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NEWS
February 17, 2011
Their voices have been heard. The people have spoken. The streets of Cairo echo with the clatter of democracy and freedom. However, I wonder if freedom in Egypt is truly possible. Can a regime torn by controversy and dictatorship follow with freedom and liberty? Many Americans tend to view Muslim countries with a cautious eye. However, this past weekend I stumbled upon a very peculiar image. The image depicted was thousands of men and women praying together side-by-side after the conclusion of dictatorship in Tahrir Square in Cairo (a feat typically unusual outside of the holy city of Mecca)
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NEWS
July 8, 2013
Nobody ever said Egypt's transition to democracy would be easy. But yesterday's violence in which dozens of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi were killed and hundreds wounded by security forces outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo has made that country's path from dictatorship to democracy infinitely more difficult. Last week's military coup against Egypt's first democratically elected president was proof enough that Egyptians are still a long way from realizing the ideals of representative government and rule of law inspired by the Arab Spring.
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TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | March 23, 2008
We're considering the idea of swapping houses while in London. How can we find a suitable family? There are many home-exchange sites on the Internet offering domestic and international house swaps ranging from a few days to a month or more. Britain is a popular destination. Among the better-known sites are Homeexchange.com and Homelink. org. Homeexchange charges $99.95 for a one-year membership; at Homelink, you'll pay $110. The site Digsville.com charges $44.95 but has fewer listings.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The long simmering tensions between Egypt's Islamist-backed President Mohamed Morsi and liberal and secular opposition groups erupted over the weekend into violent street demonstrations that have plunged the country into crisis. Unless Mr. Morsi can address the protesters' demands for a more inclusive government that represents all the country's political factions, Egypt's fragile new democracy could collapse into chaos and usher in a return to military rule. Two years ago, Egyptians gathered by the hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square and other cities to force an end to former President Hosni Mubarak's 40-year autocratic rule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Special to the Sun | February 21, 1999
"Cairo: The City Victorious," by Max Rodenbeck. Knopf. 288 pages. $27.50.You have taken a wrong turn and are in hell. It is every degree as hot as you feared. And is painfully bright, everything bleached dead white -- another fear fulfulled -- and tortuously loud because demons in Fiats constantly honk their horns while a hundred buses roar, while you try to breath air that seems mostly grit. Tahrir Square, in central Cairo, is the busiest, most energizing hell I know.In the Arab world, haughty Damascus sinks to the level of provincial capital when compared to Cairo.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
For the first time in some 5,000 years of Egyptian civilization, voters went to the polls this week to select a leader in a contest where the outcome was uncertain. Given Egypt's crucial role in maintaining order and stability in the Middle East and the wide range of candidates, from secular to military to Islamist, that fact is unnerving to some in the United States, Israel and elsewhere. But it has been a cause of unbridled jubilation throughout Egypt, where millions of ordinary people lined up to cast ballots and determine their national destiny.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
Nobody ever said Egypt's transition to democracy would be easy. But yesterday's violence in which dozens of supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi were killed and hundreds wounded by security forces outside the Republican Guard headquarters in Cairo has made that country's path from dictatorship to democracy infinitely more difficult. Last week's military coup against Egypt's first democratically elected president was proof enough that Egyptians are still a long way from realizing the ideals of representative government and rule of law inspired by the Arab Spring.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
The long simmering tensions between Egypt's Islamist-backed President Mohamed Morsi and liberal and secular opposition groups erupted over the weekend into violent street demonstrations that have plunged the country into crisis. Unless Mr. Morsi can address the protesters' demands for a more inclusive government that represents all the country's political factions, Egypt's fragile new democracy could collapse into chaos and usher in a return to military rule. Two years ago, Egyptians gathered by the hundreds of thousands in Cairo's Tahrir Square and other cities to force an end to former President Hosni Mubarak's 40-year autocratic rule.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
Initial results from Egypt's first elections since the fall of President Hosni Mubarak are in, and it appears Islamist parties have captured the lion's share of the vote. The rise of politicians eager to curtail basic human rights, particularly for women, in the name of religion is cause for real concern, but this early round of voting does not necessarily mean the country is headed for an Iran-like theocracy. The U.S. and its allies must resist the impulse to do anything that might push the country in that direction.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
The images shown on the news media are startling: violence rages on the streets of Cairo while a divided government continues to sow seeds of discord. I have spent some time in Tahrir Square this past week and have seen a very different perspective. I saw no violence, I saw no despair. Instead, I saw a people reclaiming their unique voice for democracy. The situation in Egypt is tense, but the future is bright. What started as a political power grab by President Mohamed Morsi in the shadow of his success ending the Gaza conflict turned into chaos on the streets as rival protesters from opposition groups and government supporters voiced their differing visions for the future of Egypt.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
The images shown on the news media are startling: violence rages on the streets of Cairo while a divided government continues to sow seeds of discord. I have spent some time in Tahrir Square this past week and have seen a very different perspective. I saw no violence, I saw no despair. Instead, I saw a people reclaiming their unique voice for democracy. The situation in Egypt is tense, but the future is bright. What started as a political power grab by President Mohamed Morsi in the shadow of his success ending the Gaza conflict turned into chaos on the streets as rival protesters from opposition groups and government supporters voiced their differing visions for the future of Egypt.
