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Taiwan Strait

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NEWS
By Steven Phillips | February 2, 2012
In light of the North Korean nuclear threat, Sino-Japanese territorial disputes and conflicting claims in the South China Sea, Taiwan appears to be the exception in a region of rising tensions. Beijing claims that Taiwan is part of China but has been willing to take a long-term approach in the hope that enhancing cross-Strait ties will bring the island into China peacefully. Taiwanese have shown little interest in provoking the mainland by declaring permanent independence. At the same time, they will not risk their freedom or sovereignty though closer political ties to the mainland.
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NEWS
By Steven Phillips | February 2, 2012
In light of the North Korean nuclear threat, Sino-Japanese territorial disputes and conflicting claims in the South China Sea, Taiwan appears to be the exception in a region of rising tensions. Beijing claims that Taiwan is part of China but has been willing to take a long-term approach in the hope that enhancing cross-Strait ties will bring the island into China peacefully. Taiwanese have shown little interest in provoking the mainland by declaring permanent independence. At the same time, they will not risk their freedom or sovereignty though closer political ties to the mainland.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
When China fired unarmed missiles into waters near Taiwan's two main ports last week, Richard C. Clements, vice president of a Baltimore recycling operation, worried that his company might feel the sting. He was right. The ripples from events half a world away washed up on Mr. Clements doorstep this week when a steamship line hired to transport 1,000 tons of newspapers and other waste paper to customers in Asia informed him that the trip to Taiwan had been canceled. His company's profit loss: $3,000.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 2000
BEIJING -- In his inauguration speech this morning, Taiwan's new president, Chen Shui-bian, refused to knuckle under to war threats from Beijing and state that the democratic island is a part of "One China." However, the 50-year-old son of a tenant farmer continued to make overtures to the mainland in hopes of improving relations across the Taiwan Strait -- one of the most dangerous stretches of water in the world. In his much-anticipated, 4,500-word address, Chen spoke of a common history and culture between Chinese people on both sides of the strait and restated a pledge not to declare independence as long as Beijing does not attack.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 20, 1996
Dole has from now till San Diego to take charge of the party and get the campaign right, just as Bush did four years ago.Let's not get up the Taiwan Strait without a paddle.An Anne Arundel jury determined that the First Amendment granted equal-opportunity defamation to all candidates.The U.S. is giving Israel high tech gadgetry to prevent border infiltration. If it works, Texas will get the same.Pub Date: 3/20/96
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 2000
BEIJING -- In his inauguration speech this morning, Taiwan's new president, Chen Shui-bian, refused to knuckle under to war threats from Beijing and state that the democratic island is a part of "One China." However, the 50-year-old son of a tenant farmer continued to make overtures to the mainland in hopes of improving relations across the Taiwan Strait -- one of the most dangerous stretches of water in the world. In his much-anticipated, 4,500-word address, Chen spoke of a common history and culture between Chinese people on both sides of the strait and restated a pledge not to declare independence as long as Beijing does not attack.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 1996
QUEMOY, Taiwan - The years of dictatorship, war and isolation have taken a sad toll on this small island in the Taiwan Strait.It has the look of a garrison town: well-paved roads and neat flower beds, to be sure, but also a stunted economy and the weary feel of a place that young people abandoned long ago.Making matters worse for Quemoy's 50,000 residents is that they briefly tasted prosperity.By 1992, the Cold War that once made this strategic island a household name in the conflict between China and the United States over Taiwan had ended.
NEWS
March 26, 1996
THE VOTERS OF TAIWAN gave a lesson in democracy to the autocrats of Beijing. President Lee Teng-hui won 54 percent of the vote against three opponents in the first presidential election ever held in any part of China. Without the threats and military bullying against him, his vote total would have been far lower.The election was followed by calming noises from both sides. Beijing ended its military exercises and did not announce any more. Mr. Lee's regime announced it would think about direct trade links to the mainland.
