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NEWS
March 31, 2014
A concerned citizenry is essential for a healthy democracy. While a great deal of attention is focused on the recent protests in Taiwan, it is our responsibility to elaborate the effort of the Republic of China (Taiwan) government to address concerns about the Cross-Strait Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) ("Taiwan head chastises protests on trade deal," March 24). The TiSA was signed in accordance with the ROC principle of "putting Taiwan first for the benefits of the people. " The Legislative Yuan has held a total of 16 public hearings on the TiSA since it was signed in June 2013, and the relevant government authorities have organized over 100 forums to explain the pact to the public.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
A concerned citizenry is essential for a healthy democracy. While a great deal of attention is focused on the recent protests in Taiwan, it is our responsibility to elaborate the effort of the Republic of China (Taiwan) government to address concerns about the Cross-Strait Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) ("Taiwan head chastises protests on trade deal," March 24). The TiSA was signed in accordance with the ROC principle of "putting Taiwan first for the benefits of the people. " The Legislative Yuan has held a total of 16 public hearings on the TiSA since it was signed in June 2013, and the relevant government authorities have organized over 100 forums to explain the pact to the public.
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SPORTS
January 24, 2010
The Los Angeles Dodgers will travel to Taiwan in March for a pair of exhibition games against a team from the Chinese Professional Baseball League. The Dodgers' two-game set March 13-14 will not be part of the official spring training schedule, which Los Angeles begins March 5 against the Chicago White Sox. The Dodgers were the first big league club to play in Taiwan in 1993, when they competed against a team of Chinese all-stars. They also played the San Diego Padres in two spring training games in Beijing in March 2008, the first major league games played in China.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Afaa Michael Weaver, a Baltimore native who spent 15 years as a factory worker, has won one the country's most lucrative poetry prizes. Weaver, a professor at Simmons College in Boston, received the $100,000 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award for his most recent poetry collection, "The Government of Nature. " "My license to be a poet is one I inherited from black and poor people who built cultures out of a faith in stuggle and hope," Weaver writes on his website .  Weaver, 62, was born in East Baltimore to parents with little formal education.
NEWS
March 9, 2005
CHINESE authorities yesterday released the first details of a worrisome new law that is expected to be adopted next week and that pre-authorizes military action against Taiwan in response to potential moves by the island toward independence. The move should be of great concern not only in Washington - which has protested in advance and could easily get drawn into any armed conflict in the Taiwan Strait - but also particularly within the European Union, where pressures have been mounting to lift a longstanding embargo on arms sales to China.
NEWS
September 3, 1995
The opening shots in Taiwan's March 1996 presidential election were missiles fired from mainland China into the sea between Taiwan and Japan. It was an exercise for missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads, against which Taiwan and Japan have no defense. They are China's President Jiang Zemin's emphatic votes against the re-election of Lee Teng-hui as president of the Republic of China on Taiwan.Mr. Lee's candidacy was adopted by his Nationalist Party and his popularity soars with every sign of Mr. Jiang's hostility.
NEWS
April 30, 1993
China and the United States broke the diplomatic ice over a ping pong table. China and Taiwan accomplished the same thing this week over a conference table in Singapore.The result in the foreseeable future will be the same: closer working relationships between the communist rulers on the mainland and the remnants of its Kuomintang predecessor. Perhaps in time the "two Chinas" will be more or less reunited. Each denies that there are "two Chinas," and each agrees that Taiwan is Chinese. The dispute is over who rules them, and as the generations that fought each other in the '30s and '40s die off, that will become a pragmatic issue rather than the ideological and emotional one it is now.Actually China and Taiwan (which calls itself the Republic of China, as contrasted with the People's Republic of China on the mainland)
NEWS
March 26, 2004
THE MUDDLED outcome of Taiwan's chaotic exercise in electoral democracy last weekend serves U.S. interests by handing neither the island's independence movement nor China a triumph. The situation remains tense - with street protests and wrangling over how to recount the tight presidential vote - and it could still spin out of control. But if the outcome stands as expected and if China keeps its cool, there's still plenty of room for maintaining the political ambiguity within which Taiwan has thrived.
NEWS
December 15, 2004
IN TAIWAN'S legislative elections last weekend, the island's voters handed their president a setback, Beijing's saber-rattlers a victory, and a caught-in-the-middle United States at least a temporary reprieve from escalating cross-strait tensions. Having earlier this year voted their pro-independence President Chen Shui-bian a second term, Taiwanese voters had been expected to accord his Democratic Progressive Party a parliamentary majority. And Mr. Chen then was expected to proceed toward attempting to rewrite the Republic of China's constitution and perhaps even the island's political name to reflect in law its growing de facto independence from China -- potential moves prompting increasingly credible military threats from Beijing.