NEWS
May 24, 2012
For the first time in some 5,000 years of Egyptian civilization, voters went to the polls this week to select a leader in a contest where the outcome was uncertain. Given Egypt's crucial role in maintaining order and stability in the Middle East and the wide range of candidates, from secular to military to Islamist, that fact is unnerving to some in the United States, Israel and elsewhere. But it has been a cause of unbridled jubilation throughout Egypt, where millions of ordinary people lined up to cast ballots and determine their national destiny.
NEWS
December 5, 2011
Initial results from Egypt's first elections since the fall of President Hosni Mubarak are in, and it appears Islamist parties have captured the lion's share of the vote. The rise of politicians eager to curtail basic human rights, particularly for women, in the name of religion is cause for real concern, but this early round of voting does not necessarily mean the country is headed for an Iran-like theocracy. The U.S. and its allies must resist the impulse to do anything that might push the country in that direction.
NEWS
February 17, 2011
Their voices have been heard. The people have spoken. The streets of Cairo echo with the clatter of democracy and freedom. However, I wonder if freedom in Egypt is truly possible. Can a regime torn by controversy and dictatorship follow with freedom and liberty? Many Americans tend to view Muslim countries with a cautious eye. However, this past weekend I stumbled upon a very peculiar image. The image depicted was thousands of men and women praying together side-by-side after the conclusion of dictatorship in Tahrir Square in Cairo (a feat typically unusual outside of the holy city of Mecca)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
At the end of a wild week that saw more than 100 attacks on journalists and press facilities in Egypt, TV news executives were left shaking their heads at the volatility and violence, but vowing to continue to find ways to cover the tumult in days ahead. "I think yesterday was as dangerous a day as I've known," Tony Maddox, executive vice president and managing director of CNN International, said late Friday. "I cannot recall a day in which that many TV crews and reporters got threatened, beaten up, had gear stolen and cars attacked," said Maddox, who has overseen coverage in such war zones as Iraq and Afghanistan.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | March 23, 2008
We're considering the idea of swapping houses while in London. How can we find a suitable family? There are many home-exchange sites on the Internet offering domestic and international house swaps ranging from a few days to a month or more. Britain is a popular destination. Among the better-known sites are Homeexchange.com and Homelink. org. Homeexchange charges $99.95 for a one-year membership; at Homelink, you'll pay $110. The site Digsville.com charges $44.95 but has fewer listings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
At the end of a wild week that saw more than 100 attacks on journalists and press facilities in Egypt, TV news executives were left shaking their heads at the volatility and violence, but vowing to continue to find ways to cover the tumult in days ahead. "I think yesterday was as dangerous a day as I've known," Tony Maddox, executive vice president and managing director of CNN International, said late Friday. "I cannot recall a day in which that many TV crews and reporters got threatened, beaten up, had gear stolen and cars attacked," said Maddox, who has overseen coverage in such war zones as Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - Dozens of protesters were kicked, beaten with clubs and thrown into trucks yesterday by hundreds of police and plainclothes agents who rushed the streets to stifle a protest against President Hosni Mubarak. The beatings occurred in Cairo days after Mubarak announced his candidacy in Egypt's first presidential election. The regime has portrayed September's voting as a ground-breaking step toward democracy. It would be the first time that Egyptians have had a chance to chose a president from among multiple candidates.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Special to the Sun | February 21, 1999
"Cairo: The City Victorious," by Max Rodenbeck. Knopf. 288 pages. $27.50.You have taken a wrong turn and are in hell. It is every degree as hot as you feared. And is painfully bright, everything bleached dead white -- another fear fulfulled -- and tortuously loud because demons in Fiats constantly honk their horns while a hundred buses roar, while you try to breath air that seems mostly grit. Tahrir Square, in central Cairo, is the busiest, most energizing hell I know.In the Arab world, haughty Damascus sinks to the level of provincial capital when compared to Cairo.
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