NEWS
March 19, 1996
TAIWAN'S ELECTION Saturday will be the first free vote for a chief executive in China's long history. That probably makes mainland rulers as angry as President Lee Teng-hui's salami-slice tactics of gaining more recognition for a successful island that is only theoretically part of the "one China" still espoused by Beijing and Taipei.For all its three million men at arms, China lacks sealift and airlift capacity to invade Taiwan, whose forces of hardly one-sixth as many are better equipped.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 25, 1999
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- On one level, they spoke the same language. On a deeper level, they couldn't communicate at all.That is how Chiang Pei-ling recalls her experience with several mainland Chinese students during an exchange program a few years ago. At first, they chatted comfortably. When the topic turned to politics, though, they argued over the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown -- which one mainland student insisted had never occurred."We were surprised," says Chiang, now a 25-year-old law student here at National Chengchi University.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 25, 1999
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- On one level, they spoke the same language. On a deeper level, they couldn't communicate at all.That is how Chiang Pei-ling recalls her experience with several mainland Chinese students during an exchange program a few years ago. At first, they chatted comfortably. When the topic turned to politics, though, they argued over the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown -- which one mainland student insisted had never occurred."We were surprised," says Chiang, now a 25-year-old law student here at National Chengchi University.
NEWS
March 26, 1996
THE VOTERS OF TAIWAN gave a lesson in democracy to the autocrats of Beijing. President Lee Teng-hui won 54 percent of the vote against three opponents in the first presidential election ever held in any part of China. Without the threats and military bullying against him, his vote total would have been far lower.The election was followed by calming noises from both sides. Beijing ended its military exercises and did not announce any more. Mr. Lee's regime announced it would think about direct trade links to the mainland.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 20, 1996
Dole has from now till San Diego to take charge of the party and get the campaign right, just as Bush did four years ago.Let's not get up the Taiwan Strait without a paddle.An Anne Arundel jury determined that the First Amendment granted equal-opportunity defamation to all candidates.The U.S. is giving Israel high tech gadgetry to prevent border infiltration. If it works, Texas will get the same.Pub Date: 3/20/96
NEWS
March 19, 1996
TAIWAN'S ELECTION Saturday will be the first free vote for a chief executive in China's long history. That probably makes mainland rulers as angry as President Lee Teng-hui's salami-slice tactics of gaining more recognition for a successful island that is only theoretically part of the "one China" still espoused by Beijing and Taipei.For all its three million men at arms, China lacks sealift and airlift capacity to invade Taiwan, whose forces of hardly one-sixth as many are better equipped.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 1996
BEIJING - Establishing the threshold for a new round of military escalation in the tense week leading up to Taiwan's first direct presidential election, Chinese Premier Li Peng warned the United States yesterday to keep its warships out of the Taiwan Strait."
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1996
When China fired unarmed missiles into waters near Taiwan's two main ports last week, Richard C. Clements, vice president of a Baltimore recycling operation, worried that his company might feel the sting. He was right. The ripples from events half a world away washed up on Mr. Clements doorstep this week when a steamship line hired to transport 1,000 tons of newspapers and other waste paper to customers in Asia informed him that the trip to Taiwan had been canceled. His company's profit loss: $3,000.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 1996
BEIJING - Establishing the threshold for a new round of military escalation in the tense week leading up to Taiwan's first direct presidential election, Chinese Premier Li Peng warned the United States yesterday to keep its warships out of the Taiwan Strait."
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 15, 1996
QUEMOY, Taiwan - The years of dictatorship, war and isolation have taken a sad toll on this small island in the Taiwan Strait.It has the look of a garrison town: well-paved roads and neat flower beds, to be sure, but also a stunted economy and the weary feel of a place that young people abandoned long ago.Making matters worse for Quemoy's 50,000 residents is that they briefly tasted prosperity.By 1992, the Cold War that once made this strategic island a household name in the conflict between China and the United States over Taiwan had ended.
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