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Tailhook Association

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NEWS
September 14, 1994
The In the Nation column yesterday erroneously reported tha former naval officer Paula Coughlin had reached a settlement with the Navy over alleged sexual abuse at a Tailhook convention. She reached a settlement with the Tailhook Association, as the article reported. The Associated Press erroneously added the Navy as part of her lawsuit.The Sun regrets the errors.FTC
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NEWS
September 14, 1994
The In the Nation column yesterday erroneously reported tha former naval officer Paula Coughlin had reached a settlement with the Navy over alleged sexual abuse at a Tailhook convention. She reached a settlement with the Tailhook Association, as the article reported. The Associated Press erroneously added the Navy as part of her lawsuit.The Sun regrets the errors.FTC
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Four days before the trial of a lawsuit over the bawdy 1991 convention of a naval aviators' group, the Tailhook Association, in Las Vegas, Nev., the group reached a settlement with the plaintiff, a former Navy lieutenant who was among the women sexually abused there.The settlement was disclosed yesterday afternoon by lawyers for the Tailhook Association and Paula A. Coughlin, who filed the lawsuit last year.The lawyers declined to discuss the terms, saying in their joint statement only that the case "has been resolved to the mutual satisfaction of both parties."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Four days before the trial of a lawsuit over the bawdy 1991 convention of a naval aviators' group, the Tailhook Association, in Las Vegas, Nev., the group reached a settlement with the plaintiff, a former Navy lieutenant who was among the women sexually abused there.The settlement was disclosed yesterday afternoon by lawyers for the Tailhook Association and Paula A. Coughlin, who filed the lawsuit last year.The lawyers declined to discuss the terms, saying in their joint statement only that the case "has been resolved to the mutual satisfaction of both parties."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 8, 1993
SAN DIEGO -- Shunned by the Navy and abandoned by most of its active-duty members and corporate sponsors, the Tailhook Association will gather here this weekend for its first convention since a four-day bacchanal in 1991 transformed a little-known band of aviators into a notorious organization whose name is synonymous with sexual misconduct.Gone from this year's convention, organizers say, will be the hospitality suites, where scores of women were assaulted, where fliers exposed their testicles, drank from a dispenser shaped like a rhinoceros penis and wore "Women Are Property" T-shirts.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 29, 1993
Boston. -- The report begins with a table of contents unmatched in the annals of military manuals. There is a section on Indecent Assaults. Another on Indecent Exposure. A third labeled Other Improper Conduct.To get a taste of Tailhook all you have to do is read the subheads: Gantlet. Streaking. Leg Shaving. Butt biting. Zapping. The taste you get is raunchy and sour.But to get the full flavor of the Tailhook convention of 1991, you have to read every word, follow the investigators through the rubble of what was called later a ''free fire zone.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | February 20, 1994
Washington.--Scene: The third floor of the Las Vegas Hilton, Sept. 7, 1991. The corridor is flanked by pawing, grasping Navy and Marine aviators engaged in one pursuit -- grabbing female officers wherever they can get hold of them as they run "the gantlet;" in hospitality suites, X-rated movies flicker; in another room, women are having their legs shaved by men; a stripper is performing somewhere. Elsewhere prostitutes are plying their trade.Debauchery.Scene: The fourth floor of the Pentagon, Feb. 15, 1994.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | October 30, 1993
NORFOLK, Va. -- The Tailhook-related assault charge pending against a Navy flier will be dropped on the recommendation of a reviewing officer, an attorney for the flier said yesterday. And the 1991 president of the Tailhook Association was cleared yesterday of any misconduct at that year's fateful convention.The reviewer's recommendation in the case of Cmdr. Gregory E. Tritt, 43, means that only one naval or Marine Corps officer -- out of 137 cases originally recommended for possible punishment by Pentagon investigators -- faces court-martial on an assault charge stemming from the 1991 Navy fliers' convention in Las Vegas at which investigators say dozens of women were fondled or groped.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | July 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Beverly B. Byron of Maryland, a seven-term lawmaker who was defeated in the March primary, is one of several women being considered as a replacement to outgoing Navy Secretary H. Lawrence Garrett III.Mrs. Byron, 59, a conservative Democrat and Armed Services Committee member, is being pushed for the top Navy job by Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, a Baltimore County Republican, according to a senior White House official.The official, who termed Mrs. Byron's chances "possible," said that besides the Frederick Democrat's pro-defense views, her gender is also a plus.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Sean O'Keefe, the Pentagon comptroller and a confidant of Defense Secretary Dick Cheney, is expected to be named secretary of the Navy today, senior Bush administration officials said yesterday.Mr. O'Keefe, a 36-year-old former staff director for a Senate defense subcommittee, will assume control of a Navy Department struggling to rebound from a scandal involving the assault of 26 women at a convention of naval aviators last year.The scandal and subsequent questions about two Navy investigations into the affair forced the previous Navy secretary, H. Lawrence Garrett III, to turn over the inquiry to the Pentagon's inspector general and then, on June 26, to resign.
