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By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Second-grader Rachel Whitaker's short story about her friend getting lost and later found was inspired by both an African proverb and author Jane Cowen-Fletcher's second children's book, "It Takes A Village.""I like the book. It does take a village to raise a child," Rachel said as though she were older than just her seven years.Rachel met the Maine-based storyteller when Mrs. Cowen-Fletcher visited Phelps Luck Elementary School last week to read to the students, talk to them about writing books and critique their short stories.
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NEWS
March 22, 2014
How do you change a culture of chronic absenteeism in Baltimore City? It's like eating an elephant; you have to take one bite at a time ("City principals face discipline for student absenteeism," March 16). After coordinating an attendance initiative in Baltimore City and working to help urban school districts improve school attendance, there are a few things I know for sure. It takes collaboration to educate parents, students and school staff on attendance policy and procedure. It takes resources to remove barriers to attendance and it takes consistency to hold all parties accountable in making sure children attend school on a daily basis.
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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 28, 1996
CHICAGO -- With supreme self-possession, an air of quiet defiance and a touch of humor, Hillary Rodham Clinton took on her critics last night, defending her belief that "it takes a village" to raise a child, and rocking the convention hall.As Mrs. Clinton stepped up to the podium here in her hometown, the convention hall exploded in a thunderous ovation -- with the crowd waving "Welcome Home Hillary" signs, chanting and stomping their feet -- that lasted almost five minutes."I'm overwhelmed by your warm welcome," she said.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
I have been a resident of Columbia since 1976 and always enjoyed the area. I currently reside in Long Reach (since 1991). It was always taken care as all the other villages. I have noticed a steady decline in the upkeep. Trash is strewn everywhere, sidewalks are broken and fallen trees are left to their demise. It is difficult to walk without running into low-hanging tree branches or poison ivy hovering over head. It is really sad to see the area look so downtrodden. It would be nice if some of the Columbia Association funds that we pay could go to take care of some of these issues.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | August 29, 1998
In Rehoboth this summer, it's not any one "thing." It's a fusion of things that makes for a scorching beach look. Today's beach boy or babe is a playful amalgam of hippie, biker, rapper, surfer, jock and South Park.Here, all trends merge, cross-pollinate, morph.It's Rehoboth, the self-professed "family town," via "We Are the World." It takes a village. It takes a Village People. It's the Grateful Dead by way of Puff Daddy. Brian Wilson crossed with an aging Harley road gang.Tie-dye, provocatively placed tattoos (permanent or temporary)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Hula dancers and mariachi musicians battled the cold. Marching band majorettes and pom-pom squads bubbled with excitement. Eskimo dancers and polka all-stars jumped and twisted on the blacktop. Drum corps members and honor guards thrust one foot smartly in front of the other, while Clydesdales and a Democratic donkey did the same with their hoofs.So went the 53rd inaugural parade yesterday, featuring 117 groups representing all 50 states in a procession down Pennsylvania Avenue, from Capitol Hill to the White House.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1996
Hillary Rodham Clinton will be the star attraction tonight at a Baltimore fund-raiser aimed at maximizing voter turnout among women, perhaps the most heavily targeted segment of the electorate this year.Maryland members of The Women's Leadership Forum, an affiliate of the Democratic National Committee, are sponsoring a reception and dinner at the Hyatt Regency hotel on Light Street. Tickets are $200, and $1,000 to attend a VIP reception preceding the dinner.About 500 of the 600 to 700 guests are expected to be women.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
They call it "the book."Every police cruiser assigned to the Baltimore County neighborhood of Hillendale carries a copy of the white three-ring binder that identifies offenders on probation who live in the community. It's an innovation that has helped make Hillendale one of the state's most successful "HotSpots" communities.In its first 18 months, the program that pairs police and probation officers and enlists community support has helped to lower crime 20 percent statewide in targeted areas.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Hillary Rodham Clinton returns to her hometown of Chicago for the Democratic National Convention this weekend by every available index the most controversial, unpopular first lady in modern U.S. history. No one in the White House argues that is a good thing. But as it turns out, they have come to think that it may not be such a bad thing, either.Four years ago Mrs. Clinton, as a loyal wife and partner, was her husband's sword, slicing away at criticisms of his character. Slowly but surely over the course of his term, she has become something else: the president's shield, absorbing attacks on both of them, and freeing Mr. Clinton to seem more popular -- and more moderate -- by comparison.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 5, 1996
THE SURPRISE IN the Federal Election Commission (FEC) lawsuit against the Christian Coalition for allegedly crossing the line dividing voter education from political partisanship is not the suit itself, but that it has taken so long.Since religious conservatives became active in politics in the late 1970s, many liberal coalitions have been trying to intimidate them and invalidate their full participation in the political process.The FEC objects to the "scorecards" the Christian coalition distributes, saying they "express advocacy" for certain candidates and should be reported as "in kind" contributions to those candidates or as independent expenditures.
