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Tailgating

SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
He came, he saw, he squawked.Hamid Qayyum celebrated Baltimore's return to the NFL yesterday from the back of a pickup truck, with his body covered in black makeup and feathers extending down both arms for makeshift wings. Among the accessories were black shorts, sandals and sunglasses, which went nicely with the word "Go" painted in white letters on his chest.The Ravens were making their preseason debut, and Qayyum, 27, of Baltimore had dressed for the occasion.Most of his friends, Loyola College graduates like himself, took a more subtle approach to offering support for the Ravens, removing their shirts and painting a single letter on their chests that spelled out the team's name when they stood together.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
Shannon Gierczak thought that when Matthew Marriott proposed, it would be thrilling, but in an easygoing sort of way. Matthew is not given to grand gestures. Shannon had loved him long enough to accept that. So when Matthew began acting odd during a Ravens football game in 1998, Shannon was concerned. The Ravens were set to play the Minnesota Vikings on a rainy Sunday afternoon. Shannon and Matthew were tailgating with a large group of family and friends outside the stadium. Matthew asked Shannon to accompany him to the restroom.
FEATURES
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
CLEVELAND -- Believe me, it's not easy being a sports fan when you're from Cleveland and living in Baltimore. Albert Belle? Can deal with him, sort of. I root for the O's. But Art Modell? Can't deal with him at all. Couldn't possibly root for the Ravens. Ever.So I arrived here last Wednesday to get my football fix in Cleveland, my boyhood home, a place splashed with orange and brown and foamy beer, where people are preparing for the biggest party in a long, long time.The Cleveland Browns, thank the Lord, are back.
NEWS
December 3, 1996
Government misled us about air bagsRecent news reports have revealed that at least 50 people, including 30 children, have died as a result of automobile air bag releases during slow speed accidents.I wear seat belts and shoulder harnesses at all times, but I have had a fear since the introduction of air bags that they will place me in jeopardy during a slow speed accident.The very device that could save my life in a high speed collision would cause me to lose control of my vehicle in a slow speed accident because of the rapidly expanding bag.I bring this up as another problem that may have been swept under the rug by our federal protectors.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2002
THE MORE we drive, the more, it seems, other drivers drive us crazy. Here's what you're saying: Ben Leibowitz of Woodstock responded to my March 26 column, which discussed proper signaling at roundabouts: "Your column presumes that the knuckledraggers who infest the highways and byways of our fair state signal at all, much less for right or left turns, or lane changes. They are far too pre- occupied with yakking on their cell phones, or seeing if they can get close enough to smell your exhaust firsthand.
NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Local sports fans can trade in their beer and baseball caps for champagne and fedoras Sunday as St. John's College plays host to the U.S. Naval Academy in their 27th annual croquet match. In a display of sophisticated spectatorship - think The Great Gatsby meets tailgating - a crowd of 1,500 is expected to gather on the St. John's campus to watch the college's croquet team play the Midshipmen from the 28th company. The winning team is awarded the coveted Annapolis Cup. Jo Ann Mattson, director of alumni relations at St. John's, said audience members come to socialize and show off extravagant gowns and suits as much as for the game itself.
NEWS
By Lindsay Kalter and Lindsay Kalter,lindsay.kalter@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Local sports fans can trade in their beer and baseball caps for champagne and fedoras Sunday as St. John's College plays host to the U.S. Naval Academy in their 27th annual croquet match. In a display of sophisticated spectatorship - think The Great Gatsby meets tailgating - a crowd of 1,500 is expected to gather on St. John's campus to watch the college's croquet team play the Midshipmen from the 28th company. The winning team is awarded the Annapolis Cup. Jo Ann Mattson, director of alumni relations at St. John's, said audience members come to socialize and show off extravagant gowns and suits as much as for the game itself.
ENTERTAINMENT
Tribune Newspapers | December 20, 2012
Whether your tailgate includes a custom grill setup and team color-coordinated tents, or a simple picnic on a well-worn blanket, no pregame ritual is complete without the spread. This is one party that's as much about the food as it is about fans and football. With a little advance preparation, you can add a pressed muffuletta sandwich, a perfect portable meal, to your tailgate spread. It doesn't require anything too complicated, just a little planning. Just pile a hollowed-out loaf of bread with purchased or homemade olive relish, lettuce, cheese and a medley of sliced meats, then wrap and weight the sandwich at least a few hours to compress.
NEWS
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Is football — more specifically, Thursday's Ravens-49ers game, the first time a Baltimore NFL team has played on Thanksgiving in 46 years — threatening to overshadow your holiday meal plans? Instead of fighting the game, why not embrace it? To help, we've recast the traditional Thanksgiving foods with a tailgate twist. You can still have your turkey, your stuffing, your potatoes, your greens, your pie, but in a game-friendly way. Think of it as a tailgate party at your table.
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