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SPORTS
By Bill Finley and Bill Finley,New York Daily News | January 18, 1995
The premise is simple: lower the price of your product and people will buy more of it. Only most racetracks don't get it. Takeout levels at most tracks are outrageously high, the game is dying, and few tracks seem to want to take any steps to make the needed changes.But there is a beacon of light. For the second straight year, Gulfstream Park has lowered its takeout levels and track president Doug Donn wants to change the rules so he can make severe cuts in the upcoming years. So far, so good.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
Abdu Muhammad, who owns Pearl's Caribbean Cafe on Laurens Street in Upton, is known for his curry chicken. Now he is known for his garden, too. When Muhammad, a native of Guyana, South America, proposed to Baltimore officials that he "adopt" the enormous, trash-strewn vacant lot beside his cafe and make it a vegetable garden, they asked him to come to their offices. He thinks they wanted to know if he was for real. "I am a businessman in this community," said the shy cook who has operated the takeout restaurant for two years.
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SPORTS
By New York Daily News | March 14, 1995
The beleaguered and broke horseplayers of New York -- at least the handful left -- are about to take another big hit. The Daily News has learned NYRA and groups representing local breeders and horsemen are backing a bill that would effectively raise the takeout at tracks.Once Gov. Pataki attaches his signature, New York horseplayers will be out about $17 million annually.OTB still is holding out, but only because it wants additional out-of-state simulcasting and other sweeteners added to the package before it comes on board.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 18, 2010
Crazy John hasn't owned Crazy John's in at least a dozen years. But the takeout still bears that signature name and red awning, snuggled on The Block between the oversized red lips logo over the doors to Club Lust and the more pedestrian Arcade Liquors store. Boasting everything from Chicken Alfredo (Wednesday's special) to pepperoni pizza spinning on a wheel in the window, the place still attracts a crowd of sundry visitors. And it still attracts the attention of miscreants and the police, as it did earlier this week, recalling the days when the strip was filled with nefarious characters, such as the original Crazy John, who lives on today, plastered on FBI wanted posters.
SPORTS
By Bill Finley and Bill Finley,New York Daily News | February 26, 1993
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- It is hard to imagine that anything could spoil Hialeah, perhaps the most magnificent racetrack man and nature have ever combined to create. If a racetrack can be a sanctuary, this is it, a place whose beauty is so overwhelming that it makes it easy to forget all the troubles of a losing day.Only this year will be different. Hialeah owner John Brunetti will do the unimaginable; he will make Hialeah the worst place on earth to play horses.Hialeah opens April 1, April Fools' Day for South Florida bettors.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | September 29, 1991
n the '80s, we traded soggy Chinese carryout and greasy barbecued ribs for take-home roasted leg of lamb encrusted with pesto and pasta salad with sun-dried tomatoes and artichoke hearts.Now, in the '90s, gourmet takeout can be almost anything we want it it be -- from top-quality versions of simple fare like meatloaf and bread pudding to low-fat, low-calorie meals prepared with diet as well as taste in mind.These days it's easier than ever before to get the same quality prepared foods at home that we have learned to expect from our restaurant mania of the past decade.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | January 7, 1998
Item: Chung's Egg RollsServings per package: 4Cost: $3.29Preparation time: 10 minutes in conventional oven, 1 minute in microwave oven, or 3 minutes in deep fryer.Review: Is it possible to find a crispy, lightly seasoned egg roll brimming with crunchy vegetables at the supermarket? Maybe, but this refrigerated version doesn't qualify. There's way too much garlic and onion here; I was overpowered the instant I opened a package. Even worse, I couldn't taste a difference in the vegetable- or shrimp-flavored varieties.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 31, 1998
For years, I boycotted New Year's Eve. Instead, I'd stay in, order Chinese takeout and watch the ball drop in Times Square. If I felt particularly decadent, I'd eat my food directly from the paper cartons.If you haven't made plans for tonight, you might consider doing the same thing. Think of the advantages. You won't have to worry about reservations, dressing up or splurging on an overpriced wine.I went back through the year in Eats to find the best places to visit for a New Year's feast to go. After putting the champagne on ice, all you have to do is call in your order early enough.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2000
