed a handgun, and both jumped over a store counter, where they took an undisclosed quantity of prescription medications, according to police. They fled the premises in a small, silver car, possibly a Hyundai. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 410-222-3566.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After a cross-country train trip and a weekend family gathering here, 15-year-old James Acton will pursue tomorrow his own civics lesson, with the Supreme Court as his teacher.He will be in the audience as the justices hold a hearing on his case and its central issue: the constitutionality of compulsory drug testing at school. James was told, as a 12-year-old seventh-grader in Oregon, that he, along with others, had to submit to a urine test even though no one suspected him of using drugs.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A corrections officer pleaded guilty Monday in federal court to smuggling drugs into the Baltimore City Detention Center for members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Adrena Rice, 25, could be sentenced to a maximum of 20 years for "frequently" bringing drugs into the detention center on the behalf of Tavon White, prosecutors said in court. Authorities identified White as a top-ranking Black Guerrilla Family member at the jail who worked with correctional officers to get drugs and cellphones into the jails.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | June 23, 1995
San Francisco Giants hitting coach Bobby Bonds and manager Dusty Baker criticized Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tom Lasorda for saying he was surprised that the New York Yankees would sign anybody who was suspended for taking drugs -- Darryl Strawberry, for instance."
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
ATLANTA -- Ireland's Michelle Smith has been under an international microscope since she arrived at the XXVI Olympiad. Her age and her incredible improvement over the past couple of years have left her under an umbrella of steroid-related suspicion, and a recent International Olympic Committee ruling that stretched the entry requirements for one of her events only added to the cloud of controversy.Through it all, she has made herself the winningest athlete so far of the 1996 Atlanta Games, shaking off a slight shoulder injury to win last night's 200-meter individual medley and her third gold medal.
SPORTS
December 5, 1990
Doping nasal spray alleged in E. GermanyExperts in former East Germany developed a doping nasal spray before the 1988 Olympics that was virtually undetectable, a leading swimmer alleged yesterday.Raik Hannemann, who on Monday admitted taking performance-enhancing drugs, said the spray had the same effect as anabolic steroids and traces of its use would disappear after three days.Hannemann and other athletes yesterday accused former East German sports chiefs of developing a perfect, systematic doping program and of offering hard currency as an incentive for taking drugs.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Key Maryland lawmakers are hoping to require drug tests for welfare applicants and to withhold benefits from those who continue to abuse drugs after entering a treatment program.Members of the legislature's Joint Committee on Welfare Reform said yesterday that they will push a bill in the coming session of the General Assembly to require the tests -- an effort to ensure that money from the welfare program is used to benefit children and not to buy drugs.If it becomes law, the Maryland program will be one of the most far-reaching attempts to prevent taxpayer money from being used to support a drug habit.
SPORTS
October 21, 1991
Drugs and track and moneyDrug abuse is still rife in track and field despite attempts to crack down, world mile record-holder Steve Cram of Britain says."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
A Severn man pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday for shooting an acquaintance during a drug dispute in Pioneer City.Dexter Tyrone Brown, 18, of the 1800 block of Arwell Court could be given up to 30 years in prison when he is sentenced March 13 by Judge Pamela L. North.Brown shot Delarno Darden, 22, of Seat Pleasant in the back of the neck about 1: 45 a.m. June 6.The dispute began when Brown approached Darden, who asked Brown if he wanted to buy drugs.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
A Parkville High School senior donned a thick pair of what police call "drunk glasses. " As her classmates watched, she reeled, nearly stumbled and only missed hitting a pole because she had her hands outstretched. "It was crazy!" said Laura DeGuzman. "I couldn't see or focus. I couldn't tell where objects were. " The glasses, which simulate what it feels like to be legally drunk, were among the many props that Michael Gimbel, a substance abuse counselor, includes in his anti-drug presentations.