NEWS
By Stephen D. Bryen | April 2, 2001
WASHINGTON -- For 10 or more years the United States has tilted heavily toward China and left Taiwan in the cold. The Bush administration recognizes this must change. The United States naturally had reason to want a positive relationship with China. After all, China has a potentially huge market for the United States and an appetite for our high technology. Hundreds, if not thousands, of U.S. firms have opened business ties to China, and barriers to trade such as export controls have been reduced to a minimum.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | December 11, 2013
As Grace Lee Chou rang a brass school bell by hand in the hallways of Loch Raven High School on a recent Sunday afternoon, television sets in many area homes were tuned into the Ravens game and families were busy with typical weekend activities. But six first- and second-graders were soon hard at work in a classroom, repeating letters and consonant blends in unison as their teacher, Julie Liu, pointed to them one by one on a chalkboard. The children were competing to see who could recite the letters the loudest and who could get the most correct, a scene common in schools the world over.
NEWS
By Steven Phillips | January 14, 2013
Over the past two years, the Obama administration has focused greater diplomatic attention and military resources on East Asia as part of a policy described as a "pivot" or "rebalancing. " While American leaders are loath to admit it publicly, this is a response to China's growing influence, particularly Beijing's territorial claims around its borders. China now has the world's second-largest economy and a rapidly modernizing military. It is led by a Communist Party that maintains its power by promoting a strong sense of national pride and expectations of China's continued rise to greatness.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen is leaning toward not pitching for his native Taiwan in this spring's World Baseball Classic in March, according to an industry source. Taiwan, which competes internationally as Chinese Taipei, is playing in a World Baseball Classic qualifier next week in Taiwan against the Philippines, New Zealand and Thailand. Chen, who pitched for Chinese Taipei in the 2008 Beijing Olympics - he was 1-0 in two starts - and was a member of the team in the 2004 Athens Olympics, was 12-11 during his rookie campaign with the Orioles and was the winning pitcher in Game 2 of the American League Division Series.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Orioles manager Buck Showalter said he is looking forward to seeing how Wei-Yin Chen performs in his first big league start. "It's different," Showalter said. “Thank goodness. I'm looking forward to it.” The 26-year-old lefty from Taiwan will be facing the heralded New York Yankees. The game will be broadcast live in Taiwan - at 7 a.m. Wednesday morning. “There will be a lot of people late to work today, or tomorrow, whatever it is,” Showalter said. “I think it's tomorrow.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
When Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen takes the mound at Camden Yards on Tuesday night for his first major league start against the New York Yankees, an entire nation will be watching. Half a world away, in Chen's home country of Taiwan, baseball fans will get up early in the morning for the 7:05 a.m. first pitch to watch their latest native son who has made it to the big leagues. Taiwanese television network Formosa TV is scheduled to air the Orioles' game live, and two other national networks are expected to do the same.
NEWS
By Steven Phillips | February 2, 2012
In light of the North Korean nuclear threat, Sino-Japanese territorial disputes and conflicting claims in the South China Sea, Taiwan appears to be the exception in a region of rising tensions. Beijing claims that Taiwan is part of China but has been willing to take a long-term approach in the hope that enhancing cross-Strait ties will bring the island into China peacefully. Taiwanese have shown little interest in provoking the mainland by declaring permanent independence. At the same time, they will not risk their freedom or sovereignty though closer political ties to the mainland.
NEWS
By James F. Hoge Jr | October 29, 1997
WITH CHINA and the United States refurbishing their relationship, the issue of Taiwan's status increasingly stands out as a potential deal-breaker.Differences on other fronts appear containable for the foreseeable future, within an overall policy of engagement.But Taiwan, struggling to maintain its autonomy against insistent pressure for incorporation from China's Communist government, could become a casus belli involving the United States.This was my conclusion at the close of a recent two-week trip to China and Taiwan, during which I discussed a broad array of issues with government officials, scholars, journalists and businessmen.
NEWS
By CHENG WEN-TSANG | May 26, 2006
Each year for nearly a decade, rejection of Taiwan's application to participate in the World Health Assembly has been treated as an annual ritual. This year, the international community should review the issue more thoroughly. The World Health Organization was established with lofty ideals. Like the International Committee of the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders, it should transcend national borders and political conflicts to offer assistance to all those who are suffering from illness and promote health for all of humankind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | September 25, 2011
What's new this season? Some older folks, some minor celebrities (if you rank them midway on a scale from “cave-dwelling hermit” to “the cast of 'Jersey Shore'), and a dating couple who are here to test-drive their relationship. Oh, wait, that's every season. The race begins in California, and after a quick scavenger hunt to find the first clue, the teams head to the airport to fly to Taiwan. Which brings us to: THE MOST AMAZING THING TO EVER HAPPEN ON "THE AMAZING RACE": Kaylani and Lisa are former Vegas Showgirls who promise us that they are not dumb.
SPORTS
By EDITED FROM TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICES | January 24, 2010
The Los Angeles Dodgers will travel to Taiwan in March for a pair of exhibition games against a team from the Chinese Professional Baseball League. The Dodgers' two-game set March 13-14 will not be part of the official spring training schedule, which Los Angeles begins March 5 against the Chicago White Sox. The Dodgers were the first big league club to play in Taiwan in 1993, when they competed against a team of Chinese all-stars. They also played the San Diego Padres in two spring training games in Beijing in March 2008, the first major league games played in China.
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