EXPLORE
September 13, 2012
Bullying is in the news a lot lately, and for good reason. Being bullied can be a searing, scarring experience, and in some ways, it might be a bigger problem than it ever was. In adulthood, we often push aside the memories of being bullied, try to forget it ever happened. But for those who've gone through it - and there are many - the dread, shame and even panic at being the butt of childhood bullying can last a lifetime. We live in an age when consciousness has been raised about the humiliation one youngster can inflict on another.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | October 7, 2007
I PULLED INTO WHITE River Junction in July anticipating a born-again Vermont town crackling with artistic energy and a glam organic vibe. Instead, I found a tidy, nearly deserted village and nary a hint of cool. So much for Internet intelligence -- or so I thought. White River Junction's facade served as an ideal ruse for this unsuspecting traveler. I quickly discovered that the village exults in its persona as an arts hub masquerading as a sleepy way station to elsewhere. That anyone would stumble into town expecting instant coolness only escalates the amusement of residents such as Kim Souza, who abides by the village's unofficial motto: "Make your own fun."
FEATURES
By MARY MCNAMARA and MARY MCNAMARA,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- The host gets the photo shoot, the nominees get the luncheon and the winners, of course, get the Oscars. But the people who make the Academy Awards telecast possible get the cool Oscar gear - sweat shirts and hats emblazoned with the show's number and famous logo. That and all the assorted "truck food" they can eat. The Academy Awards show is consistently the largest entertainment-driven live broadcast in the world, and it takes roughly 1,000 people to make it happen. At this year's production meeting, there were more than 200 in the room, representing the disparate areas of expertise the show requires, from the medical staff to the stage manager, from the set designer to the telephone technician, the limousine coordinator to the director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 29, 2005
It may have started out as a cartoon, but it's coming in on giant cats' paws and not with a whimper, but a roar. When The Lion King begins its 14-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Thursday, it will launch the longest engagement of any touring show in Baltimore history. And though we've been inundated over the years with Lion King books, CDs, stuffed animals, T-shirts, watches, snow globes and baseball caps, there's still plenty of magic in the show's mid-Atlantic premiere. Adapted from Disney's 1994 animated film, the Tony Award-winning musical tells the story of Simba, the cub who flees the kingdom of the Pridelands after his father's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
About a decade ago, next-door neighbors Dan Brewer and Sharon Burke decided that something had to be done about the house across the street. So they left their Hampden rowhomes with strings of lights and staple guns in their hands. A dark 34th Street address that had recently been sold stood as their target. With holiday cheer on their minds, the duo worked feverishly, wrestling with wires and wrapping the porch and ledges with hundreds of tiny, colorful lights. And before the new homeowners could arrange their furniture and unpack boxes, the quick-moving pair had decked their neighbor's new home with an abundance of holiday adornments.
NEWS
By Bill Thomas | January 4, 2001
EVEN SOME of her most faithful media supporters are now wondering if Hillary Rodham Clinton may have gotten a little too greedy when she accepted an $8 million advance to write her White House memoirs. The New York Times, which endorsed Mrs. Clinton's successful Senate bid, called her book deal "an affront to common sense." "You don't have to be a hypocritical Clinton-hater to be concerned," admitted Joe Conason, a columnist for the New York Observer, who's defended the soon-to-be ex-first lady regularly for eight years.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 28, 1996
CHICAGO -- Hometown girl Hillary Rodham Clinton received a hero's welcome at the Democratic convention on a day when the president's campaign highlighted themes of family and education.Mrs. Clinton, who has been a target of Republican attacks, was introduced to the convention crowd last night by Tipper Gore, the vice president's wife.She defended the first lady as "a woman who always maintains her grace, dignity and humor, even while being subjected to unimaginable incivility."As Mrs. Clinton stepped onstage, the convention floor erupted in a thunderous roar and a sea of waving signs reading "Welcome Home Hillary."
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1999
They call it "the book."Every police cruiser assigned to the Baltimore County neighborhood of Hillendale carries a copy of the white three-ring binder that identifies offenders on probation who live in the community. It's an innovation that has helped make Hillendale one of the state's most successful "HotSpots" communities.In its first 18 months, the program that pairs police and probation officers and enlists community support has helped to lower crime 20 percent statewide in targeted areas.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | August 29, 1998
In Rehoboth this summer, it's not any one "thing." It's a fusion of things that makes for a scorching beach look. Today's beach boy or babe is a playful amalgam of hippie, biker, rapper, surfer, jock and South Park.Here, all trends merge, cross-pollinate, morph.It's Rehoboth, the self-professed "family town," via "We Are the World." It takes a village. It takes a Village People. It's the Grateful Dead by way of Puff Daddy. Brian Wilson crossed with an aging Harley road gang.Tie-dye, provocatively placed tattoos (permanent or temporary)
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