NEWS
By Gil Kerlikowske | July 1, 2010
It is time to confront a troubling, dangerous phenomenon on our nation's roads and highways: people driving after taking drugs. One out of eight vehicles on the road on any given weekend night is being driven by an individual with illegal drugs in his or her system. This statistic, from the National Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers, highlights the pervasiveness of drugged driving. The 2007 Roadside Survey is the first time that a test for drugged driving was included in this extensive survey of drivers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | November 16, 2006
It has now become virtually impossible to take any medication in this country and not be terrified by the "possible side effects" warnings. I realized this the other day after coming across a magazine ad for Crestor, the popular cholesterol drug. Under "Important Safety Information," there was this cheery sentence: "Unexplained muscle pain and weakness could be a sign of a rare but serious side effect." Well, that didn't sound so good. It sounded to me as if the Crestor people were saying: OK, you might get your cholesterol under control with this stuff.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 21, 2006
Can you really steal from a drug dealer?" I put the question to my son, Ray, as I drove him home Sunday. We were returning from what has become our annual ritual of attending the African-American Heritage Festival. We walked around Camden Yards, took in the sights and looked to buy some books and T-shirts. There were slim pickings as far as book offerings went this year, but Ray, with his unabating love for law enforcement folks, found a T-shirt to his liking. "Watch Out for the Alphabet Boys," the front of the T-shirt read.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
Time's almost up. The May 15 deadline for signing up for a Medicare prescription drug plan is looming. And if you qualify for Medicare and ignore this special one-time deadline, Uncle Sam plans to slap you with a penalty. So if you have hesitated because you are confused, get help and take action. If you are buying drugs from Canada, make sure you think about what you will do if the government cuts off your source of medication. If you think you have drug coverage through existing insurance, don't guess - make sure.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and David Kohn and Julie Bell and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Pfizer takes drug Bextra off marketAs Pfizer Inc. removed the painkiller Bextra from the market yesterday under pressure from the FDA, the government said almost all of the nation's popular anti-inflammatory drugs carry potential risks of heart attack and stroke when used in high doses over long periods. In a sweeping public health advisory, the Food and Drug Administration said it wants manufacturers to include stronger warnings on the packaging of painkillers ranging from staples such as ibuprofen and naproxen to newer drugs such as Celebrex.
BUSINESS
By GAIL MARKSJARVIS and GAIL MARKSJARVIS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2006
Time's almost up. The May 15 deadline for signing up for a Medicare prescription drug plan is looming. And if you qualify for Medicare and ignore this special one-time deadline, Uncle Sam plans to slap you with a penalty. So if you have hesitated because you are confused, get help and take action. If you are buying drugs from Canada, make sure you think about what you will do if the government cuts off your source of medication. If you think you have drug coverage through existing insurance, don't guess - make sure.
SPORTS
December 24, 1990
White Sox send 2 to Expos for RainesTim Raines was traded from the Montreal Expos to the Chicago White Sox for outfielder Ivan Calderon and Barry Jones, The Associated Press learned.The deal, which had been discussed since the winter meetings earlier this month, was completed when Raines agreed to a three-year contract worth more than $10 million.Sources in both California and Chicago confirmed the trade, which is scheduled to be announced today.As part of the deal, Chicago will get Jeff Carter, a minor-league pitcher, and another minor-league player to be determined.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | January 9, 2005
I go to the pain center at our local hospital, and a few times a year we are given a urine test. Last week my urine test came out positive for morphine, and since I don't take morphine, I was wondering what could cause this result. I have a lemon poppy-seed muffin and a cup of coffee for breakfast, a cheese sandwich for lunch with fruit and a normal dinner. I don't take illegal drugs! Your poppy-seed muffin is the most likely culprit. Sensitive drug tests can pick up traces of opium in the poppy seeds, even though you can't get high on a muffin or bagel.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | July 25, 2004
On the day after new recommendations on cholesterol levels made front-page news, a few fitness buffs were working out at the Downtown Athletic Club on their lunch hour. An informal sampling showed that they knew a lot about exercise and a healthy diet, but were a little shakier when it came to their blood-cholesterol levels. Harry Altscher, 57, a lawyer who lives in Ellicott City, stopped for a minute to towel off the sweat and admit that he didn't know what his LDL, or harmful cholesterol, is. This is the figure that some researchers now believe can't be too low for a healthy heart.
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