NEWS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE | February 20, 1994
Washington.--Scene: The third floor of the Las Vegas Hilton, Sept. 7, 1991. The corridor is flanked by pawing, grasping Navy and Marine aviators engaged in one pursuit -- grabbing female officers wherever they can get hold of them as they run "the gantlet;" in hospitality suites, X-rated movies flicker; in another room, women are having their legs shaved by men; a stripper is performing somewhere. Elsewhere prostitutes are plying their trade.Debauchery.Scene: The fourth floor of the Pentagon, Feb. 15, 1994.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 8, 1993
SAN DIEGO -- Shunned by the Navy and abandoned by most of its active-duty members and corporate sponsors, the Tailhook Association will gather here this weekend for its first convention since a four-day bacchanal in 1991 transformed a little-known band of aviators into a notorious organization whose name is synonymous with sexual misconduct.Gone from this year's convention, organizers say, will be the hospitality suites, where scores of women were assaulted, where fliers exposed their testicles, drank from a dispenser shaped like a rhinoceros penis and wore "Women Are Property" T-shirts.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 29, 1993
Boston. -- The report begins with a table of contents unmatched in the annals of military manuals. There is a section on Indecent Assaults. Another on Indecent Exposure. A third labeled Other Improper Conduct.To get a taste of Tailhook all you have to do is read the subheads: Gantlet. Streaking. Leg Shaving. Butt biting. Zapping. The taste you get is raunchy and sour.But to get the full flavor of the Tailhook convention of 1991, you have to read every word, follow the investigators through the rubble of what was called later a ''free fire zone.
NEWS
By Newport News Daily Press | October 27, 1993
NORFOLK, Va. -- After two years, thousands of witness interviews and extraordinary controversy, the Navy opens the first court-martial today in the Tailhook scandal.A motion to dismiss the case was denied yesterday. The denial was announced nearly simultaneously with the news that two officers whose cases had been reopened this summer by the Navy -- Cmdrs. Robert C. Yakeley and Gregory E. Peairs -- have been cleared of any wrongdoing at the 1991 Navy fliers' convention in Las Vegas. Dozens of women reported being fondled and groped by officers during after-hours parties at the convention.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Del Quentin Wilber and Tom Bowman and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 26, 2000
WASHINGTON - The Navy is investigating allegations of misconduct at last week's convention of the Tailhook Association, the private naval aviators' organization whose 1991 annual meeting dissolved into a drunken spree of debauchery and sexual assault, implicating more than 100 officers and becoming a synonym for grossly unacceptable behavior. This year's Tailhook convention marked the first time since 1991 that the Navy had allowed its top officers to participate. Navy officials said yesterday that a man and his wife, both civilians whom they refused to identify, alleged that several dozen people, not in uniform but believed to be part of the three-day convention at John Ascuaga's Nugget casino and resort in Sparks, Nev., verbally assaulted them as they tried to return to their hotel room shortly after midnight last Saturday.
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