Despite dire predictions about the Maryland Jockey Club's recent hike in takeout rates, bettors have not deserted Laurel Park races in droves for races at out-of-state tracks. Jim Mango, chief operations officer of the MJC, said that betting patterns apparently have not changed since the takeout increase took effect July 1. Averaging about 1.5 percent, the increase applied only to races at Laurel and next spring at Pimlico. The additional takeout - the money withheld from each wager - will help fund track improvements.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
The world's toughest game is about to get tougher. Betting on thoroughbred racing becomes more expensive today for fans in Maryland. With the blessing of the governor and General Assembly, the Maryland Jockey Club has raised the takeout - the money withheld from every wager. The takeout on races at Laurel Park - and next spring at Pimlico - rises from 17 percent to 18 percent on win, place and show bets; from 19 percent to 21 percent on exactas and daily doubles; and from 25 percent to 25.75 percent on trifectas and superfectas.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,Kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | July 2, 2009
When soccer clubs Chelsea and AC Milan come to Baltimore this month as part of the World Football Challenge, they'll be playing soccer inside M&T Bank Stadium on the best pitch that money can buy. The Ravens just have to ship the natural grass in from Virginia and install it before the two teams arrive. Even though the synthetic turf inside M&T Bank Stadium is considered to be among the best in the NFL, soccer at the highest level is almost always played on natural grass. So as part of the agreement to host the game, the Ravens have arranged to install temporary sod on top of their own turf for the July 24 game.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy Newspapers | May 20, 2009
Make this pizza - it's faster than sending out and easy on the pocketbook. Anything goes on pizza these days. Use this pizza or use whatever you have on hand to create your own. You can find thin crust pizza bases in the market, or try a pita bread base or left over crusty country-style bread. Pizza with red and green bell peppers is a wonderful vegetarian dish. Or, substitute goat cheese and sun-dried tomatoes for a more California version. Crushed red pepper flakes give extra zing to the pizza.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | April 30, 2009
The Artful Gourmet Bistro 9433 Common Brook Road, Owings Mills, 410-356-0363. Open 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday, noon-10:30 p.m. Saturday, 4 p.m.-9 p.m. Sunday. The "build" of a good sandwich is an art. You start with the proper foundation of bread then adroitly layer ingredients, creating an item that is pleasing to both the eye and the palate. The Remington from the carryout section of the Artful Gourmet in Owings Mills is a prime example of sandwich art. This bistro, tucked in a corner of the Brookside Commons shops, has an extensive carryout menu and a counter at the rear of the restaurant to accommodate customers who grab their food and go. The sandwiches and entrees are named in honor of artists.
NEWS
By Tracy Swartz and Tracy Swartz,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
Every week, Scott Wilson drives to the Outback Steakhouse in Ellicott City, pulls his green truck to the curb and waits to pick up dinner for his family of five. Inside, two takeout waitresses rush to take phone orders while another runs Wilson's food out to his Chevrolet. This steakhouse, one of the chain's busiest outlets in the nation, logs 50 to 60 curbside takeout orders each weekday and 150 orders each weekend day, so workers try to keep traffic moving. "Its very convenient," said Wilson, 47, a Marriottsville contractor.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
Members of the state's fractious racing industry are negotiating a compromise that could inject $4 million - funds that had been set aside for track renovations -into thoroughbred race purses this year. The money, which has been collected through a temporary increase in the "takeout," or the amount of wagers withheld from winning bettors, was supposed to be used to support $35 million in bonds for upgrading Pimlico Racecourse and Laurel Park. However, the plan, unveiled to great fanfare in 1999 and passed by the General Assembly the next year, fizzled.
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